News

Missouri Historical Society to Build Research Center, Museum

Aug 8, 2016
Chris Yunker / Flickr

  The State Historical Society of Missouri has revealed conceptual drawings of a planned $35 million research center and museum.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that the three-story Center for Missouri Studies will house museum galleries on the first floor and collections of manuscripts and newspapers set aside for researchers on the second floor. The third floor will house the society's administrative offices.

The construction of the building is being funded by state revenue bonds.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is defending his record after the head of the state's public defender system appointed him to a case in protest of recent funding restrictions.

Director Michael Barrett in a letter last week said budget cuts have prevented his office from hiring enough public defenders for those who can't afford representation.

So Barrett said he's appointing former attorney general Nixon to represent indigent clients.

JASON ROSENBAUM | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

  An audit of the Missouri Department of Higher Education takes issue with a now-defunct the loan program it still oversees.

The Advantage Missouri program paid out a total of $8 million in student loans from 1998 to 2005. The audit finds that $5.2 million of those $8 million have still not been repaid.

  

Auditor Nicole Galloway said there are no procedures to monitor and resolve amounts due on defaulted loans, and that higher ed officials do not know the current status of each outstanding loan or whether it’s collectible.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

    

Growing up on a family farm in West Bend, Iowa, Haley Banwart and her brother were like other farm kids. They did chores, participated in 4-H, and even raised cattle together.

“My brother and I have had the same amount of responsibilities. I can drive a tractor, I can bale square hay,” Banwart says. “But it was just expected that my brother would return home.”

She says they never discussed it, she just accepted that she’d find a different path.

Sebastian Martinez / KBIA

After years of preparation, a new 15-acre prairie is beginning to sprout at the Columbia Audubon Nature Sanctuary in west Columbia.

turkletom / flickr

Missouri State University researchers who are trapping mosquitoes across the state haven't found any evidence of the Zika virus.

Kansas City's police chief is taking some criticism from area police union leaders for his recent comments about shootings of black men by officers.

Nathan Lawrence / Click on the image to view more.

Fans of the old Shakespeare's Pizza in downtown Columbia may experience a slight feeling of deja vu as they enter its new home on the original site—that's because nearly all aspects of the space have been recreated.

"The original dining room is the same. A lot of the wood panels on the walls are the same boards—we numbered those and put them back in the same order to keep the pattern of wear the same,"  Shakespeare's manager Kurt Mirtsching explained. "We had detailed photographs of the entire restaurant, so we tried to put things back as much as we could in the same fashion."

J. Stephen Conn / flickr

Authorities say a 16-year-old student from Seoul, South Korea, who drowned in Missouri, had been attending a picnic to welcome participants in a two-year residential, early college program.

Jae Won Lee drowned Monday night in an unsupervised swimming area in the Mozingo Lake Recreation Park in northwest Missouri. He was a first-year student at the MissouriAcademy, a program on the Northwest Missouri State campus. It replaces the junior and senior years of high school.

ZACH KLAMANN / HEARTLAND HEALTH MONITOR

A federal judge who quashed Missouri's push to revoke a Planned Parenthood clinic's abortion license has ordered state taxpayers to pay more than $156,000 to cover the organization's legal bills tied to the dispute.

U.S. District Judge Nanette Laughrey this week ruled that the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services must pay $156,631 in attorneys' fees and expenses incurred by what now is Planned Parenthood Great Plains.

Kyle Spradley / Curators of the University of Missouri

Missouri college students this year could get more money from a need-based scholarship from the state.

Gov. Jay Nixon during a visit to Missouri Southern State University in Joplin on Friday announced the state is upping the maximum amount available through the AccessMissouri scholarship.

Students from low-income families who met eligibility requirements previously could get as much as $1,850 a year at four-year colleges and universities. They now can get as much as $2,250.

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Attorney General Chris Koster has scored a major endorsement, becoming the first Democratic statewide candidate to win the backing of the Missouri Farm Bureau.

Members of the Farm Bureau's political action committee voted to endorse Koster's gubernatorial campaign Friday after also listening to a presentation from Republican nominee Eric Greitens.

Koster and Greitens both won primaries earlier this week. The Farm Bureau event has become a traditional kick-off for the general election campaign. But until Koster, the group had never backed a statewide Democratic candidate.

AP

Republican nominee Donald Trump has commanded blanket media coverage since his run for U.S. president took off last year.

But it's not just Americans who have been glued to their screens when Trump's face appears. Government leaders and ordinary people around the world have taken notice as well.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we talk to reporters from around the world to gather the international reaction to Trump's proposals to ban Muslim immigration, cancel trade deals and consider pulling the U.S. out of NATO.


Today Paul Pepper welcomes back local barbershop quartet the Boone County Hams! They perform two songs that are sure to put you  in a good mood: "Mandy" at [1:40] and "Goodnight, Sweetheart" at [4:40]. There are two chances to see the Hams in concert coming up - watch for details! August 5, 2016

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:


dbking / Flickr

Missouri's largest airport could soon get a name change.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (http://bit.ly/2aQNHDz ) reports that the region's airport commission is considering changing the name of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport to St. Louis International Airport at Lambert Field.

KBIA / Davis Dunavin

Visitors to the Marion County Courthouse in Hannibal are asking: What's that smell?

The Hannibal Courier-Post reports that a foul odor has permeated the courthouse recently, something akin to a dead animal, but no animal has been found.

Commissioners believe the smell may be decaying remains of pigeons that got into the building about a month ago through a broken window in the rotunda. Workers shooed out the pigeons at the time and replaced the window, but Presiding Commissioner Lyndon Bode says some of the pigeons may have been hidden from view and later died.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

Converting lawn grasses and turf into native plantings that attract pollinators and desirable wildlife is a process. An upcoming workshop at Powell Gardens is for landowners seeking to convert turf grass.


Suzanne Hogan / For Harvest Public Media

Urban farms and gardens are popping up in cities all over the country, often touted as the key to a sustainable lifestyle, as creating healthy vibrant communities and promoting economic development. A new study by the John Hopkins Center for a Livable Future , however, says urban agriculture advocates need to be careful about overselling the benefits.

CCUA / Facebook

For the last seven years, I have spent a lot of time with rotting food. I could tell you some things that would surprise you about the decomposition of different things. For example, avocado skins just don’t break down. Neither do egg shells. Fur really doesn’t go anywhere either. And while it takes a long time to break down, bread from Panera will turn blue as it does- lots of preservatives in that one.

Today Paul Pepper visits with DR. CHRISTELLE ILBOUDO, MU Health Care, about the continuing spread of the Zika virus. Zika has actually been around since the 1940s, but has only recently entered the Americas thanks to a new strain, the Asian strain; Dr. Ilboudo says, "the Asian strain is the one that is causing more trouble and is creating that trouble in populations that have never seen Zika before." There are still a lot of unknowns, but it remains a fascinating conversation. Watch! August 4, 2016

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The head of Missouri's public defender system says he is appointing Gov. Jay Nixon to handle a case in protest of declining funding.

Emma Brown / for KBIA

When the first busload of campers arrived at Camp Sabra in Missouri’s Lake of the Ozarks this summer, they were greeted by more than one hundred cheering, dancing and hugging counselors.

For the first time in four years, Sydney Aaranson was not one of those counselors.


vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Boone County Voters chose candidates for district commissioner in Tuesday’s Primary Election.

Columbia voters approved Proposition 1 in Tuesday's primary election. Prop 1 would increase taxes from 4 percent to 5 percent at hotels and motels, and the money would be used to make improvements at the Columbia Regional Airport, including building a new terminal.

 

University of Missouri Law School / MU

Political novice Josh Hawley has toppled Missouri state Sen. Kurt Schaefer in the hotly contested Republican primary race for attorney general.

Today Paul Pepper visits with DANIELLE WOODS, RN about the mission behind McCallum Place Eating Disorder Centers. There's a 'large spectrum' of eating disorders, and how it affects you has a lot to do with the makeup of your brain. Our online lives plays a role, too; as Danielle says, "instead of really focusing on loving ourselves and the body that we're in, a lot of times we shift our attention to looking like something else that we think society wants us to look like." Plus, find out about the upcoming NEDA Walk in Columbia! At [4:40] KIMBERLY GRIFFIN and RICARDO COSTA invite everyone to Bradford Research Center's annual "Organic Field Day" August 11th. The highlight this year will be chemical-free weed control - watch for details! August 3, 2016

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