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Kimberly Ruiz, left, stands over a head lower than her partner, Lonnie Kessler, right. She wears dark, black-rimmed glasses, they both wear bright green NORML shirts and smile into the camera.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

'One of My Biggest Worries is that I'm Not Going to Get to Say Goodbye Because You Can't Hear Me.'

Lonnie Kessler and Kimberly Ruiz are a couple that lives in Moberly. Lonnie has intractable epilepsy and Kimberly is a disabled vet – and they both advocate for the legalization of medical marijuana in the state. They sat down at the Little Dixie Regional Library in Moberly, and spoke about their relationship and about how both of them having disabilities has influenced and strengthened their relationship. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .

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Pakistan says it has avoided landing on a list of global terror funders, despite efforts by the United States and Western allies.

The Financial Action Task Force, a global group against terrorism financing, was convened this week in Paris at the request of Western powers seeking to add Pakistan back on its terror-finance watch list.

When McDonald's recently announced the introduction of a vegan burger in Sweden and Finland, Twitter responded with a mix of earnest enthusiasm (@themodvegan: "So exciting- I hope we're next"), a little disgust (@JenaRoberta: "why would a vegan ever...support a company that sells millions of dead cow burgers a day?), and a touch of guilty hand-wringing from aging ideologues (@siniauer: "Feels like I'm cheating the 90's me").

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The Columbia City Council unanimously approved a proposal Monday night to upgrade the water distribution infrastructure along Bryant and Switzler streets.  


American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times.

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the waning weeks of winter, one of North America’s most important game fishes begins to get active in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, walleye are on the move. 

 

These slender, yellowish or olive-brown fish have large mouths with prominent teeth, and especially reflective eyes. 

 

Residing in large streams and reservoirs throughout the state, these nocturnal fish feed in shallow water at night, and retreat to deeper pools during the day. 

 

Being a black student at MU, or any majority-white campus or institution, isn’t easy, but the culture is slowly changing for the better. That’s the takeaway from a recent in-studio conversation with MU Education professor Adrian Clifton and Law professor S. David Mitchell.

Both Clifton and Mitchell work on the frontlines to improve the education experience for African-American students, and they joined The Green Duck Lounge playwright Michelle Tyrene Johnson at KBIA recently as part of a podcast for the project, designed to promote awareness and dialogue about Missouri’s civil rights history and current activism.


Credit Kevin Bradley / University of Missouri

Pesticide drift during the 2017 growing was historic -- about 3.6 million acres of soybeans were damaged by the weed killer dicamba. The Environmental Protection Agency and several states have slapped on stricter guidelines for the 2018 growing season, but enough damage has been done that stakeholders across the industry are worried that we've forced farmers into a cycle of always needing a stronger chemical to combat weeds that have grown resistant to what's already on shelves.

Today guest host James Mouser visits with MARY BETH MING about the continued effort by the Columbia King's Daughters & Sons to provide dental aide to low-income children attending Columbia Public Schools. In order to raise the necessary funds, they're putting on a benefit concert next Tuesday at First Baptist Church. Watch for details! At [5:48] director CLAIRE SYLER and actor HARVEY WILLIAMS invite everyone to come see the world premiere of "The Green Duck Lounge" this weekend at the Rhynsburger Theatre in Columbia. The story, by Kansas City-based playwright Michelle Tyrene Johnson, explores the real-life murder of civil rights activist Leon Jordan, and similarities between the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. February 20, 2018

Early detection and intervention is key for children diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Findings from a team of MU researcher may aid in earlier and more accurate detection of autism.

MU researchers have identified specific pairs of genes common in children on the autism spectrum. Using a computer program designed by MU College of Engineering researcher Chi-Ren Shyu, the team found 286 genes among children diagnosed with 12 different variations of autism.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has hired former St. Louis Judge Jack Garvey to represent him during an investigation to determine if he broke any laws while having an extramarital affair.

St. Louis Public Radio reports Garvey confirmed Sunday that he was hired last week to represent the governor during St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner's investigation.

Garvey declined to say who is paying him. He also wouldn't say if he's being added to the legal team or replacing one of Greitens' current lawyers.

KBIA/file photo

The Missouri House has passed a bill to ban marriages of children under 15 years old.

House members voted 95-50 Monday to send the bill to the Senate. Backers say it would help stop abuse through coerced marriages, while opponents argue it would take away parents' rights to decide whether to allow their children to marry.

Children ages 15-17 now can get married with a parent's permission. Those younger than 15 need approval from a judge.

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