News

Columbia Public Schools

Columbia Public Schools has found its chief equity officer for the district.

Carla London will be the chief equity officer after serving as the district’s director of student services.

According to Columbia Public Schools, London has also served as the district’s supervisor for student and family advocacy. London also coordinated the Aspiring Scholars program for secondary schools from 2002 to  2006. Before working in the district, London was a middle school teacher in Texas.

Ryan Ferguson
Bridgit Bowden / KBIA

Ryan Ferguson and local officials have reportedly reached a tentative settlement on liability as part of a federal civil suit filed in 2014.

According to court documents, federal judge Nanette Laughrey was notified of the settlement during a telephone conference on May 19.

Ferguson filed the suit after his conviction of the 2001 murder of Columbia Tribune sports editor Kent Heitholt was thrown out.

Terms of the settlement, which does not cover damages, have not been disclosed.

Tailor Institute

A Cape Girardeau institute that helps autistic people will remain open despite losing its state funding.

Officials with the Tailor Institute say they were expecting state funding to arrive July 1, but instead were told the funding has been notified.

The institute works with autistic people to develop skills to become independent, particularly in the workplace.

The Southeast Missourian reports the institute operated on an annual $200,000 state grant.

Director Carrie Tracy says the institute's staff was not given an explanation for the funding cut.

Missouri School of Journalism

  When I told my long-suffering wife I intended to write about Wednesday’s announcement of our university’s new chancellor, she replied with some asperity that she could predict what I would say.

“You’re always optimistic about the new people,” she said, noting that I’ve sometimes had cause to regret those first impressions.

Well, here we go again.

How could I not be optimistic? President Mun Choi, about whom I remain optimistic, was close to giddy as he introduced Alexander Cartwright. The standing-room-only welcoming crowd in the Alumni Center was buoyant. The sun was shining.

In the press conference that followed the opening ceremony, Rudi Keller of the Columbia Daily Tribune seriously asked the question I had posed half-jokingly to Mike Alden earlier as we walked into the building: Why would Dr. Cartwright, or anybody, want the job?..

 

Read the complete column at the Missourian.

Today Paul Pepper and ANGELA SPECK, Professor, Director of Astronomy, MU, break down the science behind the upcoming total solar eclipse! If you have questions, odds are we have answers. In this interview, Angela takes us step by step from "first contact" at 11:45 a.m. through the "total phase" beginning at 1:12 p.m. | May 26, 2017

Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez USDA / Flickr

A preliminary assessment has found about $86 million of damage and costs from recent flooding and storms in Missouri.

The figures provided Thursday by the state Department of Public Safety include almost $58 million of public costs for damage to infrastructure, debris removal and emergency response efforts.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A Missouri Senate committee has advanced a proposal that would allow some companies that use a lot of electricity to negotiate lower rates.

The committee advanced a proposal Thursday after hearing a state Public Service Commission analysis that said average consumers wouldn't see significant rate increases under most scenarios.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

As the University of Missouri’s new chancellor steps into office later this year, he will do so with a larger base salary than his predecessor.

When former chancellor R. Bowen Loftin took office in 2013, he was offered a base salary of $450,000 a year before bonuses. Alexander Cartwright, who will be taking over the same position, signed a contract Wednesday to make about 8 percent more, $485,000 a year. In the same time period, the consumer price index, which measures cost of living, has only gone up about 3 percent.

LyceumTheatre.org

In two weeks, the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre kicks off its 57th season. The theatre's Artistic Director Quin Gresham previewed the upcoming season with Darren Hellwege. Also on the show, we look ahead to a Memorial Day event that finds famous, late Columbians being re-enacted at their gravesites.

The former interim president of the University of Missouri system will be the fill-in overseer of Lincoln University in Jefferson City.

Lincoln University's governing board announced Thursday that Mike Middleton will take on the new role as of next Thursday.

Middleton will be the interim president at Lincoln until a permanent successor to Kevin Rome is named. After four years at Lincoln, Rome announced in March that he will become president of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, as of July 1.

AP Images

On this two-part edition of Global Journalist, we look at political corruption in Malaysia and a controversial new film about migration to Europe.

In Malaysia, the country's politics have been in turmoil for two years amid a corruption scandal involving the prime minister and allegations of money laundering in a government investment fund known as 1MDB.

Joining the program to talk about why the allegations have received little coverage in the southeast Asian nation's media is Nicholas Cheng of the Malaysian newspaper The Star.

In a separate interview, the Dutch filmmaker Guido Hendrikx speaks about his new film "Stranger in Paradise," a hard-edged look at how migrants are received in Europe. The film has shown at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam and the 2017 True/False Film Festival in Missouri.


Today Paul Pepper and MEL ZELENAK talk about the best ways to enjoy a cruise vacation. From selecting the right ship to booking to packing to onboard gambling, Mel's got easy tips and tricks for even the most novice of travelers. May 25, 2017

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The Missouri House has given final approval to a proposal that supporters say would bring hundreds of jobs to the southeastern corner of the state.

The proposal passed Wednesday with a 120-17 vote.

The original bill would've allowed steel-works facilities and aluminum smelters to negotiate lower utilities rates than what is allowed under current law. Lawmakers later expanded the proposal to allow any new facility using more than 50 megawatts of electricity a month to negotiate lower rates.

Columbia police officers took a 15-year old male into custody Tuesday after receiving reports of the student threatening violence at a Columbia Public School.

According to a release from the Columbia Police Department, a rumor about a possible school shooting on the final day of classes was reported to a school resource officer for Muriel Battle High School.

American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri

The ACLU of Missouri filed a federal lawsuit against the Rolla Public Library on Tuesday. 

According to the ACLU, Randy Johnson attempted to reserve a room at the Rolla Public Library in January. He was planning to teach volunteers how to collect signatures in support of a ballot proposition to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

The lawsuit states that when the library’s director found out the purpose of the meeting, Johnson was denied use of a room.

Fox News announced it is retracting its story on Seth Rich. The DNC staffer was murdered in Washington D.C. last summer. The cable network has been reporting for more than a week that his slaying came 12 days after contacting Wikileaks. Now, it says that reporting doesn’t stand up to its editorial standards. What changed? Also, remembering Roger Ailes and the complicated legacy he leaves behind, Anderson Cooper’s snarky streak continues, and the guidance Facebook gives employees for removing hate speech, sexually explicit or violent content from the site. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

President Trump made campaign promises to pull the U.S. out of big international trade deals and focus instead on one-on-one agreements with other countries. But that has farmers worried they will lose some of the $135 billion in goods they sold overseas last year.

Two years ago, Missouri rancher Mike John expected the U.S. beef industry to grow by providing steaks and hamburgers from the Midwest to hungry eaters in Japan. He was planning on the Trans Pacific Partnership, or TPP, a massive trade deal among 12 countries, including the U.S. and Japan. It took eight years of negotiations to get each nation involved to agree to lower tariffs. Some economists expected the pact to add $3 billion dollars to the U.S. agriculture industry. Trump, however, called the TPP a disaster and pulled the U.S. out.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

Alexander Cartwright, provost and executive vice chancellor at the State University of New York, was announced Wednesday as the University of Missouri's new chancellor. 

Cartwright, who holds Bachelor's and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering, says he's excited to begin.

"The opportunity to become chancellor of one of the nation's top public state universities is the chance of a lifetime," he said in a statement. "I am honored and humbled by the faith in me exhibited by the search committee."

Cartwright will officially start work Aug. 1. 

Missouri Department of Conservation

Do you like to camp? Are campfires a part of your plan? The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reminds you to be safe and have fun this spring and summer, but please don’t move firewood. Otherwise, you may be inadvertently spreading an insect invader that’s wreaking havoc across the United States. In this week’s installment of Discover Nature, we recognize Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week.

Today Paul Pepper visits with MICHAEL PORTER about the many different classes being offered during the Osher@Mizzou summer session. If you're 50+ and want to learn more about George Caleb Bingham or William Blake's poetry or the American presidents (just to name a few), you're in luck. Register today! At [3:34] DAN WRIGHT and JONATHAN TALLMAGE invite everyone to come see "Pump Boys and Dinettes" at Maplewood Barn Theatre in Columbia! This popular show opens tomorrow night and runs for three weekends. Jonathan performs an abbreviated version of "Mamaw" at [5:17]. May 24, 2017

Nathan Lawrence

Tuition at the University of Missouri is going up this fall.

In its monthly meeting today, the UM System Board of Curators voted to raise tuition and fees on all four system campuses. These changes will take effect at the beginning of the 2018 fiscal year, which starts July 1.

Undergraduate tuition on all four campuses will be going up by about 2 percent. Nonresident graduate students at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla will feel the greatest increase. Their tuition will go up 6 percent.

umkc.edu

University of Missouri-Kansas City Chancellor Leo Morton plans to retire at the end of the next academic year.

Morton announced his decision Tuesday in an email to faculty. He has been chancellor since 2008, after being an administrator at Aquila Inc.

KCUR-FM reports that Morton says he hopes to spend his final year at the school completing projects like the Downtown Arts Campus, Career Development Institute and fundraising for a new engineering lab facility. He called the chancellor's job one of the greatest privileges and blessings of his life.

Lincoln University
Kristina D.C. Hoeppner

 

Lincoln University in Jefferson City plans to cut 48 jobs and reduce salaries as it tries to respond to a budget deficit.

The school, which is facing a $3.8 million deficit in its fiscal 2018 budget, announced Monday that 32.5 staff and 15.5 faculty positions will be cut.

KRCG reports a statement from the school said the jobs services it provides to students will continue knowing that the workforce is already stretched too thin.

Doug Kerr / Flickr

A court ruling requires Missouri to at least temporarily remove GPS monitoring devices from some sex offenders.

The injunction was filed Monday in Cole County in a lawsuit filed against the state on behalf of a sex offender from St. Charles County.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Department of Corrections Board of Probation and Parole installed 364 GPS ankle monitors on sex offenders in April because of new security requirements. Lifetime monitoring was not part of the offenders' sentencing agreements.

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