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Kimberly Ruiz, left, stands over a head lower than her partner, Lonnie Kessler, right. She wears dark, black-rimmed glasses, they both wear bright green NORML shirts and smile into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

'One of My Biggest Worries is that I'm Not Going to Get to Say Goodbye Because You Can't Hear Me.'

Lonnie Kessler and Kimberly Ruiz are a couple that lives in Moberly. Lonnie has intractable epilepsy and Kimberly is a disabled vet – and they both advocate for the legalization of medical marijuana in the state. They sat down at the Little Dixie Regional Library in Moberly, and spoke about their relationship and about how both of them having disabilities has influenced and strengthened their relationship. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .

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About 300 people poured into the hallways of the Missouri Capitol Tuesday, calling for lawmakers to avoid creating new laws that would loosen existing gun regulations.

Kim Westerman, who lives in St. Louis and volunteers with the group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, said they’re concerned that pro-gun lawmakers in Missouri remain unmoved by the recent mass shooting at a high school in Florida that claimed 17 lives.

Saint Louis University School of Business to be renamed Chaifetz

2 hours ago

Saint Louis University’s School of Business will be renamed the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business. The university announced Tuesday that Dr. Richard A. Chaifetz, the founder, chairman and CEO at ComPsych Corporation and his wife, Jill Chaifetz, have contributed $15 million to the school. The change is effective immediately.

Richard Chaifetz, a SLU alumnus and trustee, said while his gift contribution does not have set requirements, he hopes it will boost the reputation of the business school that is ranked ninth nationally in undergraduate entrepreneurship.

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Meiying Wu

The Columbia City Council unanimously approved a resolution Monday to begin planning a citywide community-oriented policing program.

The resolution directs City Manager Mike Matthes to design a “citywide program, transition plan, timeline and budget,” in continued collaboration with the police and community. 

File / KBIA

A rural Missouri county is moving to a privatized system for public defenders, a system that some advocates would like to see become more common.

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The Columbia City Council unanimously approved a proposal Monday night to upgrade the water distribution infrastructure along Bryant and Switzler streets.  


American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the waning weeks of winter, one of North America’s most important game fishes begins to get active in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, walleye are on the move. 

 

These slender, yellowish or olive-brown fish have large mouths with prominent teeth, and especially reflective eyes. 

 

Residing in large streams and reservoirs throughout the state, these nocturnal fish feed in shallow water at night, and retreat to deeper pools during the day. 

 

Being a black student at MU, or any majority-white campus or institution, isn’t easy, but the culture is slowly changing for the better. That’s the takeaway from a recent in-studio conversation with MU Education professor Adrian Clifton and Law professor S. David Mitchell.

Credit Kevin Bradley / University of Missouri

Pesticide drift during the 2017 growing was historic -- about 3.6 million acres of soybeans were damaged by the weed killer dicamba. The Environmental Protection Agency and several states have slapped on stricter guidelines for the 2018 growing season, but enough damage has been done that stakeholders across the industry are worried that we've forced farmers into a cycle of always needing a stronger chemical to combat weeds that have grown resistant to what's already on shelves.

Today guest host James Mouser visits with MARY BETH MING about the continued effort by the Columbia King's Daughters & Sons to provide dental aide to low-income children attending Columbia Public Schools. In order to raise the necessary funds, they're putting on a benefit concert next Tuesday at First Baptist Church. Watch for details! At [5:48] director CLAIRE SYLER and actor HARVEY WILLIAMS invite everyone to come see the world premiere of "The Green Duck Lounge" this weekend at the Rhynsburger Theatre in Columbia. The story, by Kansas City-based playwright Michelle Tyrene Johnson, explores the real-life murder of civil rights activist Leon Jordan, and similarities between the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. February 20, 2018

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