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ALEX HEUER / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Missouri Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens often recounts how he volunteered in Bosnia helping children separated from their families by a horrific ethnic war.

KBIA

Defense attorneys in the wrongful-death lawsuit by Michael Brown's parents cite recent rampages that killed police in warning against expanding who can see unredacted grand jury transcripts related to Brown's death.

Timothy Smith / flickr

Preliminary testing shows lead contamination in the water in some St. Louis school buildings.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that tests conducted this summer revealed lead contamination in several buildings. St. Louis Public Schools spokesman Patrick Wallace says drinking fountains and sinks are shut off in several school buildings until pipes and faucets are replaced.

Joe Monin / flickr

Four groups led by the American Civil Liberties Union are asking Walgreens for reassurance that the drugstore's partnership with a Catholic system to run in-store clinics in the St. Louis area won't limit access to birth control.

SSM Health, a St. Louis-based Catholic system, owns 27 clinics in Walgreens stores in Missouri and Illinois. The clinics open later this month.

zensmom1 / Flickr

A judge has denied a motion to set aside a $1.4 million judgment against a developer that Joplin hired to help with tornado recovery work.

Jasper County Circuit Judge David Dally on Thursday denied the motion by Costa Bajjali to set aside the $1.4 million judgment, which was obtained by Joplin and the Joplin Redevelopment Corp. for default by the firm on its city contracts.

  A Missouri lawmaker is resigning to avoid a new waiting period for legislators to become lobbyists.

Hartville Republican Rep. Tony Dugger stepped down Friday. In an interview with The Associated Press, he cited a law set to take effect Aug. 28 that will require lawmakers to wait six months after their terms end before becoming lobbyists.

Dugger said he doesn't have a lobbying job lined up but wants to keep his options open.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back JANE WHITESIDES, Executive Director of the Missouri Symphony Society. Jane brought two Missouri Symphony Conservatory students to perform two pieces on the violin: "Autumn" at [3:00] and "Evening Prayer" at [5:15]. Watch! August 19, 2016

girl scout cookie cash box
Margaux Henquinet / KBIA

Efforts have been made to avoid the closure of some Girl Scout camps in Missouri.

ACLU / Wikimedia Commons

Four groups led by the American Civil Liberties Union are asking Walgreens for reassurance that the drugstore's partnership with a Catholic system to run in-store clinics in the St. Louis area won't limit access to birth control.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

There will be no jail time for 22 religious leaders convicted of trespassing for a 2014 protest in the Missouri Senate.

AP Photo

The attempted military coup against Turkey's democratically-elected government last month was plenty alarming.

But what's happened in the country since has many people worried as well. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government has arrested at least 6,000 people, and at least 60,000 more have been fired or suspended from their jobs.

The government has closed radio stations, charities, universities and even medical clinics.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the massive crackdown taking place in Turkey.


Arcadia Publishing

This week on Thinking Out Loud, Darren Hellwege talks with Mary Barille about her book, Haunted Columbia, Missouri while Trevor Harris meets MU's new leader of Athletic bands and visits with a co-organizer of Kirksville's new all-inclusive playground.


Today Paul Pepper and JOY SWEENEY, Executive Director of Council for Drug Free Youth, discuss marijuana use in young people. According to Joy, the challenge in making sure today's youth understand the consequences of their poor choices used to be in dealing with peer pressure, now it's dealing with lackadaisical parents. She says, "the marijuana of today is nothing like the marijuana of the '60s - it's not Woodstock weed anymore...it's like tripping on acid instead of smoking pot." August 18, 2016

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:


Today Paul Pepper and MEL ZELENAK, retired professor of economics at the University of Missouri, talk about asset allocation. Investing on your own may sound like a scary endeavor, but according to Mel, cutting out the middle man (i.e. the financial planner) will help you save 60%-70% a year in fees. Mel says, "you can get a little bit of help, but if you do it on your own, it literally takes three hours a year." Find out how! August 17, 2016

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A trial is underway against more than 20 clergy members who face charges stemming from a peaceful protest at the Missouri Capitol over Medicaid expansion.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Few things are more valuable to a farmer in the arid West than irrigation water. Without it, the land turns back into its natural state: dry, dusty plains. If a fast-growing city is your neighbor, then your water holds even more value.

Farm families in Western states like California and Colorado are increasingly under pressure to sell their water. It’s been coined “buy and dry,” as water is diverted from farm fields and instead used to fill pipes in condos and subdivisions.

KBIA is one of the five small newsroom finalists in the general excellence category in the 2016 Online News Association's Online Journalism Awards.

KBIA's entry included special projects like Here SayAccess Missouri, Mizzou at a Crossroads and An Uncertain Road: Life After Premature Birth.

Courtesy of the city of Columbia

The Columbia Regional Airport is set to have a new manager. The city of Columbia announced today that Tamara Pitts will step in on September 12 to assume the duties of airport manager.  

Don Elliot who has held the position since 2011 is retiring and will overlap with Pitts for two weeks to ease the transition, according to an announcement from the Department of Economic Development.

Discover Nature: Herons and Egrets Disperse

Aug 16, 2016
Missouri Department of Conservation

Discover Nature this week as herons and egrets begin to move out of their nests and head south for the season.


Mark Kim / KBIA

University of Missouri graduate assistants have raised concerns about whether the university monitored some private social media conversations amid student attempts to organize. 

Håkan Dahlström / Flickr

    The utility company Ameren Missouri is seeking approval from the state's Public Service Commission to build six public charging stations for electric vehicles between St. Louis and central Missouri.

Ameren Missouri announced the pilot program Monday. Mark Nealon, who is leading the project, said five of the stations will be between St. Louis and Boonville on Interstate 70, and one will be in Jefferson City on U.S. 54.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Ask Republican Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri about his party's presidential nominee and you'll likely get a polite but weary response.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has sided with the maker of Schlafly beer in its trademark dispute with conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly.

Chris Murphy / Flickr

The proposed $12.2 billion merger of Kansas-based Westar Energy with Missouri-based Kansas City Power & Light could be at the mercy of Missouri utility regulators whose staff has recommended the deal be rejected.

ALEX HEUER / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Eric Greitens has received $1 million from the Republican Governors Association for his Missouri gubernatorial campaign.

The contribution comes about a week after Greitens prevailed in a four-way Republican primary. It could help him replenish his finances for the Nov. 8 general election against Democratic Attorney General Chris Koster.

The most recent reports show Greitens had $628,000 in his campaign account as of July 21. Since then, he has received at least $1.5 million in donations of more than $5,000 each.

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