News

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

  Republican Gov.-elect Eric Greitens wants former U.S. Attorney Todd Graves to lead the Missouri Republican Party as its chairman.

Greitens announced his support for Graves late Tuesday.

While the governor-elect can endorse a slate of leadership for the state party, it's up to the Republican State Committee to vote on its next chairman. A vote is scheduled for January.

A replacement is needed because current chairman John Hancock said last month that he will step down to return to political consulting.

Lincolnu.edu

Lincoln University in Jefferson City says several faculty members will be out of jobs by the end of the school year.

University president Kevin Rome tells the Jefferson City News-Tribune that the layoffs are a part of program eliminations. It is unclear how many teachers are being laid off.

Lincoln University officials decided in July to decertify the school's history degree and cancel two music degrees as well as a two-year early education degree.

Photo courtesy of the Office of Gov. Jay Nixon

 A new maximum-security psychiatric building in Fulton, Missouri will be named after outgoing Gov. Jay Nixon.

A three-person board composed of Nixon, Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder and Attorney General Chris Koster approved the naming during a Wednesday meeting at the governor's Capitol office.

Nixon abstained from the vote.

Construction of the new facility is underway at Fulton State Hospital, which was built in 1851.

During the meeting, state officials also named a St. Louis state office building on Chouteau Avenue after Michael Keathley, who died in 2008.

Pay Raises Recommended for Missouri Elected Officials

Dec 14, 2016
David Shane / Flickr

 A citizen panel is recommending raises for Missouri elected officials.

The Citizens' Commission on Compensation for Elected Officials this month released a report calling for 8 percent raises in both fiscal years 2018 and 2019 for the governor and other statewide elected officials.

The panel also recommended raises of roughly 2 percent for lawmakers in both fiscal years.

The raises would cost the state about $470,000 over both fiscal years. Incoming Republican Gov.-elect Eric Greitens would get a raise of more than $22,000.

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base. Also, Trump’s on-going role on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice, reading the tea leaves on media cross-ownership and a look at a generation of children growing up on YouTube. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

In this special, hear from eight students at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. They've learned both inside and outside the classroom, so they were challenged in their magazine writing capstone class to take an experience and share it on the radio. With help from their Associate Professor Berkley Hudson, they recount stories about family, roommates and rats. 

Listen to our radio special here: 

  

Sarah Kellogg

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, based in Washington DC, consists of a group of over 100 journalists around the world that collaborate on investigative stories. ICIJ is the organization that launched the investigation of the Panama Papers, which are more than 11 million leaked documents about the shell corporations of Mossack Fonseca. Marina Walker Guevara, ICIJ’s deputy director, visited the University of Missouri this fall. Walker Guevara to talked to KBIA about the Panama Papers and the process ICIJ went through to break this story.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Americans waste a staggering amount of food. Instead of letting it rot and wreck the environment, some entrepreneurs want to put it to work feeding insects, and see the potential to revolutionize how we feed some of the livestock that provide us our meat.

Phil Taylor’s enthusiasm for insects is infectious. The University of Colorado Boulder research ecologist beams as he weaves through a small greenhouse in rural Boulder County, Colorado. A room about the size of a shipping container sits inside.

State Historical Society of Missouri

The attack on Pearl Harbor was 75 years ago last week. With fewer folks alive each year who personally remember the tragedy of December 7, 1941 now seemed like a good time to listen to some memories of and reactions to The Day of Infamy.


Today Paul Pepper welcomes back HEATHER HARLAN, Phoenix Health Programs, to talk about their "free gifts for the community." If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please take advantage of the necessary services they provide! Watch for details. At [4:36] first-time guest HANNAH REEVES invites everyone to the 3rd annual Masters Exhibit at Columbia's Sager | Braudis Gallery. Experience (and maybe own) original works of art from mid-century 'masters' such as Picasso, Bauer and Scarlett just to name a few. Hannah says that "this is such an important exhibit. These works, mostly have not been to Missouri or the midwest." Two weeks left to check it out! December 14, 2016

Via Flickr user Hanbyul

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base.

Lauren Duca, Teen Vogue: “Donald Trump is gaslighting America

Wikimedia Commons

Boeing Co. will move the headquarters for its defense unit from St. Louis to the Washington, D.C., area.

The move announced Tuesday by Chicago-based Boeing affects about a dozen top executives and some support staff. It will not impact the day-to-day operations for defense workers in St. Louis.

A Boeing spokesman told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch the move reflects the company's desire to be closer to those in power in Washington, and is unrelated to recent criticism from President-elect Donald Trump over the potential cost of the Air Force One presidential jet program. 

  

cubicles
Tim Patterson / Flickr

  Jobs are on the rise and unemployment continues to decline in Missouri.

 

The state Department of Economic Development on Tuesday announced seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment grew by 1,900 jobs in November.

 

Jobs again hit a record high, with a total of more than 2.8 million in the state. The state gained about 57,000 jobs in the past year, which is a growth of a little more than 2 percent.

 

The most job growth last month occurred in the accommodation and food services industry.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

  Shareholders of agricultural seed and chemical giant Monsanto agreed to a merger Tuesday, moving the controversial deal one-step closer to fruition.

German drug and chemical maker Bayer plans to pay shareholders $66 billion to take over Missouri-based Monsanto. That breaks down to $128 per share if the merger closes.

7mary3 / FLICKR

This week on Intersection, we continue exploring what community policing looks like in Columbia, and where ideas about community policing come from. We talk with Daniel Isom, a former chief of police and professor of policing and the community at the University of Missouri in St. Louis, and with Clint Sinclair, the Columbia Police Department's LGBT liaison.  We also learn how  Columbia police officers are trained to identify bias when we sit in on an open-to-the-public version of the department's community policing training.

Through our conversations, we learn about the origins of community policing and how it's developing in Columbia. Listen to the full story: 


Missouri Department of Conservation

Many Americans continue the European tradition of the Christmas tree. In Europe, people used spruces and firs to decorate their homes. This week on Discover Nature we look for another Missouri evergreen: the Eastern Red Cedar.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back JENNIFER BEAN, Dietician with the Central Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics! Jennifer recommends that you spend your calories on what only comes around during the holiday season (i.e. Grandma's pie), because "you can have mashed potatoes any day of the year." Watch for more tips! At [5:25] ROSE VOMUND returns with information about Services for Independent Living's in-home services program. Are you in need of a nurse or direct support professional to come to you? If you're Medicaid-approved, SIL can help! December 13, 2016

A former St. Louis police sergeant has been ordered to spend a year and a day in federal prison for stealing more than $80,000 from the organization for black police officers that he once led.

Forty-two-year-old Darren Randal Wilson was sentenced Monday in St. Louis. That's where he pleaded guilty in September to nine counts of wire fraud.

Wilson was the Ethical Society of Police's president in 2013 and 2014, giving him access to bank account funds made up primarily of members' dues.

j.stephenconn / flickr

  A suburban St. Louis school district that includes part of Ferguson, Missouri, will appeal a federal judge's order requiring a new method for electing school board members in an effort to remove racial bias from the process.

The Ferguson-Florissant School District announced Monday that an appeal will be filed this week with the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

  A developer is preserving and incorporating a Native American burial mound into a neighborhood development project.

  The Columbia Missourian reports Mike Tompkins bought property west of Columbia and discovered the 80-foot-long mound on the northeastern side of the property.

Tompkins says the burial was discovered after city officials started questioning what the mound was as he planned the 91-acre subdivision.

Torie Ross / KBIA

A state audit finds that a now-defunct suburban St. Louis municipal court illegally charged fees on dismissed cases and that police were collecting unlawful booking fees at the jail.

Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway released findings Monday of the audit requested by Northwoods residents. That city has dissolved its municipal court and transferred cases to St. Ann under a courts consolidation push in St. Louis County.

Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

  Planned Parenthood officials in Missouri want a federal judge to block abortion regulations so four additional clinics can offer the procedure.

Leaders on Monday requested some regulations be put on hold while a court case over the constitutionality of the laws plays out.

Laura McQuade and Mary Kogut said Planned Parenthood plans to offer drug-induced and surgical abortions in Columbia and Springfield if regulations are temporarily blocked. They said drug-induced abortions also would be offered in Joplin and Kansas City.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media and KBIA

There is a battle going on in the organic industry over hydroponics, the technique of growing plants without soil. The debate gets at the very heart of what it means to be “organic” and may change the organic food available to grocery store shoppers.

To be labeled as organic, fruits and vegetables are required to be grown without genetic modification or synthetic chemicals, and to meet other rules set out by the Agriculture Department. But what about produce that isn’t grown in the dirt?  

Today Paul Pepper visits with JOE POLACCO, author, "Vina, A Brooklyn Memoir." Joe tells us how this tribute to his Italian mother came to be, and what he learned about her after her death. Plus, find out where you can meet Joe in person next Monday! At [5:12] JANE WHITESIDES, Executive Director, Missouri Symphony Society, invites everyone to this year's annual "Symphony of Toys" concert at the Missouri Theatre! With an appearance by Santa Claus, audience caroling, a "performance" by notable Columbians (including our esteemed host) and more, this event is sure to delight the whole family! December 12, 2016

Morning Newscast for December 12, 2016

Dec 12, 2016

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:


David Shane / Flickr

A Missouri lawmaker says President-elect Donald trump's promise to slash corporate income taxes could create momentum to eliminate those taxes completely in the state.

Republican state Sen. Will Kraus is proposing phasing out Missouri's 6.25 percent corporate income tax by 2019. Kraus told The Associated Press that the goal is to attract companies and increase jobs.

Missouri would be one of only three states without a corporate income tax or other business tax. Missouri's flat corporate income tax already is lower than the top rate in most surrounding states.

Pages