Top Local News

Judge acquits ex-St. Louis officer Stockley of murder in 2011 shooting

Updated at 9:20 p.m. with the Post-Dispatch interview with Stockley — A former St. Louis Metropolitan Police officer is not guilty of first-degree murder in the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, a judge ruled Friday. "This Court, as the trier of fact, is simply not firmly convinced of defendant's guilt," St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson said in his verdict. "Agonizingly, this Court has poured over the evidence again and again." Immediately, protesters, who promised weeks of protests, amassed downtown. The St. Louis chapter of the NAACP called for the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department to review the case.

Read More

More News

Updated at 1:20 a.m. Sept. 18 with police, mayor news conference— More than 80 people were arrested Sunday night, St. Louis police said, long after the official — and peaceful — protests ended. The last group of people to be arrested downtown were boxed in by police and sprayed with a chemical agent, a livestream showed, and a St. Louis Post-Dispatch staffer tweeted that one of their reporters was among them.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit


Read and Listen to More Stories from NPR and KBIA

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

Voice Of America's Role In Internet Age

Sep 3, 2011



SCOTT SIMON, host: This week is the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, was coordinating the national relief effort in Hurricane Irene's wake. Texas congressman and Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul was calling for the agency's elimination. He said quote, "FEMA has one of the worst reputations for a bureaucracy ever. It's a system of bureaucratic central economic planning, which is a policy that is deeply flawed."

Not having a summer or after-school job affects more than just a kid's wallet. It also has real consequences for his or her personal and economic development.

While the overall unemployment rate is stuck at 9.1 percent, the unemployment rate for 16- to 19-year-olds has been going up since February. Currently 25.4 percent of teenagers who want jobs can't find them.

Letters: Relay Race, King Memorial

Sep 3, 2011


SCOTT SIMON, host: Time now for your letters.


SIMON: Last week, we interviewed filmmaker Christoph Baaden about Oregon's near 200-mile relay race Hood to Coast.

CHRISTOPH BAADEN: There really isn't any kind of prize money or different medals for people finishing this thing first. It's just for the love of, I think, of running but more importantly, camaraderie.


SCOTT SIMON, host: A federal regulator has filed a lawsuit against 17 financial firms - some of them the biggest names on Wall Street. The suit alleges misrepresentation and negligence in the sale of mortgage securities. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

There's a quote carved into the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on the National Mall: "I was a drum major for justice, peace, and righteousness."

Except, as poet Maya Angelou pointed out this week, it's not a quote. It's a concentrated paraphrase that takes a word here and there from a speech that begins with Dr. King saying that he didn't wanted to be lauded, but --

"If you want to say that I was a drum major," he began, "say that I was a drum major for justice ..."

Sybil Ludington: Paul Revere In A Skirt?

Sep 3, 2011


SCOTT SIMON, host: We've been motoring through the summer with our road trip Honey, Stop the Car. We're curious about those commemorative plaques and monuments in towns all over the country that honor local heroes or events. This morning - markers. Member station WSHU takes us to New York's Hudson River Valley and to a dramatic statue of a teenage girl from the Revolutionary War.


SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Israel is facing growing diplomatic isolation in its region. Yesterday, Turkey expelled the Israeli ambassador and other diplomats from Ankara, and the popular protest known as the Arab Spring have eroded Israel's ties with some other neighbors. To talk about all this we have James Hider on the line. He's a correspondent for the Times of London who is based in Jerusalem. James, thanks for being with us.


Football Gives Ailing Community Reason To Cheer

Sep 3, 2011


SCOTT SIMON, host: And perhaps this year nowhere is college football more important and long awaited than in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Back in April, a massive tornado ripped across town, killed dozens of people and destroyed thousands of buildings. A return to football in this football town is almost a return to normalcy, as Alabama Public Radio's Ryan Vasquez reports.