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Photo courtesy of Zoe Moffett, Colorado College.

How The Buzz Of Bees Could Predict Harvest Size For Farmers

See a bee; hear a buzz. That’s what researchers studying the declining bee population are banking on. A new technique based on recording buzzing bees hopes to show farmers just how much pollinating the native bee population is doing in their fields. Vegetable and fruit growers depend on pollinators to do a lot of work in their greenhouses and fields. Pollinators, like bees, flutter about the blossoms on plants and orchard trees, transferring pollen from plant to plant and ensuring that those organisms have a chance at reproducing.

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America's diversity remains on the rise, with all racial and ethnic minorities growing faster than whites from 2015 to 2016, the U.S. Census Bureau says in a new snapshot of the national population. The agency also found the U.S. median age has risen to nearly 38.

Asian and mixed-race people are the two fastest-growing segments of the U.S. population, the U.S. Census Bureau says. Both groups grew by 3 percent from July 2015 to July 2016. In the same 12 months, the non-Hispanic white population grew by just 5,000 people.

Louisiana has become the first state to prohibit all public universities from asking applicants about their criminal history.

By some estimates, as many as 70 to 100 million Americans have some kind of criminal record.

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Today Paul Pepper welcomes back JANE WHITESIDES from the Missouri Symphony Society. This Sunday's "Mostly Mozart" concert at First Baptist Church in Columbia features, among others, resident opera artist SAMUEL WRIGHT and accompanist MUN-TZUNG WONG. They join us in studio to perform a sneak preview at [2:48]. Enjoy! June 22, 2017

Missouri Capitol
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A lawmaker says Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens will sign his bill to ban people convicted of sex offenses against children from coming within 500 feet of children's museums.

Cassville Republican Sen. David Sater said Wednesday that he's meeting with Greitens for a bill signing in Jefferson City Thursday.

Mizzou Columns
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University of Missouri System President Mun Choi wants the university to rescind an honorary degree given to Bill Cosby nearly 20 years ago.

The system's Board of Curators will vote Friday on Choi's recommendation. A university staff memo sent to the curators says sexual assault allegations against Cosby are "incompatible" with the honorary doctorate in humane letters given to him in 1999.

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A federal judge in St. Louis is set to hear an update on the progress Ferguson, Missouri, has made in its agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice.

The St. Louis suburb has been under scrutiny since the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014. Brown, who was black and unarmed, was fatally shot by white Ferguson officer Darren Wilson during a street confrontation, leading to months of unrest.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Politically Speaking podcast team of Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies were on the road again Wednesday, this time to Picasso’s coffee house in the historic downtown of St. Charles. The two welcomed state Sens. Bob Onder and Bill Eigel, Republicans who represent much of St. Charles County.

Onder, of Lake St. Louis, and Eigel, of Weldon Spring, focused on a variety issues and fielded a number of tough questions from the audience. Each praised Gov. Eric Greitens for calling a special legislative session, now underway, to deal with the abortion issue. Both are outspoken opponents of abortion.

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: 


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Aspiring Missouri college police officers will face the same training as other future cops under a bill signed by the governor.

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens on Tuesday signed the legislation. Current law calls for at least 320 hours of training for college police compared to at least 470 hours for most other aspiring officers.

The bill also will give community college police officers the ability to enforce traffic rules, such as speed limits, on campus. Only university police now have that authority.

The legislation takes effect Aug. 28.

Missouri Capitol
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Missouri Democratic Auditor Nicole Galloway says the state could face a $3 billion loss from tax credits over the next 15 years.

A new report released Wednesday by Galloway's office says that's how much lawmakers have authorized for tax credits that have not yet been redeemed.

The auditor's office says the state has faced $5.4 billion in revenue losses from tax credits over the past decade.

Galloway says policymakers should consider the impact tax credits have on the budget.

Sara Shahriari

UM System President Mun Choi announced today that the UM System is focused on saving students money on course materials.

According to Choi, the University will develop a system-wide strategy to encourage use of quality open educational resources – which are free to students. The university will also focus on Auto Access, a program that makes books available online at a lower cost than traditional textbooks.

"Our goal is to move into the future by introducing more open source material so our students can have an outstanding, affordable education," Choi said.

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