Via the PlanetReuse website

Don’t waste what can be used to sustain—that’s the idea behind PlanetReuse, a Kansas City-based company that helps contractors exchange reclaimed construction materials that would otherwise be headed to the landfill. Missouri Business Alert’s Yizhu Wang sat down with founder and CEO Nathan Benjamin at Columbia’s Sustainapalooza to talk about the firm and what it means to be the self-described “go-to solution for reuse.”

Some citizens of Columbia's first ward are looking to recall their recently elected council member, Ginny Chadwick.

Gov. Jay Nixon announces the creation of the Ferguson Commission to study the social and education conditions that led to the shooting death of Michael Brown. Why is the governor doing this now? Also, how the media covered the Keene, New Hampshire Pumpkin Fest unrest, a battle between the National Association of Black Journalists and CNN, the Associated Press runs advertising through its Twitter account and claims a gubernatorial candidate sidelined a political reporter. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

This Halloween, what better way to one-up your friends than mixing up some batter, swapping out your light bulbs for ultraviolet replacements, and showing off some glowing baked goods?

And, if you follow the advice of Steven Johnson and Martina Zupanic, these treats won't leave you feeling regretful the next day about your eating choices.

Thinking Out Loud: Richard King's Blue Note memories

Oct 22, 2014
Matt McCormack, Columbia Missourian

On this week's Thinking Out Loud, we go way back into the program’s archives for an interview from 2005 with Richard King, who recently sold The Blue Note club in Columbia. At the time, Richard and The Blue Note were celebrating their 25th anniversary.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • How much foodborne illnesses cost the US.
  • iPads are being used to help learning at the South Callaway County schools.
  • A judge plans to rule against Ameren Corp. over a proposed high voltage power line.

In partnership with the Institute of Public Policy at MU, the Women’s Foundation of Kansas City is collecting information about Missouri women for a public database, including things like income and employment, education, childcare and health.  I spoke with Wendy Doyle, President and CEO of the Women’s Foundation, about how the project could have an impact on women's issues in Missouri.

KBIA file photo

Gov. Jay Nixon announced a plan to create a Ferguson Commission on Tuesday.  The newly-formed panel is charged with studying the social and economic conditions that led to the August shooting death of unarmed teen Michael Brown.

Why is Nixon doing this now? How might the timing be influenced by a New York Times report detailing leaks of evidence presented to the grand jury investigating the case that supports Officer Darren Wilson's recollection of events?

PM Newscast for October 21, 2014

Oct 21, 2014
Columbia Police Department logo
File Photo / KBIA

COLUMBIA - Columbia Police have no new information about a shot fired incident that occurred this morning on a street near Our Lady of Lourdes causing the lockdown of the school.

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School in Columbia was placed on lockdown after a shot was fired on a nearby street about 11:30. The lockdown was lifted around 1 this afternoon when police notified school officials there that the incident had been resolved.

Baseballs
paul.hadsall / Flickr

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The mayors of Kansas City and San Francisco have a bet riding on the outcome of the World Series.

If the Royals take the crown, San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee will travel to Kansas City to read to students. If the Giants prevail, Kansas City Mayor Sly James will serve meals to the homeless in San Francisco and sing with a church musical group.

Wendy Brumbaugh

Not so long ago, Charles Sharpe said God told him to build a Christian communal society in Shelby County. More than one hundred fifty years before, Wilhelm Keil said he came to the same place the same way.

   Walter Kamphoefner said that conviction is why Kiel’s colony survived when other organized communities failed. He studies 19th century German colonization of the West at Texas A&M.

   “I mean there were a couple of organized groups that came in the 1830's but they ended up not being very successful, giving up their group organization very quickly. In fact, almost before arriving.”

KBIA

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says he will create an independent commission to study issues that have surfaced since the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

taylor.a / FLICKR

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The search for a new education commissioner in Missouri is causing friction between the state school board president and an association of school superintendents.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • A report from the Columbia City Council meeting last night.
  • MU will hold an open forum with one of the candidates for the open provost position.
  • A rivalry between radio stations over Lorde's "Royals" in advance of the World Series. 

With the first ever wild-card World Series about to begin, two radio stations in San Francisco and Kansas City have taken up a rivalry of their own.

After more than 80 minutes of public testimony, the Columbia City Council voted Monday night against a proposed ordinance that would have decriminalized the cultivation of medical and non-medical marijuana.

For a while, it appeared the ordinance would pass. 


For the past year, KBIA has been working on a special long-form story about a place in Northeast Missouri called Heartland. It’s a story with threads of religion, law, business, and morality that all end in a knot, in the middle of a cornfield.

    


  It’s harvest time in Mid-Missouri and students at some Columbia Public Schools are getting the opportunity to learn about the science behind their favorite foods. These new lessons are thanks to a partnership with the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture.

  Leemer Cernohlavek stood in the front of a classroom, scrolling through pictures of his apple orchard on the teacher’s smart board. He was describing his work to second and third graders, who sat quietly listening on a rainbow-colored square rug.

IMDB

  The movie "Gone Girl" put Missouri in the cinema spotlight. But the state might not be able to attract other major motion picture companies with the end of the film production tax incentive program.

The program, offered by the Department of Economic Development, began in 1999. Since the program expired last November, Missourians have been concerned that the expiration will prevent revenue and publicity for the state of Missouri.

Film production companies that qualified could earn a credit up to 35% of the expended amount.

Tasting the future of elderberry juice

Oct 20, 2014
David~O / Flickr

  MU researchers should start preparing their taste buds for a new study comparing different kinds of elderberry juices. The researchers received a grant from the US Department of Agriculture to examine the different juices and find “off” flavors in certain varieties of elderberries.

bsabarnowl / flickr

  The cities of Osage Beach and Lake Ozark have written a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency expressing community concerns regarding the proposed re-definition of the phrase "Water of the United States."  In Osage Beach, the new definition will affect 4,500 full time residents and over twice that many in vacation home owners. 

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • An update on the race for state auditor.
  • Two important issues on the November ballot, including teacher evaluations and budget-balancing powers.

The only statewide political office up for grabs in Missouri this year doesn't appear to be anywhere near up for grabs.

State Auditor Tom Schweich, a Republican, is facing only token opposition from the Libertarian and Constitution parties, and the Democrats are not fielding a challenger. This contest may serve more as a campaign for Schweich's next political goal:

CINCINNATI – Cincinnati’s police reform following a deadly police shooting and riots in 2001 has lessons for Ferguson and St. Louis. Here is what the reformers there say:

CitizenFour

Laura Poitras' documentary, CitizenFour, will screen in Columbian, Mo. on Sunday in conjunction with True/False. The film documents NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's meetings with journalists from the Guardian in a Hong Kong hotel room. Early reviews of the film are strong, and already there's Oscar talk buzzing around it.​ Could this film change public perception? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

For those who follow the video game industry and its community, feminist critic Anita Sarkeesian is a familiar figure. Her video series "Tropes vs Women in Video Games" analyzes how women are represented in games past and present.

In April, residents of Louisa County, Va., were shocked to learn of a sexting "ring" among the town's teenagers. When Hanna Rosin asked teens from Louisa County High School how many people they knew who had sexted, a lot of them replied: "Everyone." But what was originally characterized in the media as an organized criminal affair was soon revealed to be widespread teen behavior.

"I think we as a culture don't know whether to be utterly alarmed by sexting, or think of it as a normal part of teenage sexual experimentation," Rosin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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