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McCaskill helps Clinton make history in Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA – U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill admitted that she cast Missouri’s votes at Democratic National Convention with a bit of emotion.Missouri’s senior senator was given the honor of announcing how the Show Me State was divvying its delegates. It was part of a roll call vote that made Hillary Clinton the first female presidential candidate of a major party.
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PHILADELPHIA – U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill admitted that she cast Missouri’s votes at Democratic National Convention with a bit of emotion.

Missouri’s senior senator was given the honor of announcing how the Show Me State was divvying its delegates. It was part of a roll call vote that made Hillary Clinton the first female presidential candidate of a major party.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Among the members of the Squirrel Family living in Missouri, you’ll most likely see Eastern gray and fox squirrels.


Commentary: The Art of the Acceptance Speech

Jul 26, 2016

I am not a convention junkie.  Mostly I read the day after about what went on.  But I do watch two events live: the presidential nominee acceptance speeches.

At the conclusion of each speech I turn off the TV and write down my impressions.  I am not interested in what the talking heads have to say.  Sometimes the next morning when I catch the analyses I wonder aloud: “Did those people watch the same speech I did?”

Today Paul Pepper visits with KELLY SMITH about River City Habitat for Humanity's 100th home, now under construction in Jefferson City. For an organization that's only 25 years old, Kelly says that "...to be getting to our 100th home at this point is a big accomplishment." Find out what their plans are for the next 100! At [4:27] father and son acting duo CHRIS and NATHAN HEESE invite everyone to come see them and the rest of the cast in Maplewood Barn Theatre's production of "Oliver!," opening this Thursday in Columbia! July 26, 2016

Alex Hanson / Flickr

Some Missouri delegates to the Democratic National Convention who supported the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders are reluctant to heed his call to now back the likely Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton. 

Joe Gratz / Flickr

A federal judge has chosen a monitor team to oversee reforms of Ferguson's policing and court system.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry announced Monday that Squire Patton Boggs, a law firm based in Cleveland, was picked from four finalists to make sure reforms are adequate in the St. Louis suburb. 

PHILADELPHIA – Ralph Trask doesn’t want Donald Trump to become president. But that doesn’t mean he’s completely sold on Hillary Clinton.

Trask is a farmer from Iron County who is attending the Democratic National Convention as a Bernie Sanders delegate. He arrived in Philadelphia amid a somewhat tense time between supporters of the two campaigns, and national speculation over whether Sanders supporters can work this fall for Clinton.

Missouri agriculture officials are looking into widespread misuse of pesticides in in the Bootheel region.

Judy Grundler is division director for plant industries within the state's Department of Agriculture. She told a state House committee on Thursday that there have been 115 complaints in four counties of pollution caused by pesticides in the past month alone.

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