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Mad Cow Disease Detected In Alabama

A case of mad cow disease has been found in a cow in Alabama. U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists confirmed Tuesday that an 11-year-old cow found in an Alabama livestock market suffered from the neurologic cattle disease, formally called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The animal “at no time presented a risk to the food supply, or to human health in the United States,” according to the USDA.

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The Missouri Senate is scheduled to debate a bill this week that would add new regulations for clinics providing abortions. Its supporters, including Gov. Eric Greitens, say these will protect the health and safety of Missouri women, but abortion rights advocates say the legislation is designed to deny access to safe and legal abortion. We talk with both sides about this bill and how the abortion debate plays out in Missouri, year after year.

"I did not collude, nor know of anyone else in the campaign who colluded, with any foreign government," President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner said in a statement ahead of a closed-door meeting Monday before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

He is also expected to meet Tuesday with the House Intelligence Committee. Both committees are conducting investigations into possible links between Trump associates and Russian officials during the 2016 presidential campaign.

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The University of Missouri System has closed its $10 million medical research institute as part of an effort to cut costs.

University spokesperson Christian Basi tells the Columbia Missourian that the decision to close the International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine will affect 17 full-time and part-time employees through layoffs and contract non-renewals.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. — Missouri state Rep. Courtney Curtis is blaming two thefts and bank errors for campaign-finance problems that prompted the Missouri Ethics Commission to fine him more than $114,000.

Missouri Department of Conservation

As we head into the middle of summer, keep an eye out in the woods for ripening blackberries.

Updated July 18 at 1:30 p.m. with comments from the ACLU of Missouri — The Missouri Human Rights Act does not provide protections for gender identity, the Missouri Court of Appeals reinforced Tuesday.

The 2-1 decision stems from a case in which a 17-year-old transgender boy in the Kansas City area sued because he was not allowed to use the boys' restroom or locker rooms at his high school.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back poet, author and Missouri's first poet laureate, WALTER BARGEN! Walter reads his poem, "Queen Anne's Lace," which he dedicates to the white lanky wild flower of the same name (it's actually a member of the carrot family!). Meet Walter in person next month in Ashland - watch for details! July 18, 2017

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A dispute over a common weed killer is turning neighbor against neighbor across much of farm country.

The furor surrounding the herbicide dicamba has quickly become the biggest controversy of its kind in U.S. agriculture. And it is even suspected as a factor in the death of a farmer who was allegedly shot by a worker from a nearby farm where the chemical had been sprayed.

Crops near many treated soybean fields have turned up with leaves that were cupped and crinkled.

$10 Million Medical Research Institute Closed by MU

Jul 18, 2017

COLUMBIA — The MU International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine was closed June 30 as part of the UM System's cost-cutting measures.

The institute, at 1514 Research Park Drive off Providence Road, has been on campus since 2009. The decision to close the institute was made last month, MU spokesman Christian Basi wrote in an email.

MU broke ground on the $10 million institute in 2008. The future of the building is still to be determined, but it is likely to be used as a research facility, Basi wrote.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — City leaders in Missouri's capital are hoping that new legislation will help rejuvenate the state's former prison and the largely dilapidated area around it.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Gov. Eric Greitens signed a measure last week turning over 32 acres of state-owned land to Jefferson City. The city plans to build roads, hotels and new housing in the shadow of the old Missouri State Penitentiary, which closed in 2004.

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