News

Yannis Liakos / AP Photo

Greece's last two bailouts failed to rescue the country. This week, European leaders approved a new $95 billion package for the debt-stricken country. For Greeks, it means more tax hikes and cuts to pensions and other public spending–an option they soundly rejected in a nonbinding referendum in July. Still some argue that this bailout is different than the previous two – and that it may set the country on the path to recovery.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

The Chipotle Cultivate Festival had it all: an indie pop band on stage, long lines at the beer booths, folks hanging out on a hot summer day.

Sort of like a Grateful Dead concert, only with free burritos.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

 In the Midwest, agriculture can be such a strong lure that there are some farm kids without farms.

Ally Babcock lives with her family in a modern subdivision in Ames, Iowa. Tucked under the home’s back deck is a tiny barn space, enough room for her sheep and rabbits.

Matt Veto / KBIA News

The city of Columbia will stop burning coal at its power plant in mid-October.

HOK/360 ARCHITECTURE

A Missouri board has approved $15 million in tax credits for a new St. Louis football stadium, part of a push by the state to counter efforts by Rams owner Stan Kroenke  to move the team to Los Angeles.

Veronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

  Regulators in Missouri are ordering more safeguards and a backup plan at the Bridgeton Landfill, where smoldering waste sits near discarded nuclear material.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

St. Louis County faces sharp criticism from several organizations over belatedly filing criminal cases against protesters arrested in Ferguson last year following the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

St. Louis County seal
File Photo / KBIA

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded $24 million to St. Louis County to aid community betterment projects in distressed areas.

YouTube / Passion For Truth Ministries / Passion for Truth Ministries

A St. Louis-area pastor who admits bilking $3.3 million from at least 18 mostly elderly investors has been ordered to spend seven years in federal prison.

Horia Varlan via Flickr

The city of St. Louis says it will refund roughly $5.6 million to motorists who paid red-light camera tickets over the past year and a half.

Emotions are running high 10 years after Hurricane Katrina made landfall on New Orleans, so what was a Chicago Tribune columnist thinking when she wrote that she prayed for a storm like Katrina to wipe out Chicago? Also, how Pro-Publica and the New York Times worked together to determine a special relationship between AT&T and the National Security Agency, Sesame Street’s move to HBO and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

At the beginning of the summer, the US Department of Agriculture announced its goal to serve 200 million meals to low-income children through the summer meals program, which is 13 million more than it served last year. The USDA is also highlighting several new ways of reaching kids in rural areas of the country.

As the summer comes to a close, I spoke with US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack about the program’s growth and the USDA’s success in serving rural communities.


Today Paul Pepper and LAURIE KNAUF, Central Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, talk about added sugars. Are you a chronic soda drinker? Before you pop that next tab, take a look at what the sugar content of just one soda a day for one week looks like. At [4:18] BARBARA BUFFALOE, Sustainability Manager for the City of Columbia, tells us why you should be composting - "it's way more than just throwing fruits and vegetables in a hole in the backyard!" - and how the city can help get you started! August 19, 2015

gun
~Steve Z~ / flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that a state constitutional amendment on gun rights does not allow convicted felons to possess firearms.

KBIA

The Missouri auditor said mismanagement over hiring a master developer after the Joplin tornado has raised enough concerns that findings have been turned over to authorities.

Chris Blakeley / Flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled against traffic camera ordinances adopted in several cities.

Courtesy Chicago Tribune

At a time when so many are writing anniversary stories looking back on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina,  Chicago Tribune columnist Kristen McQueary wrote a column under the headline "In Chicago, Wishing for a Hurricane Katrina."

That headline was changed after readers took great offense to McQueary's assertion that the city of Chicago needs a storm the size and strength of Katrina to reset the city's mounting debt, it's struggling schools and it's political infighting.

Emerald O'Brien / KBIA

  The announcement Friday that the University of Missouri will no longer provide subsidies for health insurance to graduate students is provoking a strong response from students and faculty.

Ben Warner is an assistant professor of communication at the University of Missouri. He went to the Claire McCaskill's book signing event at the Columbia Mall Monday to get more than just a signature – he was also looking for advice from McCaskill for students. 

Today Paul Pepper visits with Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church Pastor, MEG HEGEMANN, about Turning Point Ministry. "We're about dignity and hope for our neighbors experiencing homelessness." Watch our interview for details on how to get involved and support those who have fallen on hard times. August 18, 2015

Authorities have evacuated some guests at a Columbia motel after they say a man found an explosive device in a nearby vacant parking lot and brought it inside.

St louis
paparutzi / Flickr

  St. Louis' credit rating has been downgraded by a credit rating agency.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

Graduate Students Discuss Next Step After Losing Health Insurance

Missouri Gas Station Owners Group Backs Cigarette Tax Hike


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

On Friday, many University of Missouri graduate students found out via email they would no longer receive help from the university to pay for their health insurance. The response on social media was strong and on Monday graduate students from across campus gathered to discuss their concerns and plan for their next step. 

cigarette
Sudipto_Sarkar / flickr

A group of Missouri gas station and convenience store owners is backing taxing cigarettes an additional 23 cents per pack.

Today Paul Pepper and LORENZO LAWSON, Executive Director at Youth Empowerment Zone, look back on the experiences 20-25 underprivileged youths had while taking part in the YEZ summer camp, and what they can look forward to this fall! If you or someone you know would like to get involved (on any level) - we tell you how! August 17, 2015

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