News

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

  A Justice Department report summary has found across-the-board flaws in police's response last summer to the protests in Ferguson, including antagonizing crowds and violating free-speech rights.

The Associated Press obtained the summary, which cites "vague and arbitrary" orders to keep protesters moving that violated their rights of assembly and free speech.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon signed Senate Bill 174 on Monday, creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) program. The program allows Missourians with disabilities acquired before the age of 26 to open a tax-exempt savings account to use toward expenses related to the disability.

The program also allows people with a disability, family members or donors to make a tax-deductible contribution up to $8,000 to an ABLE account per year.

Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

The Missouri Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that state’s so-called Right To Farm amendment remains constitutional.

The Right to Farm amendment is meant to protect Missouri farmers from new laws that would change current farm practices. It was added to the state Constitution in August 2014 by a slim margin of votes.

Critics, including many small farmers and animal rights groups, say the ballot language was misleading to voters and opens the door for foreign corporations to exploit Missouri farmland. 

via Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions on marriage equality, the death penalty, health care subsidies, and more.

Today Paul Pepper visits with ASHLEY GUILLEMETTE, Director of MU Family Impact Center, about what's behind this brand new 'community outreach center' in Columbia. The list of services (including home education, behavioral health clinic, family building) goes on and on, and it's all FREE! Watch for details. June 30, 2015

Scott Harvey / KSMU

A new Missouri measure aims to help families financially support those with disabilities.

Columbia Horse Police
KBIA

The Columbia Police Department has disbanded its mounted and motorcycle units due to staff shortages. All but one motorcycle officer has been switched over to standard car patrol.

Datchler / Flickr

Two Mid-Missouri counties are prepared to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples in light of the Supreme Court’s decision last Friday to make same-sex marriage legal throughout the United States.

Although Boone County began issuing licenses that same day, some counties have yet to receive any applications. 

Thinking Out Loud: Local Youth Make Waves

Jun 29, 2015
Kelsey Kupferer

Radio can be a powerful medium for storytelling. Just ask a group of recent graduates from Columbia's Rock Bridge High School. In this episode of Thinking Out Loud, we hear a trio of young women's stories that explore how their identity was formed and who they want to be.


Today Paul Pepper and MARIE ROBERTSON, Director and Co-Owner of Dancearts of Columbia, talk about the upcoming 2015 Dance Intensive Camp, happening July 13th-24th. Sign up today! At [3:19] NANETTE WARD, Central Missouri Stop Human Trafficking, is here with news about recent legislation that passed concerning trafficking in the U.S. June 29, 2015

Health money
Tax Credits / Flickr

Missouri is set to become the first state to spell out the type of eating disorder treatments that insurance companies must cover.

Photo provided by Miller County Emergency Management.

 

Up to 100 residents were evacuated from a mobile home park in northeast Missouri because of rising flood waters.

Rosemary / Flickr

Mercy Jefferson Hospital is set to break ground in Crystal City on a $135 million project that will focus on adding a new three-story patient tower to the 251-bed facility.

Invasive Insect Threatens Missouri Ash Trees

Jun 29, 2015
USDAgov / Flickr

The Missouri Department of Conservation has found an invasive tree pest in 11 Missouri counties.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Today, with the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, the United States Supreme Court decided same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states. This morning, the Boone County Recorder of Deeds Office began to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.


tim wolfe
Janet Saidi / KBIA

President of University of Missouri System Tim Wolfe spoke to the Board of Curators today about the future of University of Missouri campuses.

He talked about three main goals that will not only brighten the future of UM System schools, but also give them a single unifying vision.

One topic Wolfe discussed was the way the campuses handled Title IX, which aims to help with sex-based discrimination and campus safety. He says that the UM System’s forward thinking and diligence in regards to this statute has placed it as a leader among Universities.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed a bill aimed at revamping the state's student transfer system.

Nixon on Friday criticized expanded options for virtual schools and said the bill didn't address key issues with current law.

Failing schools now must pay tuition if students decide to transfer elsewhere. Districts say that's caused financial hardship as they work to regain accreditation.

Nixon also cited the lack of a tuition cap in his veto. He said without that, schools that are struggling the most would continue to lose resources.

Mitch Bennett / flickr

The effort to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour in St. Louis is in jeopardy after the chairman of the committee that would consider the idea canceled all future hearings on it.

A measure filed this month with support of Mayor Francis Slay would have potentially raised the wage in the city to $15 by 2020.

But the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Alderman Joe Vaccaro, acting chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, canceled all hearings, calling it disingenuous to push the bill on such short notice.

Today Paul Pepper visits with Missouri's first poet laureate, Walter Bargen, about "Trouble Behind Glass Doors," first published in 2013. Listen to Walter read two poems, "Dyslexic Forrest" and "University of Fields," the latter of which was written for former MU Chancellor Brady Deaton. June 26, 2015

Scott Harvey / KSMU

  Multiple Missouri lawmakers say Democratic Governor Jay Nixon will veto a bill aimed at revamping the state's student transfer law.

Water Boil Advisory Accompanies Pipe Replacement

Jun 26, 2015
water faucet
Jenn Durfey / flickr

Columbia Water and Light is replacing a water main in Columbia. The pipe will run from Texas Avenue to Creasy Springs Road.

Bikas Das / AP

Journalists and bloggers in Bangladesh are finding themselves increasingly under fire. Last year, a group that calls itself “Defenders of Islam” published a “hit list” of more than 80 writers.

Then in the first six months of 2015, three of those named were hacked to death in separate knife attacks. The latest was in May, when four masked men attacked blogger Ananta Bijoy Das with machetes while he was heading to work.

Accessible Golf Course Under Construction

Jun 25, 2015
Meg Hilling/KBIA

  Construction on a handicap-accessible golf course is underway this week at the Turkey Creek Golf Center in Jefferson City.

The 9-hole, Par-3 course will be made of field turf, have eight-foot wide cart paths, and access ramps for players to utilize. Organizers of the course say it will be one of the first, if not the first, of its kind in the United States.


Ted Eytan / flickr

The Affordable Care Act won another major legal victory today. In a 6 to 3 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against a challenge to the law that would have eliminated subsidies in 34 states, including Missouri, for those buying health insurance through the federal marketplace.


Under the Microscope: Missouri Heatwave

Jun 25, 2015
Ray Tsang / Flickr

  A common joke about weather in the Midwest is that if you don’t like it, all you have to do is wait 10 minutes, and it is sure to fluctuate. Missouri found this out in a rather heavy-handed way earlier this week, as the first days of seasonal summer brought a heat wave that pushed temperatures up into the mid-nineties, and heat indexes well beyond 100 degrees Fahrenheit. And while the heat can be a blessing or a nuisance depending on personal taste, it can also be a detrimental health risk.


Pages