Health Coverage Remains Out Of Reach For Many Low-Income Immigrants

When 85-year-old retired farmworker and grandmother Amparo Mejia needed surgery on her spine because of a rare form of tuberculosis, she was able to pay for the procedure through emergency Medicaid. She was lucky. For many low-income immigrants – even those authorized to work in the US – it can be challenging or outright impossible to get health insurance.
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Missouri State Highway Patrol

The Missouri State Highway Patrol says one of its troopers has died in a crash in northeast Missouri.

Trooper James M. Bava, 25, died when his vehicle crashed on Missouri Route FF in rural Audrain County. 

Cpl. Scott White says it's unclear how the accident happened. He says the trooper was following a motorcycle before the crash. His patrol vehicle was found after he did not respond to radio calls.

The motorcycle has not been found.

Karrie Banaghan / flickr

St. Louis' top elected officials are discussing whether to purchase body cameras for the city's police force, but finding money for the technology that's estimated to cost up to $2 million appears elusive.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that no action was taken on the issue at the Thursday meeting of the three-member Board of Estimate and Apportionment.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

 

To the chagrin of some of the nation’s largest farm organizations, the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday forged ahead with a plan to oversee more of the nation’s waterways, saying it will enforce new pollution rules in all but 13 states covered by an ongoing court case.

On the day the so-called “Waters of the U.S.” rules, or WOTUS, were set to go into effect, the EPA stuck to the deadline, despite a court order issued late Thursday.

Credit: Seth Barr

For over ten years, Thinking Out Loud has been a staple heard at 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday on KBIA. On this week's episode, producer Darren Hellwege shares selections from a decade of music and poetry performance as heard on Thinking Out Loud.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Heroin continues to be a serious problem throughout the county. The Centers for Disease Control released data earlier this month that showed heroin use increasing among nearly every group – age, income, gender, etc. And according to the CDC’s report, the rate of heroin-related overdose deaths heave nearly quadrupled between 2002 and 2013.

The White House announced earlier this month that it was determined to do something about this problem. It introduced the Heroin Response Strategy, which works to promote public health and public safety partnerships through a 15-state area. This new project aims to focus more on treating heroin addicts than on punishing them.


Courtesy NPR

As a co-host of NPR's flagship "All Things Considered," Audie Cornish's voice is heard by 12 million people everyday. On a special edition of Global Journalist, she takes us behind the scenes of one of the most influential radio shows in the U.S. and talks about the future of public radio.

Today Paul Pepper visits with JOAN STACK, Curator of Art Collections at The State Historical Society of Missouri, about their latest exhibit: "John James Audubon Paper Menagerie." Check out the sneak preview Joan has brought to the set, and then join a curator-lead tour of Audubon's "massive books" TOMORROW afternoon! August 28, 2015

Gov. Jay Nixon is facing explicit warnings from key legislators that they won’t approve payments on bonds for a new football stadium on St. Louis’ riverfront if they aren’t first approved by a legislative or public vote.

But the Democratic governor is dismissing the threats as too little, too late – pointing to inaction during the past legislative session.

As of today, there are 92 new laws on the books in Missouri.

All of them were passed by the Missouri House and Senate during the 2015 regular session, and all but two were signed by Governor Jay Nixon.  Lawmakers passed Senate Bill 24 by overriding Nixon's veto.  The new law shortens the lifetime eligibility for welfare recipients in Missouri from five years to three years and nine months.  Although most of the provisions in SB24 officially takes effect today, the shorter eligibility period won't kick in until January 1st, 2016.

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