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Missouri Gov. Greitens calls special legislative session on Noranda smelting plant

Updated May 19 with Gov. Eric Greitens' plans to campaign for the legislation — Missouri lawmakers will return to Jefferson City next week to consider legislation aimed at boosting the chances that the Noranda aluminum smelter plant will reopen and that a new steel plant will be built. Gov. Eric Greitens is holding four rallies Saturday to promote legislation he says will help both southeast Missouri projects. The session will begin at 4 p.m. Monday.

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The 'No Fun League' Relaxes End Zone Celebration Rules

59 minutes ago

The National Football League announced three changes to the game on Tuesday, but the one getting most of the attention has to do with end zone celebrations.

For years, the league has limited how players could celebrate following touchdowns, and for how long.

People often ask me: What's the best lesson you learned after almost two decades on the U.S. women's soccer team?

I'm fairly certain they want the secret formula to winning. Instead, I tell them, the best lesson I learned is actually a secret about life.

And that lesson came to me while watching my incredible teammates do their thing, on and off the field. Sure, I loved that they were amazing athletes, and we were winning World Cups and Olympics together. But I was most impressed that they were even more amazing human beings who led in a variety of ways.

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Today Paul Pepper visits with NADIA NAVARRETE-TINDALL about edible plants here in Missouri. The Lincoln University Native Plants program is hosting a free food tasting event this week featuring recipes that include (edible) native plants. Watch for details! At [4:25] MAKENZIE MABRY and JESS KANSMAN invite everyone to the next Science on Tap CoMo event tomorrow night at Craft Beer Cellar in downtown Columbia! Jess is one of two featured speakers; she'll be talking about how plants defend themselves against insect attacks. (Did you know that plants can call for help?!) May 23, 2017

A new documentary profiles efforts to provide healing for Joplin’s tornado-stricken city. The release of “Butterfly Angels” falls on the sixth anniversary of the storm.

The seven-minute film shows how many from Joplin and the surrounding area conceptualized and created a green space and a healing garden to help citizens deal with the trauma inflicted by the tornado. It was produced by Stoneworth Studios with the TKF Foundation.

161 people were killed after the tornado swept through the city on May 22, 2011.

Missouri School of Journalism

 Let’s take a couple of minutes to celebrate the accomplishments of the 99th Missouri General Assembly, which finished its 2017 session a week ago.

We won’t need much more time than that.

Our elected representatives passed a record-low number of bills. That is almost certainly a good thing, considering the import of most of those that were sent to Gov. Greitens. 

Still, there is cause for celebration. That cause begins with the legislators’ agreement to defy the governor and fully fund the K-12 public school Foundation Formula for the first time. Even there, we have to note that they trimmed down the formula from its original scale. But this action stands out as by far the most significant victory for their constituents... 

Read the complete column at the Missourian.

 

The Archdiocese of St. Louis and the city are in a legal showdown over new provisions in St. Louis' anti-discrimination law regarding women's reproductive decisions. The archdiocese's schools and a private company, O'Brien Industrial Holdings, on Monday in federal court filed a lawsuit challenging a St. Louis ordinance that they say adds abortion rights supporters to a protected class, while discriminating those who are against abortions.

Today Paul Pepper visits with TAMI HARRIS, RN, about the warning signs and symptoms of a stroke. May is 'Stroke Awareness Month,' and so MU Health Care wants us all to know what it means to think 'FAST' - it could save your life. At [3:28] actress LACEY WILLIAMS and director BRIAN HARPER invite everyone to come see "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" at The Little Theatre of Jefferson City. In describing this fun, family-friendly show, Brian says that there's "no serious message; it's the cartoon strips on the stage." The curtain goes up on June 8th in the Capital city! May 22, 2017

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has named a longtime banker as the acting director of the state's Division of Financial Institutions.

The governor announced in a news release Friday that Lee Keith will be the state's new finance director.

Keith was the former president of Gold Bank in St. Joseph, Missouri, and also led banks in Sullivan, Springfield, and Columbia, Missouri. He recently led a turnaround effort for Mercantile Bank in Quincy, Illinois.

Keith's appointment will be subject to Senate confirmation.

students in classroom
Rachel Rice / KBIA

Missouri school districts are looking forward to the possibility of more funding for early childhood education next year.

Lawmakers this year, for the first time in recent memory, hit their self-imposed target for school funding at roughly $3.4 billion. That triggers a law that requires the state to spend more next year on pre-K education.

It's a move that Republicans have lauded as a monumental step for education. But some educators and lawmakers question whether the state can afford it.

Updated 7:45 p.m. May 22  with number of bills filed Monday – On the eve of his first legislative special session, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens and his allied nonprofit group are attacking one of the pivotal legislators  needed to win approval of the governor’s favored bill.

The nonprofit group is called A New Missouri and can collect unlimited donations from unidentified donors. It is targeting state Sen. Doug Libla, a Republican whose southeast Missouri district includes the now-closed aluminum smelting plant that Greitens hopes to reopen, along with a possible steel mill.

Libla says he supports the projects. But the senator questions some provisions in the expected special-session bill that he says could reduce state oversight over Ameren, which provides electricity to much of eastern Missouri.

Six clergymen who were found guilty of trespassing in the Missouri Senate gallery after they protested Missouri’s failure to expand Medicaid were sentenced today to one year of unsupervised probation.

The six, including well-known Kansas City clergymen Sam Mann, Wallace Hartzfield Sr. and Vernon P. Howard Jr., were part of the so-called Medicaid 23, who were charged with trespassing and obstructing government operations after leading a group of about 300 protestors in the Senate gallery three years ago.

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