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Supreme Court Rules Religious School Can Use Taxpayer Funds For Playground

Updated at 7 p.m. ET The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that taxpayer-funded grants for playgrounds available to nonprofits under a state program could not be denied to a school run by a church. "The consequence is, in all likelihood, a few extra scraped knees. But the exclusion of Trinity Lutheran from a public benefit for which it is otherwise qualified, solely because it is a church, is odious to our Constitution all the same, and cannot stand," Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the...

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We can’t let it go. Why, despite all the dashcam video, do police who kill civilians keep walking out of the courtroom free men?

The United Nations declared 2017 the International Year of Sustainable Tourism — just in time for the Adventure Junky travel app. Part environmental guide, part social planner, the app offers sustainability-minded adventurers the tools to find off-the-beaten-path travel experiences, or to revel in those experienced by others.

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Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision involving a Missouri church ultimately could make it easier for religious institutions to seek out state money for non-religious needs.

The justices ruled 7-2 in favor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbia, which had sought a state grant to put a soft surface on its preschool playground, but was denied funding. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote it is “odious to our Constitution” to exclude the church from the grant program.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. with comment from Louis Gerteis  — The Confederate Memorial will be removed from St. Louis' Forest Park this week, likely by Wednesday.

The Missouri Civil War Museum and the city of St. Louis settled a lawsuit last week over who owns the memorial, though the action wasn’t announced until Monday morning. The museum will cover the cost of removing and storing the statue, as well as finding an appropriate place to display it — but it can’t be in St. Louis or St. Louis County.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back the Boone County Hams! They're teaming up with the African Children's Choir for a special concert this Wednesday at First Baptist Church in Columbia. Before they take the stage, the Hams perform three songs for us: "I'm Gonna Live Till I Die" [1:48]; "I Believe" [3:29]; and "Yes Sir, That's My Baby" [7:12]. June 26, 2017

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The University of Missouri Libraries is asking book lovers for some help.

Library officials have a wish list of more than 400 books that they hoped to buy but are not able to because of budget cuts.

Klaw101.com

The number of Missouri House races lacking major-party opposition has been on the rise.

An analysis by The Associated Press of last fall's elections found that 60 percent of Missouri House races lacked a Republican or Democratic candidate — ranking in the top tier of states nationally.

After the difficult process this year of piecing together Missouri’s budget, lawmakers believe they’ve found a way to get more money for vital state services: Cutting tax credits.

But a report from state Auditor Nicole Galloway’s office shows that even with big changes to popular incentives, it could be years before the state saves a significant amount of money.

Crumbling roads and old bridges have long been something lawmakers say they should work on.

Now, a task force created to study Missouri's transportation system will begin holding public meetings this week.

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including:

·      University of Missouri Revokes Cosby's Honorary Degree

·      MU to Rent Out Vacant Residence Halls, Tackle Declining Enrollment


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The University of Missouri's Board of Curators has voted unanimously to revoke an honorary degree it granted to Bill Cosby.

University system President Mun Choi recommended that the board strip the comedian of a doctorate in humane letters he received in 1999. Choi cited allegations from several women that Cosby sexually assaulted them. Choi says Cosby's actions do not reflect the university's values.

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