News

Sara Shahriari / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers have voted to give state colleges and universities more leeway to raise tuition.

The bill passed the Senate 24-8 and the House 109-31 on Friday. It would allow public universities to raise tuition by as much as 5 percent on top of hikes to keep up with inflation.

The additional 5 percent increase, however, would only be allowed if state funding had been cut the year before. Increases could also not be larger than the amount of the previous year's cut.

Currently, state colleges can only use inflation rates to increase tuition.

Missouri Lawmakers have voted to help new mothers struggling with addiction pay for treatment programs.

The bill, approved by the House Friday in a 133-6 vote, would allow women to receive Medicaid coverage for more than a year after giving birth to pay for substance abuse and mental health programs.

Currently, Medicaid coverage ends about two months after a woman gives birth.

The Republican-led Missouri Legislature has passed a bill to cut the corporate income tax rate from 6.25 percent to 4 percent.

House lawmakers gave the bill final approval in a 96-42 vote Friday, just hours before the 6 p.m. deadline to pass bills.

The 2.25 percent tax cut for businesses would take effect in January 2020 if made law. This revenue loss would be offset in the proposal by changing how multistate corporations can calculate their taxable income.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri prosecutor said Friday that he won't be filing any charges against Gov. Eric Greitens for the way his campaign reported the receipt of a charity donor list used for political fundraising.

The decision by Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson marked a victory for Greitens on the same day that the Republican-controlled Missouri Legislature was to open a monthlong special session to decide whether to try to impeach the Republican governor for various allegations of misconduct.

Commentary: Permanent Interests

May 18, 2018

At Columbia College I teach and study American domestic politics.  I know only enough about foreign policy and international relations to be dangerous.  That said I willingly acknowledge that foreign and domestic policy are inseparably intertwined.  President Trump is betting that foreign policy successes will benefit him politically at home.  More about this in a minute.

MELANIE DIXON says the Ronald McDonald House Charities should be the "charity of choice" because you never know when you might need it. As you might guess, Melanie speaks from personal experience. Hear her story and find out how you can get involved! Plus, KRISTIN BOWEN and CATEY TERRY want you to #WearOrange in support of Gun Violence Awareness Day. A local celebration will be held at Douglass Park on June 1st. Watch for details! (5:00) May 18, 2018

Afternoon Newscast for May 17, 2018

May 17, 2018

  Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: 

The Missouri Legislature has passed a measure that could allow the biggest electric companies in the state to recover more of their costs for infrastructure improvements from customers.

Missouri senators have passed a bill to require public unions to hold recertification elections every three years and get permission annually to withdraw dues from employees' paychecks.

Under the legislation passed 21-11 Wednesday, public labor unions would need more than 50 percent of workers to vote in their favor in order to be recertified.

via Wikimedia Commons (Ranjith66)

Climate change is already having big effects on southern Asia.

Deadly heat waves like one that killed 3,500 people in India and Pakistan in 2015 are becoming more frequent. The summer monsoon rains are changing, affecting farmers.  Rising sea levels are expected to flood low-lying settlements and higher ocean temperatures harm sea life.

The climate is already spurring other changes. Thailand and the Philippines have closed beaches as warming waters threaten coral. In other parts of the region, people are moving out of places where drought and natural disasters have made farming increasingly risky. Some argue that the changing climate is even fueling militancy. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how climate change is shaping life in one of the world's most vulnerable regions.


Over 100 years ago, people weren't taught communication or leadership skills. Enter Toastmasters! Guests EVELYN PEARMAN and TOM TRABUE say it's more than just about public speaking, it's about personal development and gaining confidence in yourself. May 17, 2018

Missouri Legislators Tentatively Agree to Raise Tuition Caps

May 17, 2018
cindyt7070 / flickr

Lawmakers from the Missouri Senate and House hashed out an agreement Tuesday to raise caps on tuition increases.

A bill requiring lessons on consent and sexual assault passed the legislature Tuesday night after it was added as an amendment to a larger education bill.

The original House bill, written by students and sponsored by Rep. Holly Rehder, R-Sikeston,  never got a vote in the House chamber. 

The legislation was then added by Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, to House Bill 1606 during Senate debate, where it was adopted.

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week in Missouri’s woods, a native, thorny, locust tree displays clusters of fragrant white flowers.

 

The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) grows in dry or rocky upland woods, along streams, and in pastures, and thickets. 

 

A pioneer tree species, black locust easily invades disturbed sites, and some consider it a nuisance species. 

 

A surprise twist in the Greitens invasion of privacy case earlier this week -- did anyone see it coming? Many in the White House are trying to stop all the leaks, and not the plumbing kind. Plus, print reporters cashing in on television appearances, new sports gambling laws and we ask the question: who won't be covering this weekend's Royal wedding festivities? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

University of Missouri Chancellor Alexander Cartwright today announced reorganization efforts for several graduate programs across the university, including the complete elimination of at least four degree programs.

The Southside Philharmonic Orchestra will present an evening of "modernist works" from composers such as Debussy, Copeland, Stravinsky, and even a piece by our guest (and SPO conductor), PATRICK CLARK, this Friday in Jefferson City! Plus, don't miss the "best performers in the world" at this year's Scott Joplin Ragtime Festival May 30 - June 2 in Sedalia. Guest: BOB WALTERS. (4:23) May 16, 2018

Missouri Legislature Votes to Expand Sex Assault Education

May 16, 2018

The Missouri Legislature has passed a bill requiring school districts that teach sex education to include information about sexual violence, sexual harassment and consent.

The bill, approved by the House in a 127-19 vote Tuesday, would also provide subsidies for people taking a high school equivalency test for the first time, require that school districts notify parents if their child's data was breached and would place an active teacher on the state education board.

It would also expand some students' access to braille education.

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway's office is seeking information about the use of taxpayer funds to hire private attorneys for Gov. Eric Greitens' office.

Attorneys Ross Garber and Eddie Greim say they've been hired to represent the governor's office in potential House impeachment proceedings against Greitens.

Galloway released a letter Tuesday that she had sent to Greitens' office seeking copies of bids and contracts for the attorneys, itemized billings and the budget line item from which they are being paid.

Missouri Senate Passes Slimmed Tax Bill

May 16, 2018

Missouri senators on Tuesday passed a stripped-down tax bill that would cut the individual income tax rate from 5.9 percent to 5.5 percent starting next year, moving the Republican-helmed Legislature a step closer to passing tax changes before legislative session ends Friday.

Under the Senate version, individuals' income tax rate would gradually drop to 5.1 percent if the state meets revenue targets. To offset the loss in revenue, senators proposed reducing a federal income tax deduction. The proposal passed the Senate 24-9.

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway's office is seeking information about the use of taxpayer funds to hire private attorneys for Gov. Eric Greitens' office.

Attorneys Ross Garber and Eddie Greim say they've been hired to represent the governor's office in potential House impeachment proceedings against Greitens.

Garber says he's charging $320 an hour, which is half his normal rate. Greim says he and colleague Dane Martin are charging $340 an hour.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis police have launched an investigation into the way the city prosecutor's office handled the felony invasion-of-privacy case against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Police say the decision to investigate was made after meeting with two of Greitens' attorneys, who announced earlier Tuesday they would ask for an investigation. The defense attorneys allege that William Tisaby, an investigator hired by Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner, lied to the court and withheld evidence.

The Greitens surprise

Missouri Governor Eric Greitens received a brief reprieve when the St. Louis Circuit Attorney dropped invasion of privacy charges against him while the jury was being selected.  But the legislature's move toward impeachment and possible charges related to the Governor's alleged use of a charity mailing list for political fundraising still loom over him.

Find out who BILL CLARK and the Friends of Rocheport have deemed important enough to become the first inductees into the newly-created Rocheport Hall of Fame on May 20th! Also, what's in a name? JANE WHITESIDES and members of The Missouri Symphony have dropped the word 'society' from their title after almost 50 years. This, as they're gearing up for the start of the annual Hot Summer Nights series in early June! (5:31) May 15, 2018

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Sen. Bill Eigel, R-Weldon Spring, thought there was a consensus among his fellow lawmakers on a House tax bill when he brought it to the floor. However, differing opinions on the bill may have killed chances for this year.

The bill would reduce the income tax rate for the highest bracket by .4%, with the possibility of a reduction of .5%

Nearly 90 people have been arrested in Missouri's capital as part of a nonviolent protest against poverty, racism and other issues.

Several dozen demonstrators sat in a downtown Jefferson City street and refused to leave Monday as part of Poor People's Campaign protests across the country, including in neighboring Kansas.

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A Missouri senator is trying to stop Gov. Eric Greitens' State Board of Education appointees from withdrawing in an attempt to bar them from being reappointed later.

 

If gubernatorial appointees are withdrawn before Friday, they could potentially be appointed later to the same position. So Sen. Gary Romine in a procedural move Monday attempted to reject their withdrawal. 

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