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Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media and KBIA

How Midwest Farmers Can Fight ‘Dead Zone’ in Gulf

Farming in the fertile Midwest is tied to an environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. But scientists are studying new ways to lessen the Midwest’s environmental impact and improve water quality. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasts the so-called “dead zone,” an area of sea without enough oxygen to support most marine life, to grow larger than the size of Connecticut, or roughly 6,000 square miles.
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As the secretary of Jefferson City's Old Munichberg Association, Walter Schroeder would regularly 'spice-up' his meeting minutes. After much encouragement from fellow members of the group, he recently published Southside Sketches, a book of memories from Jefferson City's historic German neighborhood. Schroeder was a recent guest on KBIA's Thinking Out Loud.  

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A month after the first day of class in Columbia, two black student organizations and one student blogger at the University of Missouri threw an event to help freshmen fit in to their new student life on campus. Around 80 people, including organizers and older students, attended the "Black @ Mizzou" meeting in the Black Culture Centre.

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One officer said the Columbia Police Department won’t change its procedures much in response to Missouri’s new concealed carry regulations. Officer Jeff Forck spoke with local media an event Wednesday.

Missouri’s new regulations, which go into effect Jan. 1, will make it easier for Missourians to carry a concealed weapon.

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  Videos obtained by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch provide new insight into a fatal 2011 police shooting that led to first-degree murder charges this year against a white officer, who was carrying a personal assault rifle.

Jason Stockley, who is white, was charged in May in the Dec. 20, 2011, death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man who was shot and killed after a chase.

A federal judge has prohibited the release of videos and police reports by lawyers who obtained it as part of a civil case.

marijuana
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A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

On a gray day, just as the rain begins to fall, Roger Zylstra stops his red GMC Sierra pick-up truck on the side of the road and hops down into a ditch in Jasper County, Iowa. It takes two such stops before he unearths amid the tall weeds and grasses what he’s looking for.

“Here is one of the tiles,” he says, pointing to a pipe about six or eight inches in diameter. Water trickles from it into a culvert that runs under the road after flowing through a network of underground drainage lines below his farm field. “That’s where it outlets.”

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden? Also, have we seen the end of the birther movement, Megyn Kelly’s new role of producer,and how a journalist’s skills could be used to teach life skills.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Rich Egger / Harvest Public Media

Sandy Songer of Broken Bow, Oklahoma, has a bit of advice for anyone who wants to watch chainsaw artists in action.

“If you’re going to stay around us very long, you need to put some earplugs in,” she says with a laugh, as chainsaws revved and roared behind her like race cars, drowning out everything else in the background.

From carnival barkers, to Ferris wheels humming, to snorts and moos of livestock shows, late-summer state and county fairs are noisy, chaotic affairs. Add to the din this season: chainsaws buzzing.

 

Today Paul Pepper visits with ADAM SAUNDERS about this Sunday's Columbia CROP Hunger Walk at Stephens Lake Park! The purpose of the walk is to raise money and awareness for local organizations that help combat hunger and poverty, so consider sponsoring a neighbor, a friend or even yourself! At [3:45] LYNN BARNETT and SALLY SILVERS join us to talk about the many facets of the Columbia Public Schools Foundation. This now 20 year-old program aims to "stimulate creativity and innovation" beyond what our tax dollars alone can do. Watch for details! September 21, 2016

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