News

Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

  

  

Catholic Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph

  Bishop Robert Finn is urging followers to pray for his successor.

The priest who led the Diocese of Kansas City-St Joseph in Missouri for nearly 10 years has resigned under a church law that allows bishops to leave early for illness or some "grave" reason that makes them unfit for office. But the resignation does not provide a specific reason.

In 2012, Finn pleaded guilty to failing to report a suspected child abuser, becoming the highest-ranking church official in the U.S. to be convicted of not taking action in response to abuse allegations.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  A top business priority for Missouri Republicans is heading to Gov. Jay Nixon's desk, but the measure did not get the number of votes needed to override a potential veto.

The Missouri House on Tuesday gave final approval to a measure that would cut unemployment benefits to as low as 13 weeks from the current 20 weeks. The measure passed 88-68, well short of the 109 needed to override a gubernatorial veto.

Nixon vetoed a similar measure last year, and an override attempt fell short by just two votes in the House after succeeding in the Senate.

Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week KBIA’s arts and culture segment producer Jenn Cooper hung out with the Columbia Jazz Jam group to explore Columbia’s Jazz scene during April’s Jazz Appreciation Month.


Gary Grigsby / KBIA

Thousands of bald eagles spend part of the winter in Missouri.  As winter approaches the eagles head south to eat fish from waterways that aren't frozen over as much as say, northern Minnesota.


A proposal to protect historic buildings in downtown Columbia will not effect the demolition of the downtown Shakespeare’s location. Following the denial of a proposed six-month moratorium the pizzeria will continue its relocation plans at the end of May and go through with the demolition and reconstruction.

Today Paul Pepper and DIANA MOXON talk about "Feast," a show that opens today at the Columbia Art League. Plus, Diana invites everyone to celebrate Columbia Art League Day (as proclaimed by Mayor McDavid) this Saturday in The District! At [4:06] YVONNE MATTHEWS tells us about this Thursday's Wellness Walk and Festival, which helps celebrate Lincoln University's 125th anniversary! Registration costs $18.90. April 21, 2015

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch photo staff is the winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography.

The journalism awards were announced Monday. The Post-Dispatch was honored for its photo coverage of protests that followed the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was black, by a white Ferguson police officer in August.

Attorney General's Office

The state's attorney general will defend the Missouri Senate in a lawsuit filed by a liberal advocacy group over alleged violations of the state's open records law.

Attorney General Chris Koster's office said Monday in a statement the office would provide legal counsel in the case involving administration of official Senate business.

Heather Adams / KBIA

Since 1975 schools have been mandated by law to provide free, appropriate education to all children, leaving states and schools to figure out what this means for educating children with special needs.The first school for the deaf in the United States opened in the early 1800’ s in Hartford, Connecticut.Since then new educational opportunities and laws have created a wide range of choices for students with disabilities.When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, there was a push for more inclusive education.This meant the closure of many separate, state - funded schools for the disabled across the country and new integration for children in standard public schools.But Missouri still has 34 state schools for the severely disabled. 


Council to Decide on Delaying Demolition of Historic Places

Apr 20, 2015
KBIA

The Columbia City Council is scheduled to vote Monday on whether to delay processing applications for the demolition of historic structures in Columbia.

While former Council member Barbara Hoppe proposed the ordinance just five days after Shakespeare’s Pizza announced plans to demolish its downtown location, the ordinance wouldn’t affect those plans.

  A Missouri Newspaper has brought home the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch photo staff was honored Monday for its coverage of the protests that followed the shooting death of Michael brown.

Casey Morell / KBIA

  The University of Missouri Museum of Art and Anthropology is back open after its 18 month closure, but you won’t be able to find it on campus.

The museum has relocated to Mizzou North, a location on Business Loop 70 West that it shares with the museum of Anthropology, which has yet to open.

Abigail Coursen/KBIA

The use of technology in classrooms is quickly becoming the new norm in education. At the beginning of this year the Columbia Public School District began issuing mini iPads to Battle High School students and to fifth graders at Mill Creek Elementary, through a program called “one-to-one.” But how do parents, and even teachers who may not be familiar with modern tools, make sure students are using them to their advantage? KBIA’s Abigail Coursen went to the workshop sponsored by the local library to report on this story.


Amy Mayer

It’s planting time for Midwest farmers and much of the corn they grow will end up feeding livestock in China, which has become a huge importer of grain from the Corn Belt. That means the farmers can’t just select seeds based on which ones will get the best yield. They have to think about where their grain will be sold.

China has its own rules for the kind of crops it wants and when American farmers don’t comply, China can close off its market.

In 2013, China discovered in U.S. corn a genetically engineered trait that, although permitted in the U.S., had not yet been approved in China. Chinese regulators rejected American corn because some of it contained the trait.

“When you hear China has banned all US corn,” said Ward Graham, a farmer in South-Central Iowa, “a person in my position? That’s not good.”


Rand Paul Versus The Media

Apr 20, 2015
Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Republican candidate Rand Paul is prickly. At least when he's being interviewed. Paul got into it with The Today Show's Savannah Guthrie, Fox News' Megyn Kelly and The Guardian's Paul Lewis. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss whose skin is thinner.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Driving down Main Street, Noel seems like any other small town in Southwest Missouri. There are a few diners, the bank, a grocery store. But there's also a Mosque.

Siyad Ahmed arrived in Noel in November of 2008. He said there were only seven other Muslim refugees from Somalia in the small town at the time, but they came together and selected him as their leader – or Imam.


Missouri Republicans have stuck to their commitment of not expanding Medicaid this session but some incremental changes to the system are moving forward.

Senate President Pro Tem Tom Dempsey said last week that they were taking what Republicans have characterized as Medicaid reform in small steps.

Tony Fischer / Flickr

  Research conducted at the University of Missouri indicates that more people are talking in advance about end-of-life wishes with their aged loved ones.

Jerome Delay / AP

Ethiopia's parliamentary elections are set to be held May 24th, but there is little doubt the ruling party will win an overwhelming majority amidst a crackdown on independent media and political dissidents. This week on Global Journalist, we look at why and how the restrictions on the media in Africa's second-most populous country began, and speak with a journalist who spent more than a year in prison for reporting.

Nonorganical / Flickr

  Sixteen national organizations are asking the University of Missouri to ensure the safety of Jewish students after anti-Semitic messages were found last week in a dorm.

Kodel / Flickr

  Bill Kempker always has his helmet on when riding a motorcycle. It is required by Missouri law that all the motorcyclists on the state highway wear a helmet. But once he leaves Missouri and travels through states like Arkansas, where wearing helmet is an option instead of requirement, he would take the helmet off. But Kempker and other motorcyclists might be able to do that in Missouri soon. The Missouri House on Monday approved the bill HB 523 by a vote of 97-57. The bill would allow riders who are at least 21 years old to go without helmets.

Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map

    

Mexico High School Teacher Accepts Teaching Award

Apr 17, 2015
Sydnee Stottlemyer/KBIA

The Missouri Alliance for Arts Education has awarded Mexico High School speech and theatre teacher Sara Given the creativity and Innovation in Teaching award. Given was recognized at the state capitol for creating the first ever Jellybean Speech Olympics competition. Given’s students who she affectionately calls her “Jellybeans” also performed at the capitol.


Flickr user Rona Proudfoot

On Sunday Hillary Clinton sent a tweet and posted a YouTube video announcing her candidacy for president. What is Clinton's campaign doing differently this time around? Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

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