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Icy Rivers In Midwest Impeding Grain Bound For Export

The recent frigid weather across the Midwest has slowed river barges carrying grain to shipment ports, especially those destined for the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi, Ohio and Illinois rivers.

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Saturday saw protesters take to the streets from New York to Los Angeles — from Nigeria to Iraq. Various incarnations of the second annual Women's March demanded social change, promoted female empowerment and declared a resistance to President Trump on the anniversary of his inauguration.

Turkey on Sunday continued a major attack inside northwestern Syria on a Kurdish militia it has called a "terror army" that presents a danger to Turkish security.

One day earlier Turkey sent tanks and armored vehicles lumbering across the border with Syria to add to artillery and aerial invasions already underway against the YPG, which Ankara seeks to drive out of the Afrin region of Syria.

Turkey also announced Saturday that the aerial component of its "Operation Olive Branch" had struck 108 YPG targets, as NPR's Peter Kenyon tells our newscast unit.

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States including Missouri are banding together to promote civil rights tourism across the region.

Fourteen states including all of the Deep South are joining to promote the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. It's a tourism website and campaign that will highlight about 130 sites linked to the modern civil rights movement.

The joint effort is being unveiled as part of the MLK holiday weekend.

Today Paul Pepper visits with STEPHANIE SHONEKAN and BRIAN BOOTON, MLK Planning Committee Members, about two events celebrating the life and message of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The first event, a free showing of the film "Harvest of Empire," is TODAY at Ragtag Cinema; the second event, a talk by activist and author Junot Díaz, is next Monday at Jesse Auditorium. Watch for details! January 15, 2018

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A lawsuit alleging that a Republican Missouri senator was violating the state's open records law has been dismissed.

The Kansas City Star reports that a Cole County judge dismissed the lawsuit against Sen. Rob Schaaf of St. Joseph on Wednesday. The judge ruled that the judicial branch doesn't have jurisdiction over the case.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens appears to be bracing for a fight to preserve his political life after admitting to an extramarital affair but denying anything more.

Greitens met Thursday with Cabinet members and placed calls to rally support while his attorney issued firm denials to a smattering of allegations related to the affair. Among other things, Greitens' attorney is denying any violence, revealing photos or attempted blackmail.

Today Paul Pepper visits with LYNN ROSSY, Health Psychologist, about the 4th annual Mindful Eating Day! The theme this year is 'compassionate self-care to promote health and well-being', and you're invited to watch via two live broadcasts featuring interviews with knowledgeable practitioners. It all happens on January 25th. Watch for details! January 12, 2018

Hair braiders in Missouri have lost an appeal over a state requirement that they must be licensed like barbers and cosmetologists.

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday affirmed a lower court ruling in St. Louis that upheld the Missouri law.

A former middle-school football coach convicted of abducting and killing a 10-year-old Missouri girl has been sentenced to death.

Circuit Judge Thomas Mountjoy sentenced 49-year-old Craig Wood on Thursday for the February 2014 death of Hailey Owens. Woods was convicted of first-degree murder in November but the jury couldn't decide whether to sentence him to death or life in prison without parole.

The fallout over Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ admitted affair and allegations of blackmail was swift, with the local prosecutor heeding Thursday's calls from Republicans and Democrats for an investigation, and some Democrats suggesting the governor should resign.

Columbia Honors Leaders in Diversity Efforts

Jan 11, 2018
Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KBIA

Lincoln University interim President Mike Middleton grew up in a segregated Mississippi. He lived through the lynching of Emmett Till, the Brown v. Board of Education decision and the March on Washington.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, we take a step back from international news to hear from Leonard Pitts Jr., a Pulitzer-winning syndicated columnist for the Miami Herald.

Pitts is well-known liberal critiques of the Trump administration as well as his columns covering race, gay rights, religion and other cultural issues. His column on Sept. 12, 2001 called “We’ll Go Forward From This Moment,” is particularly well-known for directly addressing the perpetrators of the Sept. 11 attacks. In addition to the Pulitzer, Pitts has won numerous journalism awards from groups like the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for Professional Journalists - and most recently a 2017 honor medal from the Missouri School of Journalism.


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