computers http://kbia.org en "Computer Chess" shows the dawn of the digital age http://kbia.org/post/computer-chess-dawn-digital-age <p><i style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: normal;">This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.&nbsp; Find the rest of them&nbsp;</i><a href="http://www.kbia.org/programs/truefalse-conversations"><i style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: normal;">here</i></a><i style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;or&nbsp;</i><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/true-false-conversations-filmmaker/id607158264"><i style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: normal;">download the podcast</i></a><i style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;on iTunes.</i></p><p>In 1997, a computer beat a human at chess for the first time. &nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Gary </span>Kasparov<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> was reputedly the best chess player of his time but an IBM program named Deep Blue wore him down. It was a landmark moment for technology and is one of the seminal moments of the digital age. Director Andrew </span>Bujalski<span style="line-height: 1.5;">, most famous for inaugurating the </span><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumblecore" style="line-height: 1.5;">“Mumblecore”</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> genre in the </span>1990s<span style="line-height: 1.5;">—wanted to find the root of that moment, and it took him to the obscure nerd culture of the late </span>1970s<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> and early </span>1980s<span style="line-height: 1.5;">.</span></p><p> Wed, 27 Feb 2013 19:18:01 +0000 Scott Pham 29530 at http://kbia.org "Computer Chess" shows the dawn of the digital age Como Gadget Works: Columbia's own hackerspace http://kbia.org/post/como-gadget-works-columbias-own-hackerspace <p>When you imagine a hacker, you&rsquo;re probably thinking of someone banging away at a keyboard, doing something shadowing and illegal on the internet. &nbsp;These days a lot of hackers are banding together, and it&rsquo;s far from illegal. &nbsp;They&rsquo;re forming groups called hackerspaces--community workshops where hackers (some of whom prefer the term &ldquo;makers&rdquo;) get together to build robots, modify electronics and socialize.</p> Fri, 25 May 2012 21:02:07 +0000 Scarlett Robertson & Scott Pham 14797 at http://kbia.org Como Gadget Works: Columbia's own hackerspace