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Soon-To-Be Mothers In Missouri’s Bootheel Scramble To Find Care After Hospital Announces Closure

Taja Welton is ready for her daughter to be born. She’s moved into a bigger house, one with room for a nursery. She has a closet full of pink, Minnie Mouse-themed baby clothes. Her baby bag is packed right down to the outfit she plans to bring her baby home in that reads, “The Princess Has Arrived.” “I can’t wait to put it on her,” Welton smiles. The princess even has a name: Macen.

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Tuesday's primaries feature Democratic ideological and stylistic battles that could have a major impact on how competitive the party is in the fall general election. Top contests also feature Democratic women competing — sometimes against each other.

The "Stacey vs. Stacey" face-off in Georgia has drawn national attention as Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans run for governor on competing arguments over the best way to compete against Republicans — by just firing up the base or also trying to sway moderates.

Fifty years after his LOVE painting made Robert Indiana a sensation, the artist has died at age 89. Indiana's two-row rendering of the word, with its tilted "O," became one of the most recognizable works of modern art in the world.

The famous design emerged from deep influences in Indiana's life, from his early exposure to religion to his father's career.

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There's a quote carved into the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on the National Mall: "I was a drum major for justice, peace, and righteousness."

Except, as poet Maya Angelou pointed out this week, it's not a quote. It's a concentrated paraphrase that takes a word here and there from a speech that begins with Dr. King saying that he didn't wanted to be lauded, but --

"If you want to say that I was a drum major," he began, "say that I was a drum major for justice ..."

Sybil Ludington: Paul Revere In A Skirt?

Sep 3, 2011

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: We've been motoring through the summer with our road trip Honey, Stop the Car. We're curious about those commemorative plaques and monuments in towns all over the country that honor local heroes or events. This morning - markers. Member station WSHU takes us to New York's Hudson River Valley and to a dramatic statue of a teenage girl from the Revolutionary War.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: And I love sports. Perjury charges, bar brawls, speeding. In fact, I'm working on a TV pilot.

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This week, we take a look at the tricky link between farm policy and obesity. Plus, the State Veterinarian talks about what his office does – and why it’s important.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Even more global journalism at the official website.

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