News

PM Newscast for September, 10

Sep 10, 2014

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Northern Missouri is facing low-level flooding and minor damage after tornadoes, high winds and rain storms visited the area.
  • Protesters in Ferguson are planning to block Interstate 70 as part of an act of civil disobedience.
  • A Missouri inmate has been put to death for killing two people during a 1998 restaurant robbery.
  • Abortion opponents are praying for success at the Missouri capitol as lawmakers consider overriding vetoes.

Missouri Storms

Sep 10, 2014
Thomas Bresson

A heavy rain storm left much of northern Missouri facing low-level flooding and cleaning up mostly minor damage caused by tornadoes and high winds.

The National Weather Service says 10 inches of rain was reported in Sullivan County near Browning early Wednesday, with 9 inches in Kirksville. Rainfall reports between 5 and 8 inches were common across northern Missouri, with many streets closed due to flooding.

A short section of Interstate 29 near Mound City was closed early Wednesday while stranded cars were removed.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Since 2000, Columbian Eduardo Crespi has run a community center called El Centro Latino. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with Crespi. KBIA's Trevor Harris also met some Columbia residents who were at the center on a recent Monday.


The Baltimore Ravens cut Ray Rice after TMZ releases graphic video of him assaulting his now-wife in a hotel elevator, six months after the incident. How did media pressure play into the decision? NBC re-launches “Meet the Press” with Chuck Todd at the helm, Bloomberg News fails to cover the return of it’s CEO, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and why another new reporting fellowship the Huffington Post has some journalism purists raising an eyebrow. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

MU Archives

Peace Park is that grassy little knoll along the north edge of MU’s campus. It’s at the corner of 8th and Elm, a stone’s throw away from the columns. There’s a creek (or drainage ditch) that saunters through it, creating a calm and tranquil vibe for the meditators and hammock dwellers.    

    

Jonny Williams / Flickr

Of the numerous items Missouri legislators will consider during this veto session, Senate Bill 841 has state health advocates paying attention. The bill's main purpose was to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. But these good intentions may have led lawmakers astray.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • The Ferguson City Council meets for the first time since the Michael Brown shooting.
  • Missouri has executed Earl Ringo Jr., the eighth execution this year.
  • The MU Children's Hospital has began screening patients for Enterovirus 68.
Women and Children's hospital
File Photo / KBIA

The University of Missouri Children's Hospital has performed screening tests on children who they suspect may have Enterovirus 68.

As preparations for a man’s execution begin, his pen pal is hoping she will be able to speak with him for the last time tonight.

Keith Allison / Flickr

More than six months ago, Ray Rice was caught on surveillance video beating his then-fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City hotel elevator.   In July, the National Football League disciplined Rice for the incident, suspending him from the first two regular season games.

Throughout the summer, the league came under heavy criticism in the press.  Activists, reporters and columnists came down hard on the NFL for having stiffer penalties for players charged with illegal drug use. 

The legislature reconvenes this week to attempt to override several of Gov. Jay Nixon vetoes of bills they passed last spring.  Chris Kelly sat down to talk with us about what he thinks the legislature should and will do in this edition of Talking Politics.

PM Newscast for September 9, 2014

Sep 9, 2014
David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Legislative budget leaders plan to try to override about 50 line-item budget vetoes, despite new doubts from the attorney general about their authority to do so.

Missouri Department of Corrections

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri is preparing to execute a man convicted of killing two people while robbing a Columbia restaurant in 1998.

Earl Ringo Jr. is scheduled to die at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday at the state prison in Bonne Terre. Ringo would be the eighth person put to death in Missouri this year and the 10th since November.

gun
~Steve Z~ / flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Republicans are clashing again with Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon on gun legislation.

A vote scheduled for Wednesday could overturn his veto of a bill allowing specially trained teachers to carry guns in school and other residents to openly carry firearms in cities.

Missouri home care attendants demand higher wages

Sep 9, 2014
Rosemary / Flickr

The Missouri Home Care Union has quite the battle ahead of it. Union members are requesting wages for home care attendants be raised to $11 an hour.  Attendants are responsible for assisting elderly individuals and people with physical disabilities.

Paul Pepper: The Boone County Hams (Performance)

Sep 9, 2014

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back local barbershop quartet, The Boone County Hams! They perform "Chordbuster March" and "It Is Well." September 9, 2014

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • State auditor Tom Schweich claims Gov. Nixon violated the state constitution when he withheld money from recent state budgets.
  • Columbia residents are meeting to discuss community violence.
  • The Columbia Board of Education approved plans to build the new Southwest Elementary School
Bob McDavid
KBIA

The mayor’s Crime Task Force for Community Violence is reaching out to Columbia residents to discuss solutions for stopping community violence.

Southwest Elementary is Ready for Construction

Sep 9, 2014
Derek Brizendine / KBIA

The Columbia Board of Education approved plans to build a new elementary school set to open in Fall 2016. 

Caitlin Regan / Flickr

  Construction of Columbia’s newest elementary school is set to begin next month at Scott Boulevard and Route KK.

File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri lawmakers are poised to vote this week to enact one of the nation's longest abortion waiting periods.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich is accusing Gov. Jay Nixon of violating the state constitution by making budget cuts in 2012.

Hey Paul Studios via Flickr

The nurse who was walking across part of Missouri announced this morning that she will not be continuing her walk.

Sherry Payne posted on her organization’s Facebook page that the RV she was using in her trek from Clinton to Augusta was hit in Jefferson City on Sunday night. While the driver of the other car is still unknown, Jefferson City Police Department confirmed that there were no injuries in the crash.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Details on the upcoming veto session.
  • A nurse is walking across Missouri to raise awareness about the infant mortality rate.
  • The St. Louis police chief has renewed his calls for tougher gun crime penalties.
Elvert Barnes / Flickr

The St. Louis police chief has promised a vigorous investigation after six apparently unrelated homicides in an 18-hour period and renewed his call for tougher gun crime penalties.

ROLLING STONE HAS A MASSIVE PROFILE OF WILLIE NELSON THIS WEEK. It goes in depth — they call it their “definitive profile” of the music and cultural legend — about his life, career, and, of course, marijuana.

A group of minority journalists are fighting to bring more diversity to American newsrooms, journalism conferences, panels and classrooms. The Journalism Diversity Project is designed to make it easy for hiring managers and event organizers to find qualified experts who are journalists of color. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss. 

Carl Mydans / Library of Congress

The Great Depression saw the U.S. arguably near rock bottom. Some of the economically hardest hit citizens were farmers and their families. Beginning in 1935, photographers hit the dusty back roads of the country. They were charged with documenting the effect of the depression on rural communities.

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