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Courtesy Elliot Chapman

Farm Economy Braces For Another Year In The Red

Farmers across the Midwest are trying to figure out how to get by at a time when expected prices for commodities from corn, to wheat, to cattle, to hogs mean they’ll be struggling just to break even. “Prices are low, bins are full, and the dollar is strengthening as we speak and that’s just making the export thing a little more challenging,” says Paul Burgener of Platte Valley Bank in Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

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A passenger train leapt the tracks overnight in southeast India, killing at least 39 people and injuring more than 60. The derailment, which occurred near Kuneru station in the state of Andhra Pradesh, is the latest in a string of deadly wrecks to rack the Indian railway system.

The derailment threw several coaches of the Hirakhand Express train off its own tracks and onto an adjacent goods train.

Republicans plan to turn control of Medicaid over to the states as part of their replacement for the Affordable Care Act, according to an adviser to President Donald Trump.

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Missouri Women Struggle To Close Pay Gap

Flickr / nataliej

A report from the Women's Foundation and a University of Missouri researcher shows that women in Missouri continue to struggle to close the pay gap with men.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the foundation's 2015 Status of Women in Missouri was updated Thursday. The report found that women who work in the state full time earn 78 cents for every dollar that men who work in the state full time earn.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The new interim CEO of MU Health Care is Jonathan Curtright, its current Chief Operating Officer. Curtright, who holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Missouri, previously served as COO at Indiana University Health and University of Kentucky Healthcare.

Though the University of Missouri System has been the center of recent budget cuts and withholding, Curtright says he’s optimistic about the program’s fiscal outlook.

Rich Clarkson

Rich Clarkson is one of the founding fathers of modern sports photojournalism. Born in 1932, Clarkson's early photos of Wilt Chamberlain playing basketball at the University of Kansas in the 1950s were published in a new magazine called Sports Illustrated.

That launched a career that included photographing 60 NCAA men's basketball championships, nine Olympics and many, many other sports events.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Clarkson talks about how photojournalism has changed over the decades and the stories behind some of the most memorable sports photos of our time.

Today Paul Pepper and JACK SCHULTZ, Executive Director of the Bond Life Sciences Center, talk about genetic and contagious diseases and the basic research to finds their cures. Have you ever heard of penicillin? Sure you have; it was discovered by accident. How about a vaccine that will treat cancer cells, or a life-saving drug for Spinal Muscular Atrophy with origins at the University of Missouri? One could happen, the other already does. Jack explains it all - watch! January 20, 2017

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri Democrats are asking Gov. Eric Greitens to support their efforts to force the new leader of the state's consumer watchdog agency to resign.

House Democrats are pushing for the ouster of Dave Minnick, who was appointed last week by Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft to head of the secretary of state's securities division.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

The man who was the face of Ferguson, Missouri, in the turmoil that followed the 2014 fatal police shooting of Michael Brown has opposition in his re-election bid.

The St. Louis suburb announced Thursday that two candidates are running for mayor in the April 4 election — incumbent James Knowles III and councilwoman Ella Jones. The election is nonpartisan.

Knowles was elected to his first three-year term in 2011 and re-elected in April 2014. That August, white officer Darren Wilson fatally shot Brown, who was 18, black and unarmed.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  A bill prohibiting mandatory union fees in workplaces is moving to the Missouri Senate after winning House approval.

The 100-59 vote Thursday by the House comes after Republican supermajorities made the right-to-work law a priority for this year.

If the law passes, employees won't be required to pay union fees, even though the union may still be required to represent all employees.

Proponents say the laws give workers more freedom and will bring more jobs to Missouri. Opponents argue it will take power away from unions and lead to lower wages.

flickr

  A Missouri man who was fatally shot during a traffic stop was accused of exchanging gunfire with a state trooper days earlier.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol identified the man killed Wednesday as 35-year-old Troy Bateman, of Marshall. Investigators are trying to determine whether officers shot the man or if he suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound. An autopsy is being conducted.

The patrol says the confrontation began when Columbia police pulled over a car. Two women got out of the vehicle, and police fired at the car after they heard a gunshot.

Thomas Hawk / flickr

  A federal appeals court has revived a lawsuit challenging Missouri regulations limiting how alcohol producers and retailers can advertise.

An 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel on Thursday unanimously reinstated the 2013 lawsuit by the Missouri Broadcasters Association, a radio group, a retailer and winery.

U.S. District Judge Fernando Gaitan dismissed the lawsuit last year at the state's behest.

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