News

St. Louis Arch
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Some charter schools in St. Louis are starting to worry that their increased popularity is making it difficult for them to stay accessible to low-income students.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports City Garden Montessori, Lafayette Preparatory Academy and The Biome are all working on creating income integration programs specifically for charter schools. The Missouri Charter Public School Association is helping draft a bill that would allow charter schools to set aside a percentage of enrollment spots specifically for low-income students.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Supporters of a right-to-work measure to ban mandatory union dues in Missouri are challenging ballot proposals that would undermine that policy.

The National Right to Work Foundation announced today it's helping three workers sue against ballot initiatives that would ask voters to amend the constitution to ensure union negotiating rights.

The lawsuits come as the Republican-led Legislature is moving quickly to send a right-to-work bill to Republican Gov. Eric Greitens. The new governor supports right to work.

U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Sweet potatoes are undergoing a modern renaissance in this country.

While they have always made special appearances on many American tables around the holidays, year-round demand for the root vegetables has grown. In 2015, farmers produced more sweet potatoes than in any year since World War II.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

According to some estimates, at least 3,000 people showed up in Columbia's Courthouse Plaza to march through downtown Columbia Saturday as a part of the national Women's March movement. Many marchers wore pink and carried signs calling for women’s rights, keeping the affordable care act, the recognition of climate change and the ousting of President Trump.

27-year-old Liz Simmons said she hopes people start to think about how they can implement change.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back ELIZABETH BRAATEN PALMIERI, Co-Founder and Artistic Director of Columbia's GreenHouse Theatre Project. Elizabeth joins us on the cusp of a three-show season six, which includes the "existential masterpiece," 'Waiting for Godot'. The theme this year is "Rebirth: an exploration of god, (womb)an and myth." At [3:44] NAT GRAHAM joins us along side one of the speakers from the first Science on Tap CoMo of 2017, JOSEPH COBETTO, a political science professor at the University of Missouri. Joseph will be leading a "scientific" presentation titled, 'What Happened on November 8th?' If the election results surprised you, show up this Wednesday at Craft Beer Cellar for some answers! January 23, 2017

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is making a school choice measure called education savings accounts a priority this legislative session.

The accounts, which transfer state dollars to parents through a bank account, can be used for educational costs including private school tuition, textbooks, online classes and therapy. Greitens' proposal is that parents of special needs students have access to the accounts.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

Missouri Women Struggle To Close Pay Gap

Flickr / nataliej

A report from the Women's Foundation and a University of Missouri researcher shows that women in Missouri continue to struggle to close the pay gap with men.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the foundation's 2015 Status of Women in Missouri was updated Thursday. The report found that women who work in the state full time earn 78 cents for every dollar that men who work in the state full time earn.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The new interim CEO of MU Health Care is Jonathan Curtright, its current Chief Operating Officer. Curtright, who holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Missouri, previously served as COO at Indiana University Health and University of Kentucky Healthcare.

Though the University of Missouri System has been the center of recent budget cuts and withholding, Curtright says he’s optimistic about the program’s fiscal outlook.

Rich Clarkson

Rich Clarkson is one of the founding fathers of modern sports photojournalism. Born in 1932, Clarkson's early photos of Wilt Chamberlain playing basketball at the University of Kansas in the 1950s were published in a new magazine called Sports Illustrated.

That launched a career that included photographing 60 NCAA men's basketball championships, nine Olympics and many, many other sports events.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Clarkson talks about how photojournalism has changed over the decades and the stories behind some of the most memorable sports photos of our time.

Today Paul Pepper and JACK SCHULTZ, Executive Director of the Bond Life Sciences Center, talk about genetic and contagious diseases and the basic research to finds their cures. Have you ever heard of penicillin? Sure you have; it was discovered by accident. How about a vaccine that will treat cancer cells, or a life-saving drug for Spinal Muscular Atrophy with origins at the University of Missouri? One could happen, the other already does. Jack explains it all - watch! January 20, 2017

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri Democrats are asking Gov. Eric Greitens to support their efforts to force the new leader of the state's consumer watchdog agency to resign.

House Democrats are pushing for the ouster of Dave Minnick, who was appointed last week by Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft to head of the secretary of state's securities division.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

The man who was the face of Ferguson, Missouri, in the turmoil that followed the 2014 fatal police shooting of Michael Brown has opposition in his re-election bid.

The St. Louis suburb announced Thursday that two candidates are running for mayor in the April 4 election — incumbent James Knowles III and councilwoman Ella Jones. The election is nonpartisan.

Knowles was elected to his first three-year term in 2011 and re-elected in April 2014. That August, white officer Darren Wilson fatally shot Brown, who was 18, black and unarmed.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  A bill prohibiting mandatory union fees in workplaces is moving to the Missouri Senate after winning House approval.

The 100-59 vote Thursday by the House comes after Republican supermajorities made the right-to-work law a priority for this year.

If the law passes, employees won't be required to pay union fees, even though the union may still be required to represent all employees.

Proponents say the laws give workers more freedom and will bring more jobs to Missouri. Opponents argue it will take power away from unions and lead to lower wages.

flickr

  A Missouri man who was fatally shot during a traffic stop was accused of exchanging gunfire with a state trooper days earlier.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol identified the man killed Wednesday as 35-year-old Troy Bateman, of Marshall. Investigators are trying to determine whether officers shot the man or if he suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound. An autopsy is being conducted.

The patrol says the confrontation began when Columbia police pulled over a car. Two women got out of the vehicle, and police fired at the car after they heard a gunshot.

Thomas Hawk / flickr

  A federal appeals court has revived a lawsuit challenging Missouri regulations limiting how alcohol producers and retailers can advertise.

An 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel on Thursday unanimously reinstated the 2013 lawsuit by the Missouri Broadcasters Association, a radio group, a retailer and winery.

U.S. District Judge Fernando Gaitan dismissed the lawsuit last year at the state's behest.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

  Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has made it clear he's opposed to state funding for stadiums, yet a revised proposal for a $200 million soccer stadium in St. Louis calls for the state to contribute land that's potentially worth millions of dollars.

An aldermanic committee delayed a vote Thursday to advance a measure putting the proposal, which also requires city voters to approve $60 million in funding, on the April ballot.

Courtesy Elliot Chapman

Farmers across the Midwest are trying to figure out how to get by at a time when expected prices for commodities from corn, to wheat, to cattle, to hogs mean they’ll be struggling just to break even.

“Prices are low, bins are full, and the dollar is strengthening as we speak and that’s just making the export thing a little more challenging,” says Paul Burgener of Platte Valley Bank in Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

usembassy_montevideo/Flickr

President-elect Donald Trump plans to pick former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to lead the Agriculture Department, a transition official and a source close to the process confirmed to NPR.

Trump is expected to make a formal announcement on Thursday, ending a months-long process that left Agriculture Secretary as the final Cabinet post to be filled.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back Columbia Public Schools teachers MELANIE KNOCKE and REX BELTZ! Still fresh off their trip aboard NASA's 'Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy', or SOFIA, Melanie and Rex will share their story once more at the kickoff to the 2017 Saturday Morning Science series January 28th at the Bond Life Sciences Center in Columbia. Today they talk about just what is "infrared astronomy" - watch! January 19, 2017

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

There's new life for a plan to have St. Louis taxpayers help fund a new downtown soccer stadium.

Eight days after the public funding proposal was declared all but dead, Alderwoman Christine Ingrassia on Wednesday requested a hearing before the city Ways and Means Committee. The hearing is set for Thursday.

Ingrassia says a revised proposal would ask voters to approve about $60 million in new tax revenue for the $200 million project. The earlier plan sought $80 million from the city.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The commissioner of Indiana's Department of Environmental Management will move to Missouri to lead the Department of Natural Resources under Gov. Eric Greitens.

Greitens announced Wednesday that Carol Comer will be the newest addition to his cabinet.

Comer worked under Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, who will be sworn in Friday as vice president.

In a video posted to Greitens' Facebook and Twitter accounts, Comer touted her success in partnering Indiana' environmental department with economic organizations to promote business and investment.

Ryan Ferguson
Bridgit Bowden / KBIA

A man whose conviction in a Columbia sports editor's death was overturned after spending nearly a decade in prison is closer to seeing his civil lawsuit go to trial.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that U.S. District Judge Nanette Laughrey ruled Tuesday that six officers aren't entitled to immunity shielding them from liability in Ryan Ferguson's case.

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri's Republican-led House has pushed forward a proposal to make Missouri the 28th right-to-work state despite Democratic efforts to send the measure to a public vote.

The House voted 101-58 Wednesday to give initial approval to the bill, which would ban mandatory union fees. The bill needs another House vote before it can move to the Senate.

The legislation is likely to pass following renewed momentum from the recent inauguration of Republican Gov. Eric Greitens, who has vowed to sign the bill that his Democratic predecessor vetoed.

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal? Also, Facebook’s newest effort to filter fake news, the ice storm that wasn’t, and 65 years of morning television. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, John Fennell and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

A doctor handed Melissa Morris her first opioid prescription when she was 20 years-old. She had a cesarean section to deliver her daughter, and to relieve post-surgical pain her doctor sent her home with Percocet. On an empty stomach, she took one pill and laid down on her bed.

“I remember thinking to myself, ‘Oh my god. Is this legal? How can this feel so good?’” Morris recalls.

Today Paul Pepper visits with JOHN MURRAY, Director of the University Concert Series, about all the different shows coming to the stages of Jesse Auditorium and Missouri Theatre over the next several months! Big Broadway shows like "Annie"; an intimate tribute to The Carpenters; "Odd Squad Live" for the kids; a performance by the entire St. Louis Symphony and more are on the way - watch for details! January 18, 2017

The Missouri Supreme Court is ordering Kansas City to put a proposed minimum-wage hike to $15 an hour on the ballot.

Supreme Court judges ruled Tuesday that a vote is needed before judges can decide if a wage increase is lawful.

A group of citizens had collected enough signatures to force a vote on minimum wage in 2015. But the vote was scheduled to take place after the enactment of a new state law prohibiting higher local minimum wages from the state's minimum wage.

Missouri's minimum wage is $7.70 an hour.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

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