News

Ben Ozburn / Flickr

UPDATE 8:11 p.m.:

University of Missouri Athletics has announced Cuonzo Martin will be the new head coach for the Missouri men's basketball team. There will be a public "celebration" at Mizzou Arena at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 20.

Original story:

According to several news outlets, UC Berkeley Head Basketball Coach Cuonzo Martin has resigned from his current position to take up a role as head coach at the University of Missouri.

GEORGE KENNEDY: MU Journalism Grads Make Us Proud

Mar 15, 2017
Missouri School of Journalism

 You’ll agree, I suspect, that there has been almost too much bad news this week.

In addition to the usual kerfuffle emanating from Washington, we learned that our university has fired its loyal and decent basketball coach. He wasn’t surprised, I’m sure. He didn’t win. Attendance dropped. In the major leagues of college athletics, the bottom line is the bottom line.

Then came the state auditor’s report criticizing the university for employing some classic capitalistic incentives to reward executives in what is, in many ways, a socialistic institution. Those folks didn’t have a won-loss record on which they could be judged. Nor, the auditor found, were there other reliable standards for determining their bonuses...

Read the complete column at the Missourian.


Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw? Also, President Trump’s tax returns, new surveillance video of Michael Brown raises new questions about what happened in Ferguson in 2014, why Missouri’s two largest newspapers are teaming up to challenge Gov. Eric Greitens, and what happens when the local television newscast moves out of town. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

 

After court documents unsealed Tuesday raised questions about its research methods, chemical giant Monsanto says it did not ghostwrite a 2000 study on the safety of glyphosate, the active ingredient in its flagship pesticide Roundup.

As the New York Times reported, the unsealed records suggest that Monsanto had contributed to research attributed to academics and that a senior official at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had worked to stall a review of Roundup’s main ingredient by U.S. regulators.

Today Paul Pepper and MEL ZELENAK talk about the recent addition of United Airlines to the Columbia Regional Airport, and what that might mean for it's aging facilities. Also, have you ever considered traveling with just a one-way ticket? It might save you thousands of dollars - watch for details! March 15, 2017

A federal lawsuit claims that a St. Louis suburb is violating federal housing laws by disproportionately revoking occupancy permits of blacks, women and disabled residents.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council's lawsuit filed Monday accuses Maplewood of violating the Fair Housing Act.

The lawsuit claims that at least two police calls can put someone on the list of "chronic nuisances." That's without a conviction or even when that person is the victim of the crime that triggered the police call.

via Flickr user Matt Spiel

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw?

Mike Scott, New Orleans Picayune: “Why you should be listening to ‘Missing Richard Simmons’

Just under 1,000 elementary school students in Columbia will switch schools in Fall 2018. The Columbia Board of Education approved new attendance areas for elementary schools at its meeting Monday night.

The boundaries, approved by a 6-to-1 vote, are part of the plan for the new Cedar Ridge elementary school on the east side of town.

Five other schools are affected by the changes: Rock Bridge, New Haven, Lee, Shepard and Benton.

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The University of Missouri will pay $80,000 to a search firm helping the university find a new men's basketball coach.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the university released details of its contract with the Parker Executive Search firm on Monday.

The fee doesn't include direct expenses, which are capped at $9,600. The contract also doesn't include costs for such things as committee travel and background investigations, which will be billed separately.

Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture / Facebook

Not to toot my own horn, but I have a great backyard garden. I really can’t take much of the credit for my backyard garden because I am lucky to have amazing soil in my backyard. Without good, living soil, I wouldn’t be much of a gardener.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Fire plays an important role in all of our lives. To some, memories of campfires bring warm and pleasant feelings, while others remember the horrors of wildfires. This week on Discover Nature, we look at how fire is used as a land management tool.

This week on Intersection, we talk about the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran's Hospital's new patient education center and the hospital's patient-centered approach. Our guests are Communications Specialist Heather Brown, Health Promotion Disease Prevention Program Manager Jennifer Schmidt, Public Affairs Officer Stephen Gaither and MOVE! program participant and veteran Kent Lewis.

Listen to the full episode here: 


Judge Approves Settlement in Wrongful Death Lawsuit of Columbia Firefighter

Mar 14, 2017
University Village Apartments
Miranda Metheny / KBIA

A settlement in the wrongful death lawsuit brought by the family of a Columbia firefighter against the UM System Board of Curators was approved by a judge Monday. 

The sum of the settlement remains confidential.

On Feb. 22, 2014, Lt. Bruce Britt died when a walkway where he was standing partially collapsed. He and other firefighters had responded to a report of a roof collapse at the University Village apartments, which were owned by MU. 

Today Paul Pepper visits with JUDY ARNET, RD, about National Nutrition Month and healthy eating choices. If you're looking to change your diet but struggling with where to start, Judy offers easy and simple tips that don't upend everything you know! Looking for more? Come to 'Frozen Meals and More' at the Columbia Public Library March 28. At [4:44] CHRIS OLIVER is here with details on "Sinners and Saints: The Heroes and Villains of Broadway," also known as MU Theatre Department's Musical Revue. Songs from seventeen Broadway and Off-Broadway productions will be a part of this weekend's showcase at the Corner Playhouse in Columbia! Did your favorite make the cut? Watch! March 14, 2017

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is giving paid parental leave to state executive branch workers.

The Republican announced an executive order Monday to grant up to six weeks paid leave for primary caregivers and three weeks for secondary caregivers to spend time with newborn or adopted children.

The change doesn't apply to employees who work for the Legislature, judiciary or other statewide elected officials.

State policy allows for up to 12 weeks unpaid leave. That could be split if both parents work for the state.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri's House budget leader says lawmakers might not have changed corporate tax law if they'd known what it would actually cost.

Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick told The Associated Press that lawmakers had poor information when the 2015 bill came up for a vote.

The measure was estimated to cost about $15 million annually. Corporate tax revenues dropped more than $155 million the first fiscal year it was implemented, though it's not clear whether that was all from the tax change.

Garrett Giles / KBIA

I put two press passes around my neck after getting ready last Saturday morning. I then walked out my door, got in my car, and traveled to downtown Columbia where the True/False Festival was happening. Well, that was after I stopped at the Chick-fil-a off of Stadium Blvd. to get breakfast.

KBIA

Columbia City Council are seeking a third round of funding from the Missouri Highway and Transportation Commission (MHTC) for the GetAbout project.

The GetAbout project is a collaborative effort between city council’s Public Works and Parks and Recreations departments since 2006. The project has improved Columbia’s non-motorized transportation by adding or improving bike lanes, trails and sidewalks across the city. The project helped extend the Hinkson Creek Trail and providing bike lanes on Providence Road back in 2013. 

Scott Davidson via Flickr

Amber Gann began working as the interim 911 Director on March 1.  Although she is new to the position, Gann has worked at the county sheriff’s department for years. 

She said in her almost 10 years there she has worked in several different positions, including Deputy Director and dispatcher.

She said she is familiar working on the radio as a dispatcher, but now she wants to focus more on the administrative side of things, and building teamwork.    

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri First Lady Sheena Greitens has found a treasure trove in the governor's mansion storage locker.

Greitens says she heard that there might be some children's books left over from past events at the mansion. She hoped to find enough to hand out at an Easter egg event next month.

But when she arrived in the storage locker, Greitens says she was "blown away" to find a mountain of about 20 boxes full of hundreds of children's books from Scholastic.

The first lady said she plans to donate the books, mostly to foster care facilities in Missouri.

Former Jefferson City NAACP Chapter President died last Tuesday.  Nimrod Chapel, Sr. was 76 and died from a recent stroke. 

A longtime civil rights advocate, Chapel sought to protect voter rights for African Americans.  Chapel was the first African American to receive a degree in the Construction Management when he graduated from Oklahoma State University.  The NAACP Lifetime Service Award recipient established NAACP units in prisons and at Lincoln University in Jefferson City. 

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Missouri's House budget leader says lawmakers might not have changed corporate tax law if they'd known what it would actually cost.

Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick told The Associated Press that lawmakers had poor information when the 2015 bill came up for a vote.

The measure was estimated to cost about $15 million annually. Corporate tax revenues dropped more than $155 million the first fiscal year it was implemented, though it's not clear whether that was all from the tax change.

Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin announced plans to expand urgent mental healthcare treatment for former service members with other-than-honorable discharges last week. Currently, service members with other-than-honorable discharges are not eligible for any VA healthcare benefits. These new plans would mean around half a million former service members would be able to get care from the VA during mental health crises.

There are around 482,000 veterans in Missouri, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In Columbia, veterans can access care through the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital and non-profits that provide employment, housing and mental health resources.

Organizers of Postcards for Policy are hoping for a “yuge” number of postcards to put into the mail today.

On Friday night, Café Berlin hosted an event allowing people to express their opinions about government. People were encouraged to be creative and bring their own contributions, as well as decorate the postcards provided on the table. Some of the cards created said “No Walls,” “Hands Off My Medicare” and “Resign.”

“It has to do with the Ides of Trump, as they’re calling it,” Kathleen Neason, the organizer of Postcards for Policy in Columbia, said.

Today Paul Pepper visits with DIANA MOXON, Executive Director of the Columbia Art League, about 'Comestible,' a "delicious" new show featuring 80-90 works of art inspired by everything edible. The official opening is this Friday - watch for details! At [3:55] MAHREE SKALA invites everyone to a 'candidate forum' tomorrow evening that will feature those running for Columbia's school board seats, hospital board of trustees and wards one and five. The League of Women Voters is sponsoring this great opportunity to meet and greet local representatives. March 13, 2017

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri's House budget leader says lawmakers might not have changed corporate tax law if they'd known what it would actually cost.

Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick told The Associated Press that lawmakers had poor information when the 2015 bill came up for a vote.

The measure was estimated to cost about $15 million annually. Corporate tax revenues dropped more than $155 million the first fiscal year it was implemented, though it's not clear whether that was all from the tax change.

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