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Politically Speaking: With one trial out of view, Greitens turns attention to impeachment fight

On the latest episode of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Rachel Lippmann and Jo Mannies detail a dramatic week in Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ legal and political saga. This was supposed to be the first week of Gov. Eric Greitens’ trial for felony invasion of privacy. But as jury selection trudged along at a glacial pace, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office shocked many observers by dropping the case.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sara Shahriari / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers have voted to give state colleges and universities more leeway to raise tuition.

The bill passed the Senate 24-8 and the House 109-31 on Friday. It would allow public universities to raise tuition by as much as 5 percent on top of hikes to keep up with inflation.

The additional 5 percent increase, however, would only be allowed if state funding had been cut the year before. Increases could also not be larger than the amount of the previous year's cut.

Currently, state colleges can only use inflation rates to increase tuition.

Missouri Lawmakers have voted to help new mothers struggling with addiction pay for treatment programs.

The bill, approved by the House Friday in a 133-6 vote, would allow women to receive Medicaid coverage for more than a year after giving birth to pay for substance abuse and mental health programs.

Currently, Medicaid coverage ends about two months after a woman gives birth.

The Republican-led Missouri Legislature has passed a bill to cut the corporate income tax rate from 6.25 percent to 4 percent.

House lawmakers gave the bill final approval in a 96-42 vote Friday, just hours before the 6 p.m. deadline to pass bills.

The 2.25 percent tax cut for businesses would take effect in January 2020 if made law. This revenue loss would be offset in the proposal by changing how multistate corporations can calculate their taxable income.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri prosecutor said Friday that he won't be filing any charges against Gov. Eric Greitens for the way his campaign reported the receipt of a charity donor list used for political fundraising.

The decision by Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson marked a victory for Greitens on the same day that the Republican-controlled Missouri Legislature was to open a monthlong special session to decide whether to try to impeach the Republican governor for various allegations of misconduct.

Commentary: Permanent Interests

May 18, 2018

At Columbia College I teach and study American domestic politics.  I know only enough about foreign policy and international relations to be dangerous.  That said I willingly acknowledge that foreign and domestic policy are inseparably intertwined.  President Trump is betting that foreign policy successes will benefit him politically at home.  More about this in a minute.

MELANIE DIXON says the Ronald McDonald House Charities should be the "charity of choice" because you never know when you might need it. As you might guess, Melanie speaks from personal experience. Hear her story and find out how you can get involved! Plus, KRISTIN BOWEN and CATEY TERRY want you to #WearOrange in support of Gun Violence Awareness Day. A local celebration will be held at Douglass Park on June 1st. Watch for details! (5:00) May 18, 2018

Afternoon Newscast for May 17, 2018

May 17, 2018

  Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: 

The Missouri Legislature has passed a measure that could allow the biggest electric companies in the state to recover more of their costs for infrastructure improvements from customers.

Missouri senators have passed a bill to require public unions to hold recertification elections every three years and get permission annually to withdraw dues from employees' paychecks.

Under the legislation passed 21-11 Wednesday, public labor unions would need more than 50 percent of workers to vote in their favor in order to be recertified.

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