telehealth http://kbia.org en Rural Reads: On osteopathic physicians and access to insurance http://kbia.org/post/rural-reads-osteopathic-physicians-and-access-insurance <p></p><p><em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Every Friday, </span>KBIA’s<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Health and Wealth Desk curates the week’s most interesting (or so we think) articles and reports on rural health, wealth and society issues.</span></em></p><p><strong>Osteopathic Physicians: An Answer To Rural Health Care Needs? </strong></p><p>It’s no secret the <a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/20/where-have-all-the-primary-care-doctors-gone/">U.S. is facing a shortage of primary care physician</a>s – especially in rural areas,&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">which is home to some 20 percent of all Americans, but only has 9 percent of all physicians</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">. Compared to specialized medicine such as surgery and cardiology, primary care does not pay as well – and the average student loan debt for med school graduates is $161,290. Only about 24 percent of MD graduates lean to primary care. That’s not the case with recent osteopathic medicine graduates, though. &nbsp;</span></p><p></p><p> Fri, 15 Mar 2013 23:02:34 +0000 Harum Helmy 30507 at http://kbia.org Is high-speed internet access the key to small towns' survival? http://kbia.org/post/high-speed-internet-access-key-small-towns-survival <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Is high-speed Internet the way to attract more people to live in rural Missouri? One MU professor seems to think so. First – let’s dial back a little bit. In a story that </span>KBIA<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> aired on Feb. 13, our reporter Lukas </span>Udstuen<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> investigated </span><a href="http://www.kbia.org/post/rural-mo-town-now-ghost-past-settlement" style="line-height: 1.5;">the story of Goss</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, a rural town in Monroe County, Missouri. Its population? Zero.</span></p><p> Wed, 20 Feb 2013 22:13:12 +0000 Harum Helmy 29198 at http://kbia.org Is high-speed internet access the key to small towns' survival? The cost of connecting doctors with rural patients electronically http://kbia.org/post/cost-connecting-doctors-rural-patients-electronically <p></p><p>A shortage of rural health care professionals throughout the state has health systems connecting with patients in remote areas through telehealth.</p><p>At the University Hospital in Columbia, telehealth coordinator Samuel Woodard thumbs a remote which sends a camera at the far end of the room spinning around to face him. His co-workers at the Missouri Telehealth Network offices across town appear on the screen.</p><p>“Hey Katie, how’s it going? We’re just going over the equipment, showing him how the telehealth unit works.” Woodard says.</p> Wed, 31 Oct 2012 16:43:32 +0000 Lee Jian Chung 23737 at http://kbia.org The cost of connecting doctors with rural patients electronically Telehealth can connect rural areas with medical care http://kbia.org/post/telehealth-can-connect-rural-areas-medical-care <p>In September, the state awarded grants to eleven rural Missouri hospitals to improve broadband internet connections speeds. The connection would be used for telehealth, a way rural towns access physicians in bigger cities electronically. KBIA’s Lee Jian Chung brings us the first of a two part series on the expansion of telehealth services in Missouri. Tue, 23 Oct 2012 22:31:35 +0000 Lee Jian Chung 23308 at http://kbia.org Telehealth can connect rural areas with medical care