News

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KBIA file photo

A proposal that's key to Republican efforts to require people to show photo identification when voting has passed the Missouri Senate.

KBIA file photo

Some Missourians could have their criminal records sealed under a measure that has passed the Legislature.

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

The Missouri Legislature has voted to give adoptees a way to access their original birth certificates.

Join KBIA and the Missourian on Thursday, May 12, 2016, at 6:00 p.m. for a screening of this year's My Life, My Town short films about the lives of teens living in rural Missouri. The films will be screened in Fred Smith Forum (RJI 200) on the second floor of the Reynolds Journalism Institute at 401 S 9th St. in Columbia. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the My Life, My Town subjects and producers. Parking for this event is available in the nearby Hitt Street Garage. 

Panelists: 

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri senators have approved legislation to require a private company to review the state's welfare rolls.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

A U.S. District Judge has ruled in favor of the Columbia Planned Parenthood clinic – issuing a permanent injunction that protects the clinic’s license to perform abortions.

In her ruling on Wednesday, US District Judge Nanette Laughrey granted a permanent injunction to the clinic, therefore preventing the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services [DHSS] from revoking the clinic’s license.

Laughrey wrote that the department likely bowed to political pressure and unfairly revoked the clinic's license compared to how other facilities’ licenses are handled.

Columns and Jesse Hall
Adam Procter / Flickr

The University of Missouri is now projecting a drop in enrollment of 2,630 students for the next school year, which will contribute to a $31.4 million revenue shortfall for MU next year.

University of Missouri leaders briefed faculty and staff Wednesday with the latest figures on enrollment and the budget for the next fiscal year. Vice Chancellor of Finance Rhonda Gibler explained the cuts necessary to right the ship at MU will not be easy.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY - Lobbyists could spend up to $40 a day per lawmaker on meals under legislation pending in the Missouri Senate.

Republican Sen. Dave Schatz unveiled the proposal Wednesday that would ban most gifts to lawmakers and public officials but still leave them with a healthy limit for meals.

Lobbyist spending currently has no limit in Missouri.

Backers say the proposal is a step forward, but critics say it doesn't go far enough. House members previously had approved a ban on lobbyist gifts except for meals offered to all lawmakers and statewide officials.

Churchill Clark

On a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris featured a preview of the upcoming Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre season and this weekend's canoe camp at Cooper's Landing.


stopnlook / FLICKR

JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Legislature has passed a bill reviving a tax break for small businesses that add employees.

The bill given final approval Wednesday by the House allows businesses with fewer than 50 employees to claim a $10,000 tax deduction for each job they create that pays at least their county's average wage. Those businesses could claim a $20,000 deduction if they also cover at least half the cost of their employees' health insurance premiums.

The bill now goes to Gov. Jay Nixon.

KBIA file photo

ST. LOUIS - The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to halt Earl Forrest's execution hours before the Missouri man is scheduled to die by injection.

The court issued its ruling without comment today. Forrest is scheduled to die tonight at the state prison in Bonne Terre for the 2002 killings of Harriett Smith and Michael Wells in a drug dispute and Dent County Sheriff's Deputy Joann Barnes in a shootout that followed at Forrest's home.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, denied a clemency request earlier today.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics. Also, why an editorial cartoonist lost his job at an Iowa farm publication, how an ex-Obama administration official “sold” the media on the Iran deal, and a quick death for London’s newest newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Marijuana
lancerok / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A proposal to legalize medical marijuana has again failed in the Missouri House.

Lawmakers voted down the measure today, 85-71. The legislation would have allowed doctors to recommend marijuana for patients suffering from debilitating illnesses, such as AIDS or epilepsy.

The proposal also would have created a licensing regime for commercial marijuana growers and retailers.

House lawmakers killed a similar measure in April after scaling it back to only cover hospice patients.

ambulance
Creative Commons / Flickr

COLUMBIA - A Missouri hospital that helped stop a competing effort to build a psychiatric hospital two months ago has proposed a $21 million facility to fill the necessity for more inpatient psychiatric services.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that a hearing on the application of CenterPointe Hospital's proposed 72-bed psychiatric hospital in north Columbia is scheduled for July 11.

Discover Nature: The Eastern striped skunk

May 11, 2016
Missouri Department of Conservation

In Missouri, striped skunks are relatively common.  Harder to find, are Eastern spotted skunks. These smaller skunks have black fur with white stripes, and spots.

Spotted skunks inhabit open prairies, brushy areas and cultivated land, favoring cover under a brushy field border, fencerow or vegetated gully between their dens and foraging areas. 

They mate in late winter and give birth from April to July.

Skunks are good mousers and help control insects, thus they are an asset around farms… As scavengers, skunks help clean up the woods.

Sarah Kellogg / KBIA

Mid-Missouri is home to cows, horses and even alpacas, but not everyone knows it’s also home to lions, tigers and pumas. Nearly a dozen of these jungle cats live on a farm north of the Columbia Mall.

The D&D Farm and Animal Sanctuary, just off Old Highway 63, houses more than 100 animals on a farm about five miles north of the Columbia Mall. It’s named for its owners, Dale and Deb Tolentino. Dale, a former mailman, and Deb, a former veterinarian technician, spend their retired years caring for these animals, day in and day out. There are lions, tigers, ligers, bobcats, mountain lions, pumas, wolves and other predators.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

We all learned it as kids: Old MacDonald has a farm and on that farm he has a cow that says “moo.” But why? Why do cows moo?

Whenever I’m out reporting in the field I can tell many ranchers have a powerful connection with their cattle – they can almost understand them. But researchers today are trying to figure out exactly what cows are saying.

Today Paul Pepper and PAULA SCHULTE, Marketing Coordinator at Missouri River Regional Library, talk about a program called Passport Jefferson City, which aims to "get people to get out and see their own backyard - as it were." It'll be a fun time for the whole family - watch for details! And speaking of family fun, at [4:12] DENNIS VanDYKE and BRAD BRYANT invite everyone to the Marceline Railroad Heritage Celebration this Saturday at the Walsworth Community Center in Marceline! May 11, 2016

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

The Legislature has passed a grant program aimed at attracting conventions to Missouri.

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Håkan Dahlström / Flickr

Missouri students would have to take CPR training and pass a civics exam before graduating high school under proposals that have cleared the Legislature.

Missouri Division of Tourism

Authorities say a young girl was hospitalized after her arm was impaled on a fence outside the governor's mansion.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Senators have voted to increase how much money aging, blind and disabled Missourians on Medicaid can keep in assets.

Senators passed the legislation 29-1 Tuesday, but it heads back to the House because of Senate changes.

Aging, blind and disabled Missourians on Medicaid currently can't keep more than $1,000 in assets such as savings, or $2,000 for married couples. Republican Sen. Bob Dixon says that contributes to a cycle of dependency.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Legislation limiting public access to police body camera videos has won final approval in Missouri in a move that some supporters hope will help encourage their use.

The bill's passage Tuesday comes nearly two years after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson touched off massive protests over the way police interact with residents.

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri Legislature has passed a bill aimed at giving divorced parents more equal custody over their children.

The House voted 154-2 Tuesday to prohibit courts from presuming a parent is more qualified to be a guardian based on his or her sex. The Senate passed the legislation on a 28-0 vote two weeks ago, so now it heads to the governor.

If a divorcing couple disagrees on how to share custody, the court would have to settle on written findings of fact before resolving the dispute.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics.

Philip Bump, Washington Post: “Did Facebook bury conservative news? Ex-staffers say yes

Jason Baldwin

Jimmy Pardo is a pioneer. For ten years he has hosted the popular podcast Never Not Funny, and has welcomed guests like Paul Reiser, Amy Poehler, and Jon Cryer. Jimmy is also one of the most respected comedians working today, and continues to tour around the country. 

For several years Jimmy worked on both Conan and The Tonight Show as the opening act for Conan O' Brien. Jimmy is heavily involved with the charity Smile Train, an organization that provides surgery to fix cleft lips for children who otherwise couldn't afford it. This Comedian's Life talked to Jimmy about giving back, working for Conan, and his long-time friendship with actor Jon Hamm. Jimmy will be performing live at the Funny Bone in St. Louis on June 3rd and 4th. Tickets can be purchased at stlouisfunnybone.com. For more information about Smile Train, go to SmileTrain.org.

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