News

City of Columbia

The Columbia City Council has appropriated a $25,000 donation from the Columbia Cosmopolitan Luncheon’s Club towards improvements to the Frank G. Nifong Memorial Park in Columbia.

The club will be repeating the donation for the next five years, totaling $125,000 for the project, according to sixth ward city council member Betsy Peters.

“According to the information that we got, the donated funds are going to supplement a $250,000 improvement for the park,” Peters said.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Top officials for Monsanto and Bayer are defending their proposed $66 billion merger as a deal that could help American farmers through greater investments in technology. They made the case Tuesday to skeptical senators worried the merger could hurt American farmers already struggling with lower crop prices and higher seed costs.

The combination of the American seed and weed-killer and German medicine and farm-chemical maker would create a global agricultural and chemical giant with a broad array of products.

Dey / Flickr

A spokesman for a campaign to allow medical marijuana in Missouri says the proposal likely won't go to voters this year.

New Approach Missouri spokesman Jack Cardetti said Tuesday that a Cole County circuit judge won't count at least some contested petition signatures needed to get the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signed petitions. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

Challiyan / Flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court says voters will get to decide whether to raise cigarette taxes to benefit early childhood programs.

Judges ruled Tuesday that the proposal will stay on the Nov. 8 ballot.

The measure would phase in a 60-cent-per-pack increase of the state's lowest-in-the-nation tobacco taxes. It also would raise fees by 67 cents a pack for off-brand cigarettes, in addition to the tax hike.

Cigarette giant Reynolds American Inc. is backing the proposal.

Courtesy Prixas Films via Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden?

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

 

   The Senate is set to take a closer look at a proposed $66 billion merger of American seed and weed-killer company Monsanto and German medicine and farm chemical maker Bayer.

The deal combines two of the six U.S. and European companies that dominate the agrochemical market, and would create a global agricultural and chemical giant with a broad array of products. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley of Iowa has said he's concerned that the consolidation could hurt American farmers who are already worried about rising costs.

Daniel Aubuchon

You can find Don Waterman working at the Columbia Bass Pro Shops, checking people out at the register or helping customers find what they’re looking for. But now he’s casting his line for the state legislature.

Waterman is running as the Republican candidate for the District 46 House of Representative’s seat. He got his first taste of politics by working for Danie Moore’s campaign in the 2008 state election primaries. Now, as a candidate, Waterman wants to tackle Missourians’ access to mental health facilities.

Missouri Department of Conservation

“Way down yonder in the pawpaw patch” is an old song you might be familiar with, but today, surprisingly few Missourians know a pawpaw tree when they see one. This week on Discover Nature brought to you by the Missouri Department of Conservation we find the pawpaw.

Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

Living in the Platte River Valley in central Nebraska means understanding that the water in your well may contain high levels of nitrates and may not be safe to drink.

“When our first son was born in 1980, we actually put a distiller in for our drinking water here in the house,” says Ken Seim, who lives in the Platte Valley near the town of Chapman, Nebraska. “And at that time our water level was a 12 parts per million.”

Nitrates are formed when nitrogen, from the air or fertilizer, is converted by bacteria in the soil to a form that is more plant-friendly. Nitrates help plants grow, but can be dangerous in large amounts. The legal limit in public water systems is 10ppm. Some nearby wells, Seim says, contain nitrates at dangerous levels, two or three times the legal threshold.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia City council voted Monday night to approve a $440.9 million budget for the 2017 fiscal year. The budget included some increases in residential and commercial utility fees, and spending to hire four new police officers.

City Manager Mike Matthes provided a brief presentation over the utility fees and explained that although it may look as if there is a deficit in the budget, there is not.

Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society

Portland, Missouri will be the site for the first-ever “Cruising Callaway” tour hosted by the Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society this Sunday. The tour will highlight communities throughout Callaway County.

Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society board member Diane Burre Ludwig hopes that this new tour series will revitalize towns around the county.

“Every smaller community has importance and relevance and has gotten Callaway County to where it is, so we want to take time to reach out and recognize them,” Burre Ludwig said.

Today Paul Pepper visits with DR. MAR DOERING, All Paws Medical & Behavioral Center, about separation anxiety in pets. With school back in full swing, your beloved Rover and Fluffy are now left to spend a good portion of the day at home by themselves. How can we make saying goodbye every morning easier for everyone? Dr. Doering has some ideas! September 20, 2016

Missouri's contest for the U.S. Senate between Democrat Jason Kander and Republican Roy Blunt is getting more national attention - and money.

Washington is abuzz about Kander's new TV ad, which shows him assembling an assault weapon blindfolded. Aside from being creative, the ad also highlights the key roles of guns and the military in both campaigns.

Outside groups are running attack ads the claim Blunt hasn't done enough for veterans, while the NRA is accusing Kander of being soft on gun rights.

Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

A Missouri initiative to re-instate campaign contribution limits has cleared its final legal hurdle to appear on the November ballot.

The state Supreme Court on Monday turned down a request to hear a challenge of the proposed constitutional amendment.

The proposal known as Constitutional Amendment 2 would limit contributions to candidates to $2,600 per election and cap donations to political parties at $25,000.

Missouri's previous campaign contribution limits were repealed in 2008. Since then, some donors have routinely given five- and six-figure checks.

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

Supporters of a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri say thousands of signed petitions to get the measure on the ballot were wrongly tossed out.

A lawyer for the group New Approach Missouri told a circuit judge Monday that enough registered voters signed a petition to get the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander's office says the proposal fell about 2,200 short of signatures needed.

City of Columbia / como.gov

This week on Intersection, we talk with Columbia Mayor Brian Treece about issues including downtown development, transportation and expanding the police force. Listen to the full episode and check out selected clips from the interview below. 

Listen to the full interview.


Email offers clues to University of Missouri search

Sep 19, 2016
University of Missouri System

  Newly obtained emails show that five to nine candidates made the cut to be semifinalist for the job of leading the four-campus University of Missouri system.

The Columbia Daily Tribune  reports that the disclosure was made in internal emails from last month recommending a car service for presidential search interviews.

Few details have been released about the presidential search. The paper obtained the email through an open records request.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Contaminated drinking water isn’t just a problem for Flint, Michigan. Many towns and cities across the Midwest and Great Plains face pollution seeping into their water supplies. A big part of the problem: farming and ranching.

Today Paul Pepper and PAUL BAUM talk about this weekend's Walk Back in Time in Mexico, Mo! Thanks to a large number of committed reenactors, Baum says, "you should get the visual impression that you are there in Colonial times or in the middle of World War II." Watch for details, and to see a few photos from last year! At [3:22] TODD DAVISON, Artistic Director of Maples Repertory Theatre, talks about 'Church Ladies,' 'Pinkalicious,' and their entire 2017 season, so get ready to mark those calendars! September 19, 2016

Missouri will host the pilot project for an initiative to make radio history available through a national archive.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Radio Preservation Task Force, overseen by the Library of Congress, is collecting and cataloging radio recordings. Missouri is the pilot in part because of preservation efforts already made in St. Louis and Kansas City.

Frank Morris / Harvest Public Media

Bankers say weak farm income continues to weigh down the economy in rural parts of 10 Plains and Western states.

The overall rural economic index for the region remained in negative territory and declined to 37.3 in September from August's 41.1.

Survey officials say any score below 50 on any of the survey's indexes suggests a decline in that area.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss says farm income is expected to decline 12 percent over last year. that is limiting spending by farmers and hurting the economy in rural areas.

Thinking Out Loud: Poet Laureate Aliki Barnstone

Sep 16, 2016
John Farmer de la Torre

The State of Missouri's poet laureate,  Aliki Barnstone, spoke with KBIA's Darren Hellwege on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back local storyteller LARRY BROWN, who tells us about "a shadow that falls on September 17th." What is "the shadow?" Larry tells us that on Constitution Day, the shadow from the Washington Monument will fall on the steps of the Capitol Building, and that's not the only landmark it's known to touch throughout the year. Coincidence? Hmmm... September 16, 2016

Jody Cook

The City of Columbia Volunteer Programs will hold its second Recycling Ambassadors training session on Tuesday, Sept. 20.

Volunteers will train Columbia residents on proper recycling procedures. Volunteer Program Specialist, Jody Cook, says the Recycling Ambassadors program aims to create a communication between trained ambassadors and people who don’t recycle.

“We train citizens about the proper recycling and the City of Columbia’s recycling programs, and those trainees in turn go out and educate other people on proper recycling in Columbia,” Cook said.

Missouri Supreme Court To Rule On Tobacco Tax Hike

Sep 16, 2016
Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

The Missouri State Supreme Court heard arguments on Thursday on a proposed statewide tobacco tax hike.

Amendment 3 would modify the state constitution to allow an increase on cigarette taxes every year through 2020 and create an annually increasing fee of 67 cents per pack paid by wholesalers. The funds created would then be deposited into a new Early Childhood Health and Education Trust Fund. An estimated $263-374 million would be generated from this amendment.

Pages