Provided by Gary Carmack

Overdose Antidote Bill Falls Short Due to Senate Stalemate

A House bill that would have allowed anyone to possess and administer naloxone, a drug that reverses opiate overdoses and “brings people back from the dead,” was one of the victims of the Senate stalemate at the end of the 2015 Legislative session. The drug is perhaps better known by its brand name of Narcan. Last July, Gov. Jay Nixon signed a bill that allows law enforcement to carry Narcan in their vehicles and administer the drug at the scene of an overdose. This is much like what paramedics have done throughout the state for many years. But some legislators, advocates and law enforcement believe that putting Narcan in the hands of friends and family of addicts would be more effective at saving lives.
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Jay Ashcroft, Twitter

Jay Ashcroft, a Republican candidate for Missouri secretary of state, is pushing an initiative petition that would allow the Legislature to require voters to present photo identification at the polls.

The St. Louis attorney filed a proposed constitutional amendment with the secretary of state's office on Thursday. This amendment would permit voter photo ID requirements.

Joplin tornado damage
Matt Evans / KBIA

A fund for victims of the 2011 Joplin tornado has closed after distributing nearly $1 million to residents and nonprofits.

The Joplin City Council this week commended the board of trustees of the Joplin Tornado First Response Fund for their work.

The fund gave out $998,201 in assistance after the tornado, which killed 161 and destroyed thousands of homes and hundreds of businesses.

The Joplin Globe reports city documents show the fund received donations ranging from just $1 to $119,000 from people throughout the world.

Dr.Farouk / Flickr

Last weekend, around 100 students graduated from the University of Missouri School of Medicine.  

 

But four times that many doctors will commit suicide this year in the United States.

 

Many believe problems with depression and anxiety in medical students is a leading cause for the mental health issues among physicians. Rep. Keith Frederick, R-Rolla, said these issues can also effect a doctor's ability to practice.

 

"Some doctors end up taking their own lives, but many go on practicing in a state where they're not as effective as they would be if they were completely healthy," said Frederick, who is also an orthopedic surgeon. "The healthcare provided by those physicians in training and future physicians will be much better if they aren't themselves suffering from depression.

 


Provided by Gary Carmack

A House bill that would have allowed anyone to possess and administer naloxone, a drug that reverses opiate overdoses and “brings people back from the dead,” was one of the victims of the Senate stalemate at the end of the 2015 Legislative session.

The drug is perhaps better known by its brand name of Narcan. Last July, Gov. Jay Nixon signed a bill that allows law enforcement to carry Narcan in their vehicles and administer the drug at the scene of an overdose. This is much like what paramedics have done throughout the state for many years.

But some legislators, advocates and law enforcement believe that putting Narcan in the hands of friends and family of addicts would be more effective at saving lives.


Today Paul Pepper visits with VAL GERMANN, Central Missouri Astronomical Association, about the distance between planets Venus and Jupiter and how, to us, they will appear to be touching! Plus, Val has brought more photos to share - watch! May 21, 2015

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

forwardstl / flickr

Missouri's unemployment rate increased slightly to 5.7 percent last month while the economy lost several thousand jobs.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

Recent heavy rains have pushed the Missouri River above flood stage at several locations in Missouri.

David Sapp

The Booneslick Trail was a pathway for westward migration in the years before Missouri statehood. In this episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talks with local historian David Sapp about the origins of the trail, how it helped form a boomtown and the local effort to keep the vestiges of the Booneslick Trail from disappearing under the plow or from being developed.


Afternoon Webcast for May 20, 2015

May 20, 2015

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

 


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