News

  The University of Missouri System's new president says he wants to leverage private-public partnerships to bring revenue and investments to campus.

The Columbia Missourian reports President Mun Choi joined about 100 members and guests of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday as part of its "Lunch with a Leader" series. At the gathering, Choi emphasized the mutual economic benefit of such partnerships.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

The MU School of Music revealed the architectural design for a new building on Tuesday. Construction at Hitt Street and University Avenue is set to begin in January 2018. It will open in August 2019 according to the project timeline.

The school currently has six buildings spread throughout campus. One of the main reasons why the school needs a new building is the need to consolidate all daily operations. Julia Gaines, the director of the school, said it is critical for students to be around each other so that they can collaborate musically.

MKT trail
Missouri Department of Tourism / flickr

  The Columbia City Council approved the MKT Trail bridge replacement project in a public hearing Monday.

The Columbia Parks and Recreation Department proposed the replacement of bridges No. 5 and No. 7 on the MKT Trail. If funding allows, the department will include replacement of bridge No. 8. The new bridges will not require as much maintenance and inspection compared to the existing ones that are 120-years-old.

Flickr

Daniel Boone Regional Library is offering a few sessions of free tax preparation services each week. The program is organized by a group of volunteers from AARP. The library site is one of more than 5,000 service locations nationwide, according to AARP’s website.

AAPR Site Coordinator Michael Cox said they help people file tax returns electronically.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

A new non-profit group will enlist volunteer lawyers from private law firms to take on some of the Missouri State Public Defender System’s heavy caseload.


GEORGE KENNEDY: Dark Money Flows in Jefferson City

6 hours ago
Missouri School of Journalism

I didn’t vote for Eric Greitens, but once he was elected our governor, I thought and wrote that there was considerable ground for hope. 

Now I’m afraid there’s even more cause for worry. And I’m not talking about his assaults on the university, on our public schools and on a woman’s right to choose.

Gov. Greitens brought to the job an impressive resume (doctorate from Oxford, distinguished military career, foundation to help veterans), a picture-perfect family (wife a scholar, kids adorable) and political potential (Internet domain “EricGreitensforPresident.com” reserved by him eight years ago).

His inaugural speech was eloquent and broadly appealing. His first appointments included our first female head of the Highway Patrol and another woman from out of state to clean up the Department of Corrections. His budget withholdings seemed necessary if painful.

But it appears that Gov. Greitens has somehow overlooked — or worse yet, chosen to ignore — the obligation of every elected official to be accountable to the people who are governed...

Read the complete Column at the Missourian.


President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas? Also, why Secretary of State Rex Tillerson eschews a press pool, remembering legendary columnist Jimmy Breslin and the end of the Missing Richard Simmons podcast. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Blink while driving on Highway 34 east of Greeley, Colorado, and you might miss the former Great Plains town of Dearfield.

Abandoned towns from the early 20th century are far from unique on this stretch of plains. Withered storefronts and collapsed false-front homes are common. Boom and bust economics and harsh weather made it tough for turn of the century settlers to succeed long-term.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week, on Discover Nature, take a walk outside, and you may hear one of the first serenades signifying spring on the horizon.


Today Paul Pepper and JACK SCHULTZ, Director of the Bond Life Sciences Center at the University of Missouri, talk about the weather. We can all pretty much agree that it was a fairly mild winter, but why? Basically, a weakened jet stream - thanks to warming temperatures at the North Pole - has changed the dynamics between the top of the globe and everything around it. Jack says that farmers agree, adding, "they don't care about the politics, but they do care about when they plant and when they don't." March 22, 2017

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

Private attorneys in the St. Louis area have committed to take over some cases from the state's overburdened public defender system on a volunteer basis.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that a new nonprofit group, called the Missouri Coalition for the Right to Counsel, is behind the plan. It calls for younger private sector attorneys to handle certain jury cases for indigent defendants in the circuit courts of St. Louis and St. Louis County. Besides reducing public defender caseloads, the young attorneys can gain trial experience.

The Columbia Board of Education and Columbia Public School administrators are looking to close the achievement gap.

A 2016 performance report identifies a seven percent decrease in performance from 2015 for subgroups such as CPS students of color, low income students and special education students who have a significantly lower performance than their white counterparts.

Closing the achievement gap has been on the agenda for CPS for several years, but they have been struggling with how to effectively handle the situation and are now planning to take action.

City Council Approves United Airlines Deal

13 hours ago
columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia City Council voted Monday to approve a one-year incentive package with United Airlines. The deal includes a $600,000 revenue guarantee for the airline’s first year in Columbia and confirms round-trip Denver flights beginning in August.

“Denver is one of the top five mega-hubs in the United States, that provides some of the best connectivity for international and domestic destinations,” said Columbia Community Relations Director Steven Sapp. “We know that Denver has been one of the most sought-after destinations from Columbia and Boone County [residents].”

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Unemployment in Missouri has dropped again.

Data released Tuesday by the Missouri Department of Economic Development show the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate edged down to 4.1 percent in February compared to 4.2 percent in January.

The unemployment rate has fallen slightly in Missouri each of the past six months.

The state also gained more than 6,700 jobs from January to February. Some of the largest gains were in the leisure and hospitality field and the accommodation and food services industry.

Mizzou Says Goodbye to Another Residential Hall

Mar 21, 2017

The University of Missouri is demolishing one of its longest standing residence halls.  The demolition of Laws Hall began on Monday and is anticipated to take five weeks to complete.

The demolition is a part of the final phase of the Residential Life Master Plan.  RLMP began in 2001 when the University of Missouri Board of Curators approved a four-phase plan after a projection of increased enrollment.  After phase IV began, Residential Life added an additional phase.

COLUMBIA -- Cuts to University of Missouri programs are on the way as the school faces budget cuts from the state, according to a presentation Tuesday from system president Mun Choi.

Choi highlighted a number of ways the UM system plans to handle budget cuts in a speech to Columbia Chamber of Commerce members on the University of Missouri – Columbia campus.

Chief among those was streamlining university programs. Choi says he and campus officials will gauge how important programs are to student graduation rates and the university’s profile.

Kirk Kittell / flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A renewable energy company is again facing opposition as it seeks one of the final pieces of regulatory approval needed to carry wind power from the nation's heartland to the east.

Missouri utility regulators began hearing testimony Monday on a request from Clean Line Energy to build a high-voltage transmission line from western Kansas across Missouri and Illinois to an Indiana power grid that connects with eastern states.

Dr.Farouk / Flickr

This week on Intersection, we talk with KBIA health reporter Bram Sable-Smith about possible changes to healthcare in Missouri. One change could come this Thursday, when the U.S. House is scheduled to vote on the American Health Care Act. This bill is the GOP’s proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. We discuss what the changes proposed in the GOP replacement bill could mean for Missouri, especially for people in rural parts of our state. 

Listen to the full episode here: 


via Flickr user Hey Paul Studios

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas?

Sopan Deb, New York Times: “Trump proposes eliminating the arts and humanities endowments

A new report shows that withheld funding and lack of follow-through effectively killed a program aimed at allowing Missouri residents receiving child support to accept wage hikes without losing state assistance.

gun
Drab Mayko / FLICKR

The Daniel Boone Regional Library Board of Trustees approved changes allowing patrons to bring firearms onto the library’s locations last Thursday. The library’s website explained that the regulations would be different between locations. 

Today Paul Pepper visits with SHELIA ROBERTSON, Coordinator of Pediatric Injury Prevention at MU Children's Hospital, about poison prevention in children. For instance, Shelia tells us that easy access to your grandparents' medication is one of the most-often received phone calls to Poison Control centers. Want more home prevention tips? Come to Safe Kids Day 2017 April 29th in Columbia! (And watch the segment, of course.) At [5:47] meet University of Missouri graduate student, and one of two featured speakers at tomorrow night's monthly Science on Tap CoMo event, JACQUELINE GAMBOA VARELA. Jacqueline gives us a sneak preview of her presentation on DNA damage and magnets! March 21, 2017

After a lengthy process, Columbia City Council unanimously passed the Unified Development CodeMonday night. The Code sets the standards for zoning and development in the city. The council hopes it will ensure the city’s growth remains in check.

The council passed the regulations after several meetings and public hearings. Council members had listened to public comment from various Columbia residents.

Cuonzo Martin: "It just feels like home"

Mar 21, 2017
Jack Hummel

The University of Missouri Athletics welcomed Cuonzo Martin as the new Men’s Basketball head coach Monday afternoon. MU Students, faculty, and fans gathered to welcome Martin at Mizzou Arena with a “campus celebration.”  The introduction was open to the public as MU Athletic Director Jim Sterk introduced Martin to Tiger fans.

401K 2013 / Flickr

The Trump administration reversed previous guidance on the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) last Thursday.

The Obama administration put forth the guidance and stopped guarantor agencies from charging high fees on loan payments for students.

Students had to enter into a rehabilitation payment program within two months of defaulting on their loan to not be charged fees. According to the U.S. Department of Education, more than four million people who have FFELP loans are currently in default.

CCUA Puts on “Empty Bowls” Event to Fight Hunger

Mar 20, 2017

"Empty Bowls" is a national event, and this week, Columbia locals were able to get a taste of the event themselves.

The Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture hosted “Empty Bowls” on Sunday at the Missouri United Methodist Church to raise awareness of hunger in the community. All of the donations raised will go toward the Planting for the Pantry program. A meal of soup and bread was provided for attendees, as well as a table full of free items to pick up such as postcards and a “Planting for the Pantry Pledge Card.”

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back local author and poet WALTER BARGEN! Walter reads two warm weather-themed poems: 'Sea Fever' by John Masefield at [1:16]; and his own, 'Point Dume Screen Test', at [3:50]. March 20, 2017

Pages