News

MU Alert

As law enforcement searched for an armed suspect near the MU campus Wednesday night, the university failed to follow established protocols and procedures for alerting the MU community.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A measure allowing Missouri lawmakers to hire defense attorneys for lawsuits is moving forward.

Abigail Keel / KBIA

The most contentious part of a building a new school is shifting attendance boundary lines. Some families get to stay, others switch schools, leave friends, and if they’re lucky, get a shorter commute.

Today Paul Pepper visits with JANE ARMER, Professor at the University of Missouri's Sinclair School of Nursing, about "Living Well After Breast Cancer," an event/support group that focuses on 'getting through the difficult times.' If you're newly diagnosed or a survivor, please RSVP for this event today! April 16, 2015

Tyler Murry / KBIA

The Missouri Governor renewed his challenge to  Missourians to get outside and stay healthy.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

The Missouri Senate is sending back to the House a measure that supporters say will address problems with the state's flawed student transfer law. 

Updated 11:42 a.m.:

Christian Basi, the associate director of MU’s News Bureau, says that he is aware of concerns regarding the timing of MU’s Alert system Wednesday night following the shooting at Hitt Street Garage and is working to provide answers. While multiple witnesses said via social media they heard shots fired at Hitt Street Garage just before 11 p.m. Wednesday, the first MU Alert was not sent until 11:28 p.m. Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin tweeted Thursday morning saying that MU is investigating the process of issuing alerts and will report the results. Basi declined further comment. 

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When President Obama announced late last year that he would work toward ending the embargo on trade with Cuba, it wasn't just tourists perking up their ears. Midwest farmers and ranchers see communist Cuba as an untapped market for goods from the American Heartland. Harvest Public Media's Kristofor Husted reports on how agriculture interests are looking to cash in.


Missouri Capitol
David Shane / Flickr

One of the state’s most aggressive groups when it comes to recording Missouri Senate hearings has had enough with some senators saying no.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

MU Police are still investigating two cases of anti-Semitic graffiti in Mark Twain residence hall.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

City revenues from traffic violations that exceeded Missouri limits have not been properly distributed by the state to schools in counties where the money originated.

Farm Your Yard: Connecting Through Gardens

Apr 15, 2015
Carrie Hargrove / CCUA

On this installment of Farm Your Yard, the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture's Farm Manager Carrie Hargrove discusses the ways in which a garden can build community and reconnect us to the environment.


Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When President Obama announced in late 2014 that he would work toward ending the embargo on trade with Cuba, it wasn’t just tourists perking up their ears. Midwest farmers and ranchers see communist Cuba as an untapped market for goods from the American Heartland.

One of those farmers is Paul Combs, a rice farmer from southeast Missouri. Cuba can be an important market for farmers like Combs, who already depend on exporting their products.

“We’re excited about normalized relations with Cuba,” Combs said. “Until 1963, Cuba was the biggest market for U.S. rice.”


Juhan Sonin / Flickr

Think about the information your doctor’s office or health insurance provider collects about you: your address, birthday and social security number. But they also have your medical history, current conditions and information about your insurance policy connected to your file.

 

All of this information is incredibly personal and to a hacker, it's incredibly valuable.

 


Today Paul Pepper visits with DR. SUZANNE BURGOYNE, director of "The Beaux' Stratagem," a 'restoration comedy' by George Farquhar (and adapted by Thornton Wilder) on the stage at the Rhynsburger Theatre starting tomorrow night! At [4:49] VALERIE CHAFFIN tells us about "Bark and Brew and Meow Too," a five-course beer tasting birthday fundraiser for Second Chance at Bleu Restaurant this Saturday night. Tickets are going fast! April 15, 2015

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

Missouri lawmakers are proposing a 2-cent gas tax increase as a step toward easing a projected funding shortfall that officials warn could result in the deterioration of many roads and bridges.

Similar proposals considered Tuesday by the full Senate and by a House committee would raise the state's 17-cent fuel tax to 19 cents a gallon in January 2016.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A compromise between Missouri House and Senate Republicans that would lower the lifetime limit for temporary cash assistance for low-income families from 60 months to 45 months is moving forward.

The Senate on Tuesday approved by a vote of 25 to 9 the measure that would also impose stricter work requirements and higher sanctions for noncompliance.

missouri auditor tom schweich
State of Missouri

Investigators say Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich had talked for years of taking his own life but left behind no suicide note when he fatally shot himself several weeks ago.

Police in the St. Louis suburb of Clayton said Tuesday that they're nearing the end of their investigation and have found nothing to suggest the death of the Republican candidate for governor was anything other than a suicide.

Intersection / KBIA

Singer-songwriter Lee Ruth arrived in Columbia in 1962. In this week's Thinking Out Loud, self-described 'old guy' Lee Ruth discusses his musical influences, former students of whom he is especially proud and and what makes the Mid-Missouri music scene special. 

Courtesy NBC

Remember NBC’s franchise, “To Catch a Predator?” Chris Hansen does, and he hopes you do, too. The former network investigative reporter is launching a Kickstarter campaign to revive the one-time hit. If he’s successful in raising $400,000, his new program “Hansen vs. Predator” will run online while Hansen tries to sell it to a network.

Pinal County Sheriff

A man believed to be linked to the “Bitcoin Baron” Twitter account was arrested Thursday in Arizona.

“Bitcoin Baron” is the Twitter account that claimed responsibility for the cyberattacks against the City of Columbia and KOMU websites. According to Arizona Department of Public Safety officer Tim Case, Randall Tucker was charged with felony computer tampering, and is being held at Pinal County Jail.

Case says the Arizona Department of Public Safety is working with the FBI on the investigation.

Columbia Information Technologies Assistant Director Mark Neckerman says the attack resulted in a distributed denial of service, or DDoS, that prevented citizens from accessing the city’s website. This could prevent citizens from paying their utility bills or accessing city information.

Brian Turner / Flickr

  A Missouri lawsuit seeking class-action status accuses three insurance agencies of failing to safeguard consumer data from hackers who recently breached health insurer Anthem's computer networks.

A lawsuit first filed in February in St. Louis County on behalf of a Richmond, Missouri, woman was amended Tuesday to add three plaintiffs who allege personal data stolen during the breach is responsible for fraudulent tax returns filed in their name.

Hackers in December or January broke into an Anthem database that included names, employment details and Social Security numbers.

pills
images_of_money / flickr

  A new audit claims Missouri owes the federal government $34 million for not complying with Medicaid regulations.

A U.S. Department of Health and Human Services audit set for release Tuesday shows Missouri didn't bill drug manufacturers for rebates.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that meant drug companies kept more money while there was less for Medicaid recipients.

The Missouri Department of Social Services oversees the program and says it disagrees with the audit.

A department spokeswoman says the amount owed is closer to $7 million.

Abby Wendle / Harvest Public Media

Big farms are collecting taxpayer dollars that they haven’t necessarily earned by taking advantage of a loophole in government subsidy rules, according to regulators, members of Congress and the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is taking aim at what is known as the “actively engaged” loophole, which has been gaping for nearly three decades, by changing the qualifications for some subsidy payments. But many watchdog groups say a proposed fix fails to address the problem.


Today Paul Pepper visits with actor/director ED HANSON about "Next to Normal," a Pulitzer Prize-winning musical drama that centers around mental illness. See it on stage beginning April 17 at Talking Horse Productions in Columbia. At [5:10] ANNA DRAKE stops by to talk about "The Voices of Callaway" talent show that will benefit Heart of Missouri CASA! Watch for details. April 14, 2015

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