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Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

Mountain Of Debt Delays Some Graduates From A Dream: Farming

Liz Graznak runs an organic farm near Jamestown, Missouri, which she calls Happy Hollow Farm . She sells her vegetables to local restaurants, in CSA boxes and at the farmer’s market. But eight years ago, after falling in love with the idea of growing her own local produce, the farm she runs today looked like a near-impossible dream. While on track to earn a PhD in plant breeding, Graznak bought her first box of produce from a nearby farmer. Soon after, she decided then that instead of studying plants, she wanted to grow them. Easier said than done, though.

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Members of Congress return to Washington on Monday after a week-long work sessions in their home districts.

Like some other around the country, St. Louis-area representatives are catching criticism for not using the break to host town hall meetings to hear from constituents.

There was one exception; Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., held a listening session Friday in Hillsboro regarding pension funds.

So where are your representatives, and why aren’t they holding public meetings? Here’s what they said.

Rep. Mike Bost, R-Murphysboro, Ill.

As President Trump prepares a new executive order on vetting refugees and immigrants, one idea keeps cropping up: checking the social media accounts of those coming to the U.S.

In fact, such a program was begun under the Obama administration more than a year ago on a limited basis and is likely to be expanded. But social media vetting is a heavy lift, and it's too early to tell how effective it will be.

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COLUMBIA – The unusually warm February temperatures are threatening vines at mid-Missouri wineries.

Jon Held, President of the Stone Hill Winery in Hermann, said he’s concerned his yield could suffer.

“We could lose a portion of the crop and potentially a great deal of it,” Held said. “There’s really nothing we can do to change that, it’s basically, whatever the good lord gives us, we’ve got to deal with it.”

KOMU 8 Meteorologist Tori Stepanek said the warm temperatures are nothing new.

Ag Leaders Hope To Avoid Budget Cuts In New Farm Bill

13 hours ago
Bryan Thompson for Harvest Public Media

 

At a stressful time for U.S. farmers, the government’s efforts at calming the agricultural waters took center stage Thursday, when the heads of the U.S. Senate’s Agriculture Committee left Washington for the Midwest to solicit opinions on priorities for the next Farm Bill.

U.S. Sens. Pat Roberts, R-KS, and Debbie Stabenow, D-MI, heard from Midwest farmers at their first field hearing on the 2018 Farm Bill at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas.

AP Photo

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe recently turned 93, making him the oldest non-royal head of state in the world.

But in his 37 years in power, he's become a caricature of the corrupt African dictator. Once one of the continent's wealthiest countries, Zimbabwe's economy has halved since 2000. He's sent armed militias to beat and kill political opponents and in 2015 threw a $1 million birthday party for himself, feeding his 20,000 guests dishes like baby elephant even as many of his countrymen live in extreme poverty.

But as Mugabe pushes deeper into his nineties, there are growing questions about his hold on power. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the twilight of the Robert Mugabe era in Zimbabwe and what may come after him.


Today Paul Pepper and DR. DAVID NEWMAN, RoseHeart Hypnotherapy Success Centers, Inc., talk about phobias and how to treat them. Everyone is scared of something, so what gives you "instant flight reaction"? (Arachnophobia is the number one answer.) Dr. Newman tells us that treatment is best left to the professionals, saying: "what we can do in a matter of a few sessions (to get you over it), could take you a few years." February 24, 2017

File Photo / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY (AP) -- Missouri House members have passed a bill to reduce the duration of state jobless benefits to one of the shortest periods nationally.

House members voted 100-56 Thursday to send the measure to the Senate.

The bill is a revival of a failed 2015 plan to cut the maximum benefits to 13 weeks if the state's jobless rate is below 6 percent. That's seven weeks fewer than what's now allowed.

Missouri's unemployment rate in December was 4.4 percent.

Potential Fuel Tax Increase Sparks Controversy

14 hours ago
Andrew Pilewski / KBIA

Missourians could pay more at the gas pump to offset income tax cuts, according to a bill proposed in the Missouri House.

The House read a bill Thursday that would cut income taxes for the top tax bracket in Missouri while raising fuel taxes to offset the cuts. These funds would then be used to finance infrastructure improvements in the state.

Bill sponsor Bart Korman (R) thinks that this bill is a solution to funding road work in Missouri.

ambulance
Creative Commons / Flickr

COLUMBIA -- A new program aiding emergency response is coming to Columbia, according to an announcement from the Columbia Fire Department, MU Healthcare and Boone Hospital.

The File of Life program aims at helping emergency responders when patients are unable to communicate with them. Residents list their medical information on a form, place it in a fireproof file and put it on their fridge. The form includes prescriptions, allergies, medical history and emergency contacts.

Legislators Split On Missouri ID Requirement Bill

Feb 23, 2017
File / KBIA

A bill to make Missouri driver’s licenses compliant with the federal REAL ID Act is moving forward despite strong opposition. The bill has been sent to the House Fiscal Review Committee, where it’s scheduled to be heard February 23.  

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