News

wobble-san/Flickr

Missouri’s so-called right to farm amendment will be added to the state Constitution after a statewide recount confirmed the original election results. 

Missouri is the second state after North Dakota to enshrine the right to farm in its constitution -- a move meant to protect farmers and ranchers from legislation that would change or outlaw practices they use.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • The right to farm amendment will be added to the state constitution after a recount.
  • The Columbia City Council voted to approve the city managers budget for fiscal year 2015.
  • The override of Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a law banning the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors could set up a showdown with the federal government.
chris nicastro
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

  State Education Commissioner Christine Nicastro announced this afternoon she’s resigning at the end of the year, ending a tumultuous run as the head of the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Nicastro, who’s served since 2009, has come under fire from Democrats and Republicans the past year as the state has dealt with unaccredited school districts and begun to implement  Common Core Standards.

Ashley Reese / KBIA

Archeologists now have a new reason to come to MU. As part of a new pilot program, the university is receiving artifacts on loan from the world's oldest museum, the Capitoline Museum of the City of Rome.

The MU Museum of Art and Archeology has already received its first loan- a set of 249 black-gloss ceramics dating back to the Roman Republic. The program will send a variety of loans to the university through December 31, 2017.

Opus Group

  At a hearing this morning at the Boone County Courthouse, plaintiffs working to stop the Opus student housing development filed a motion to change the judge in their case against the city.

Last Friday, Boone County Circuit Judge Kevin Crane granted and that same day lifted a new restraining order blocking the city and the Minneapolis-based Opus group from moving forward with construction.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

  Education officials are notifying Missouri community colleges that the state might reduce reimbursements for the A+ scholarship program.

The A+ program gives high school graduates who meet certain criteria reimbursements for two years of classes at a community college in the state.

Jane Piester, A+ Coordinator for Rock Bridge High School, said although there is currently a shortage of funding, she does not think the program is in danger long term.

  Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Last weeks veto session could have a long-term impact for the Missouri legislature.
  • New research suggests that schizophrenia may be eight distinct disorders.
  • Columbia youth had a chance to discuss community violence at a forum with the Mayors Task Force on Community Violence on Friday.

Columbia residents attend public forum to discuss violence

Sep 13, 2014
Timothy Maylander / KBIA

             The Mayor’s Task Force on Community Violence held its second of three public forums this week at Progressive Missionary Baptist Church last night. The public forums, titled “Let’s Talk CoMo” are designed to be community listening sessions where members of the public can talk with task force members and prominent community leaders about violence and how to stop it. About 75 people attended. The task force is focusing on what they believe are the four pillars of public safety: prevention, intervention, enforcement and re-entry.

Meet The Press / NBC

A visibly-nervous Chuck Todd took over last Sunday morning as the moderator of NBC's flagship political program, "Meet the Press." With the show having previously experienced a drop in ratings many wonder if audiences are over Sunday morning talk shows -- or if Todd has the power to turn things around. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

bottlerocketprincess / Flickr

Can there be too much of a good thing?

When money is concerned probably not, but corn on the other hand is certainly a yes.

farm
isnapshot / flickr

Missouri’s so-called right to farm amendment is expected to stand after preliminary recount results were posted on the Secretary of State’s website Friday. The controversial measure’s latest tally shows a slim change from the August primary results. 

Ameren Missouri to raise prices

Sep 12, 2014
Ameren logo
ForwardSTL

Electric customers of Ameren Missouri will see a small increase on their bills starting later this month.

Michael Cote / flickr

A respiratory illness is sending hundreds of kids to hospitals in ten states, including Missouri.  

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Local food is no longer just a novelty. Farmers markets are growing nationwide and farms that sell directly to consumers brought in $1.3 billion in 2012, up eight percent from just five years earlier.

MU students stand against violence

Sep 12, 2014
Andrew Hebert / KBIA

Despite the misting rain, some dedicated tigers stood clad in green on Lowry Mall Thursday to raise awareness for their cause. The Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center hosted the Green Dot Mizzou Day, a day constituted to the education and prevention of violence in our communities. Graduate Assistant at RSVP, Tim Maness, says that raising awareness is a team effort.

Paul Pepper: Maria Trevor, Harp Music (Performance)

Sep 12, 2014

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back harpist MARIA TREVOR. She performs, but first tells us about "Harp and Healing," which takes place every first Tuesday at Broadway Christian Church in Columbia. September 12, 2014

Jefferson City business leaders prepare for future

Sep 12, 2014
401k2013 via Flickr

Jefferson City has seen some improvements from its chamber of commerce since it underwent structural changes in September 2013.

The chamber wanted to narrow its focus on four areas: talent, growth, place and membership.

The chamber’s president and CEO Randy Allen said the chamber has been able to develop the workforce in the city.

“We’ve been working pretty hard on a couple particular areas and that is trying to retain some young people and then getting the new people to the companies connected to the community,” Allen said.

MoDOT plans bridge replacements

Sep 12, 2014
MoDOT

MoDOT is spending 115,000 dollars to aerial map Interstate 70 in Columbia to collect data for a bridge project. Central District Design Engineer Natalie Roark says the money for the project is designated in its budget.

“The money for performing the work has been identified in the statewide transportation improvement plan for completing the preliminary design work on the project, so it’s both federal and state transportation dollars,” Roark said.

Fox & Friends / Fox News

More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. After TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely. “Fox & Friends” co-hosts responded to the video with comments including “she still married him” and “the message is, when you're in an elevator, there's a camera." Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

PM Newscast for September 11, 2014

Sep 11, 2014
KBIA

The Columbia Community Development Department introduced its new neighborhood-planning program at a neighborhood congress last night at Boone County Public Health and Human Services. The department plans to start working with neighborhood associations around Columbia. City planner Rachel Bacon says the department wants to help each neighborhood association to create individualized objectives for their boroughs.

school buses
KBIA

A new program offers Missouri elementary students a healthy transportation alternative.

The Walking School Bus program allows students to exercise on their way to school. Missouri Safe Routes to School coordinator Jeff Cremer says the program works like normal bus transportation.

“The Walking School Bus program works similar to a regular school bus,” Cremer said. “Instead of riding in a bus, they’re walking to school and getting some exercise and having a good time on their way to school.”

Kirksville area recovers from severe storm

Sep 11, 2014
kirksville regional airport
City of Kirksville

The Kirksville area is recovering from a severe storm that swept through the area early Wednesday morning. The weather resulted in downed power lines, flooding, and power outages.

The Sherriff’s Department said there are no reported deaths or injuries directly related to the storm, although a public works employee was injured during cleanup yesterday, according to KTVO.

Adair County Sherriff Robert Hardwick encourages residents to always be prepared in case severe storms hit the area.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Jay Nixon has released $143 million of education funding that he had frozen, because lawmakers sustained most of his vetoes of tax-break bills.

Nixon announced the release of the money Thursday, after lawmakers concluded a veto session in which they overrode 47 line-item budget vetoes and 10 vetoes on other bills.

Travis McMillen

  

    

  More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. For months the NFL was criticized by activists, reporters and columnists for only having suspended him from the first two regular season games. But after TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely.Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Daniel Horacio Agostini via Flickr

 Hailing a cab may become a thing of the past in Columbia, but local taxi companies and city rules might get in the way.

Uber, a ride sharing service that connects riders and drivers through a smartphone app is looking to expand in Columbia. Missouri Business Alert’s Siddarth Vidnala went to see what people on both sides of the issue have to say.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

  Welcome to Under the Microscope, KBIA's weekly at stories in science, health and technology. I'm Maureen Lewis-Stump

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Updates from the veto session in Jefferson City
  • A new program will have children walking to school.
  • A report on the controversial drug midazolam.

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