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Researchers in Germany have found that getting drunk is associated with abnormal heart rhythms.

Their study was conducted in a place teeming with potential research subjects.

Just six years after Portugal's 2011 financial bailout sparked protests and sent the country's young people abroad in search of work, the country is experiencing an economic revival.

Mario Mouraz was one of those who left Portugal looking for work. Now, after three years abroad, he's back, selling his own software to Lisbon hotels in the middle of a tourist boom.

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Letters: Relay Race, King Memorial

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: Time now for your letters.

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SIMON: Last week, we interviewed filmmaker Christoph Baaden about Oregon's near 200-mile relay race Hood to Coast.

CHRISTOPH BAADEN: There really isn't any kind of prize money or different medals for people finishing this thing first. It's just for the love of, I think, of running but more importantly, camaraderie.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: A federal regulator has filed a lawsuit against 17 financial firms - some of them the biggest names on Wall Street. The suit alleges misrepresentation and negligence in the sale of mortgage securities. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

There's a quote carved into the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on the National Mall: "I was a drum major for justice, peace, and righteousness."

Except, as poet Maya Angelou pointed out this week, it's not a quote. It's a concentrated paraphrase that takes a word here and there from a speech that begins with Dr. King saying that he didn't wanted to be lauded, but --

"If you want to say that I was a drum major," he began, "say that I was a drum major for justice ..."

Sybil Ludington: Paul Revere In A Skirt?

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: We've been motoring through the summer with our road trip Honey, Stop the Car. We're curious about those commemorative plaques and monuments in towns all over the country that honor local heroes or events. This morning - markers. Member station WSHU takes us to New York's Hudson River Valley and to a dramatic statue of a teenage girl from the Revolutionary War.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Israel is facing growing diplomatic isolation in its region. Yesterday, Turkey expelled the Israeli ambassador and other diplomats from Ankara, and the popular protest known as the Arab Spring have eroded Israel's ties with some other neighbors. To talk about all this we have James Hider on the line. He's a correspondent for the Times of London who is based in Jerusalem. James, thanks for being with us.

JAMES HIDER: Morning.

Football Gives Ailing Community Reason To Cheer

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: And perhaps this year nowhere is college football more important and long awaited than in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Back in April, a massive tornado ripped across town, killed dozens of people and destroyed thousands of buildings. A return to football in this football town is almost a return to normalcy, as Alabama Public Radio's Ryan Vasquez reports.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The country is facing two more major storms, just a week after Irene barreled up the East Coast. Tropical Storm Lee is already pelting parts of the Gulf Coast with rain, and Hurricane Katia is farther out in the Atlantic and threatening to hit in the next few days.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. In Libya, victorious rebels are struggling to organize themselves after taking over Tripoli and sending Moammar Gadhafi into hiding. There's a lack of water, medicine and basic supplies in the capital. A stabilization committee's been formed. Among its members is a man that NPR profiled last May. He's from the city of Misrata, west of Tripoli, that saw some of the bloodiest fighting of the Libyan War.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: The Big Dipper has a shiny new sequin on its handle, it's a supernova, the magnificent last hurrah of a star. This weekend is a rare opportunity for amateurs to see a supernova from Earth. People all over the country will be able to catch a glimpse of the fireball from their backyards, as it reaches peak brightness over the next few nights.

Peter Nugent is an astronomer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, joins us from a studio there.

Dr. Nugent, thanks for being with us.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

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SIMON: And I love sports. Perjury charges, bar brawls, speeding. In fact, I'm working on a TV pilot.

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SIMON: Law and Order: Sports. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us.

Hi there, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN: Hi, Scott.

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