News

standardized test
albertogp123 / Flickr

 Statewide results for the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) revealed that elementary school students received low scores in science for the third year in a row. Only 42.7 percent of 5th grade students scored proficient or above in the test, down from about 47.5 percent last year.

Communications Specialist for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Nancy Bowles said that these scores indicate the increased importance of science education in Missouri.

Gerry Dincher / Flickr

State and federal regulators say 32 disposal wells in northeastern Oklahoma must shut down because they are too near a newly discovered fault line that produced the state's strongest earthquake on record.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission said Monday that 27 wells under its jurisdiction would cease operations, along with five wells in Osage County, which is covered by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rules.

Adam Procter / Flickr

School is back in session, and this week on Intersection we talk with three MU professors about their work in the classroom and beyond.

Our guests include:

  • Lisa Sattenspiel, an anthropology professor who researches infectious disease.
  • Robert Greene of the Murray Center for Documentary Journalism. His film Kate Plays Christine premiered in early September.
  • Joseph Erb, professor of digital storytelling and animation, who talks about preserving the Cherokee language.


Authors Discuss new Lloyd Gaines Book

Sep 12, 2016
Trevor Hook

  Authors James Endersby and William Horner discussed their new book Lloyd Gaines and the Fight to End Segregation Saturday morning during The Boone County Historical Society’s monthly “Meet the Authors” event.

Chris Campbell, the Executive Director for the Boone County Historical Society, says “Meet the Authors” events are meant to celebrate great writing.

“The goal is to give people a great experience.” Campbell says.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

  At least 200 demonstrators are rallying at the Missouri Capitol to call for a higher minimum wage and expanded health care.

The rally Monday was one of 30 scheduled nationwide as part of the "Moral Monday" movement.

The movement began in 2013 against conservative policies that advocates say hurt the poor and minorities. The Rev. Will Barber, who gained attention when he spoke at the Democratic National Convention, is leading a protest in North Carolina.

Final Veto Showdown for Missouri's Most-Overridden Governor

Sep 12, 2016
jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri lawmakers are attempting to expand Gov. Jay Nixon's already historic status as the state's most overridden governor.

Since Nixon took office in 2009, the Republican-led Legislature has overridden 83 vetoes of bills and budget expenditures by the Democratic governor.

That's nearly four times the combined total of all other governors' overrides dating back to the early 1800s.

The high number of overrides is partly because of Republicans' virtually unchecked control of the Legislature.

New Parking Meters Coming to Columbia

Sep 12, 2016
Travis Meier / KBIA

  Visitors to downtown Columbia will be able to keep their change soon. Downtown Columbia will be adding more parking meters that are payable by smartphone app. The Parkmobile app allows drivers to pay a meter by credit card or PayPal. 

Public Works spokesperson Barry Dalton said the city will make every meter downtown accessible through Parkmobile by the end of this fall. There is no set date.

“Those new meters will allow customers to use coins, the city’s prepaid parking card, or the Parkmobile app,” Dalton said.

Today Paul Pepper visits with MARILYN McLEOD, League of Women Voters, about two programs coming up this month. The first - in honor of Constitution Day - is called, "Will They Count Your Vote?"; the second is the monthly 'Lunch and Learn' at Hy-Vee South in Columbia. You'll see two short films about voting, including "Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot." Watch for details! At [3:43] GLOVER BROWN and TODD SPALDING are here with more about the Lafayette Street and the Historic Foot District Memorial Project. Todd serves at the Director of Parks, Recreation and Forestry in Jefferson City, and has a plan to redevelop the area as a park next spring - find out more! September 12, 2016

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

A carriage company has been ordered to stop giving rides in St. Louis and St. Louis County after allegations that it used unlicensed drivers and worked horses on extremely hot days.

The St. Louis Metropolitan Taxicab Commission, which governs vehicles for hire, ordered Brookdale Farms to end the rides after a hearing last week.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports carriage rides are prohibited when heat and humidity cause a "feels-like" temperature of 100 degrees or more.

University of Missouri

A national accreditation group says the University of Missouri School of Medicine must address several areas of concern within two years to maintain its accreditation.

The report by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education says, among other things, that the number of Missouri medical students who reported experiencing gender discrimination is twice as high as the national average. The committee accredits medical degree programs.

Missouri State Highway Patrol

 A retired sergeant who spoke out after a handcuffed Iowa man drowned is suing three Missouri Highway Patrol officials, saying they conspired against him and forced him to retire early.

The Kansas City Star reports that Randy Henry filed the lawsuit Thursday.

Twenty-year-old Brandon Ellingson was arrested in 2014 on the Lake of the Ozarks on suspicion of boating while intoxicated. While being transported, he tumbled into the water wearing an improperly secured life vest and drowned.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

A state commission has ruled that a former police officer can be disciplined for pointing a semi-automatic rifle at Ferguson, Missouri, protesters more than two years ago.

Raymond D. Albers was a lieutenant for St. Ann police. He was working at a protest 10 days after the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014. Video showed Albers pointing a gun at protesters and swearing at them.

He resigned days later.

Thinking Out Loud: MU Theatre Preview

Sep 9, 2016
Trevor Harris / KBIA

Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Death of a Salesman is the first offering from the MU Department of Theatre in their 2016-2017 season. Department professor Suzanne Burgoyne and chair Heather Carver look ahead with KBIA's Darren Hellwege on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

AP Photo

Thailand is the world's third-largest exporter of seafood, shipping shrimp, tuna and other fish to supermarket chains and pet food companies in the U.S. and Europe.

But a series of investigations by the Associated Press and other news agencies have highlighted a pervasive problem in the Thai fishing industry: the use of slave labor from people tricked or kidnapped into working at sea.

 On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at slavery at sea in Southeast Asia, and what’s being done to fight it. 


Today Paul Pepper welcomes back SEAN SPENCE, Regional Director of the Mid-Missouri Better Business Bureau, who talks about two kinds of popular scams: the 'IRS scam' and the 'grandparent scam.' Have you gotten a call from the IRS lately asking for money? If so, it's 100% fake, and Sean tells us why. He also tells us about what he calls an "insidious" attack on senior citizens, and how to spot it before your loved ones fall for it! September 9, 2016

Marcin Wichary / Flickr

The U.S. Department of Justice has found that federal agents lacked proper guidance and experience when they conducted undercover sting operations in several cities since 2010 that were aimed at disrupting illegal gun sales.

The Justice Department's inspector general's office released a report Thursday examining shortcomings with U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' storefront sting operations in Milwaukee; Pensacola, Florida; St. Louis; Wichita, Kansas; and Boston.

ferguson ruling
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

The city of Ferguson, Missouri, is making progress on reforms, but attorneys for both sides say much work remains to meet the requirements of an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice.

Ferguson reached a settlement with the Justice Department earlier this year aimed at resolving problems in the St. Louis suburb's criminal justice system that came to light during protests following the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer in 2014.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Hillary Clinton is offering an intimate look at her Methodist faith and how it has influenced her life in public service.

At the National Baptist Convention in Kansas City, Clinton recalled her father's nightly prayers, her mother's time as a Sunday School teacher and the youth minister who took her to see the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Clinton said that thanks to her family and church, she "embraced an activist social justice faith."

A Kansas City group has donated $10 million toward the University of Missouri's effort to build a new football practice facility.

The university on Thursday announced the gift from the Kansas City Sports Trust.

A release from the university says details of the new facilities are still in the planning process.

Director of Athletics Jim Sterk says in the news release the gift is an important starting point for fundraising for the football facility.

The American Civil Liberties Union is suing Kansas City Public Schools on behalf of a young child whose hands were cuffed behind his back two years ago when he was a 7-year-old second-grader.

The lawsuit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Kansas City claims the boy was "crying and hollering" after a teacher asked him to change seats on April 30, 2014. The suit says a school resource officer came and led the boy away, at times holding tightly onto the child's arm after he ignored the officer's instructions.

Missouri is appealing a federal court's decision that requires the state to break one of its most-guarded secrets and reveal the name of any supplier of its lethal injection drug.

Calling the matter "a question of exceptional importance," the state on Wednesday asked the full 8th Circuit Court of Appeals to urgently upend a ruling last week by a three-judge panel of that court in a case brought by two death-row inmates in Mississippi.

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander is sending findings from an investigation of a state House race to state and federal prosecutors to determine if charges are warranted.

A report from Kander's office Wednesday also said it "strongly encourages" the St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office to review every absentee ballot cast in a contested Democratic primary for a St. Louis-area House seat.

At issue is incumbent Rep. Penny Hubbard's 90-vote win over political newcomer Bruce Franks.

Today Paul Pepper visits with JAIME FREIDRICHS, Director of the Missouri Women's Business Center. MOWBC is a brand new program of Central Missouri Community Action that aims to relieve some of the stress and unknowns that women (and men) encounter when opening their own business. At [3:27] BECCA PAMPERL invites everyone to the 2016 Out of the Darkness Walk October 9th at Stephens Lake Park in Columbia. Last year, over $18,000 was raised for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention; and like last year, this year's funds will go towards the goal of raising awareness to the over 1,000 suicides per year in Missouri alone (43,000 nationwide). September 8, 2016

Morning Newscast for September 8, 2016

Sep 8, 2016
Darren Seals / Facebook

A 29-year-old man who police say was fatally shot before his body was found in a burning vehicle near St. Louis was a highly visible activist during protests over the 2014 police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

St. Louis County police say Daren Seals' body was found early Tuesday in Riverview near Ferguson. His death is being investigated as a homicide. Authorities spelled his name as Daren, but other records show it as Darren.

Greg Friese / Flickr

A Senate panel has opened a preliminary investigation into why the price of lifesaving EpiPens has skyrocketed.

The top Republican and Democrat on the Senate Homeland's investigations subcommittee said in a statement Wednesday that they began an inquiry into Mylan Pharmaceuticals' pricing and competition practices. Mylan has been sharply criticized for its steep price increases for the emergency allergy treatment EpiPen.

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