News

Missouri House Advances Bill on Hiring Veterans

Apr 2, 2018

The Missouri House is advancing a bill to protect private businesses from lawsuits if they give preference to veterans in hiring or promotion.

The measure would shield businesses that favor veterans, spouses of veterans and spouses of veterans who have died.

Missouri House Advancing Bill on Opioid Crisis

Apr 2, 2018

The Missouri House is advancing a bill aimed at fighting the opioid crisis with drug take-back programs and limits on prescriptions.

The proposal would limit initial painkiller prescriptions to seven-day supplies for acute pain. Cancer and hospice patients would be exempt, and doctors could write longer prescriptions if they deem it necessary.

Stymied by state regulators, a renewable energy company seeking to build one of the nation's longest power lines across a large swath of the Midwest has turned to a prominent politician in an attempt to revive its $2.3 billion project.

Former Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, now working as a private attorney after recently finishing 30 years in public office, is to argue Tuesday to the Missouri Supreme Court that utility regulators he appointed wrongly rejected the power line while relying on an incorrect court ruling written by a judge whom Nixon also appointed.

Rice University

Darren Hellwege talks with Professor John Boles of Rice University about his research and writing on Thomas Jefferson. Boles will be a guest of the University of Missouri's Kinder Institute. 

Rainbow House of Columbia

Darren Hellwege talks with April Barnett of Columbia's Rainbow House about the services they offer and their annual fundraising event the Masquerade Ball 

Creative Commons

The classic concept of bullying is a boy on the playground scaring other kids into giving up their lunch money. But that's far from how much bullying unfolds. Today on Intersection we explore what bullying, and efforts to stop it, look like in Missouri. We hear about revenge porn, online bullying and harassment, and prevention programs at local schools.

Editor’s note: On this episode, we discuss topics including suicide. This may not be suitable for all listeners.   

Get your laughs on at the 30th annual Assistance League of Mid-Missouri and Job Point Comedy Night! DONNA BECKETT and SANDRA FLAKER tell us about that, as well as about ALMM's quarterly cookie sale - it's back, and the order deadline is fast approaching! Plus, JOSH CHITTUM tells us how the "We Always Swing" Jazz Series is planning to celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month. [4:24] March 30, 2018

For many people, the thought of spending your life next to the aquamarine waters of the Caribbean is an envious one.

But for many people in the tiny fishing village of Cajio Beach in western Cuba - it’s something they only want to escape. Life for them is a constant struggle and filled with disappointments. 

Few have hope for a better life in Cuba - and so the only promise for many is to board a raft or small boat in hopes of making the 90 mile journey to the United States alive. This glimpse into life in Communist Cuba 59 years after Fidel Castro’s revolution is depicted in a richly detailed new documentary called “Voices of the Sea.”  

Directed by the British-American filmmaker Kim Hopkins, the film screened in March at the True/False Film Festival in Columbia, Missouri and will air in the fall on PBS as part of its POV strand of documentaries.  

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an in-depth interview with Hopkins about the making of this remarkable film and life in modern Cuba.


Reflect

Mar 29, 2018

Directors Kim Hopkins (VOICES OF THE SEA), Erick Stoll and Chase Whiteside (AMERICA) spent significant time with their subjects, close-knit families in Cuba and Mexico, respectively. Listen in on these three as they consider the many things they have in common during their Field Session at True/False 2018.


Native plant expert NADIA NAVARRETE-TINDALL introduces us to Kentucky Coffeetree, Burr oak acorn flour, Jerusalem artichoke and more! Taste recipes made from these ingredients by signing up for one of Nadia's classes in April at the Career Center in Columbia. March 29, 2018

JOAN STACk invites everyone to visit the exhibit: "Sketches of War: Editorial Cartoons Representing World War I by Daniel Fitzpatrick." Daniel was the editorial cartoonist for the St. Louis Post Dispatch from 1913-1958. These 'sketches' are on display now in The Elizabeth Rozier Gallery in Jefferson City. March 28, 2018

Missouri Department of Conservation

The lonesome calls of Missouri mornings on the prairie – once produced by hundreds of thousands of birds across our state – now hold the haunting story of a species nearly eliminated from our landscape

Each spring, male prairie chickens return to breeding grounds, called leks, to perform unique mating rituals. Each male defends his territory from competing cocks, inflating bright orange air sacs on his neck, and producing distinct “booming” call. 

DR. DAVID NEWMAN applies "golf therapy" to children with autism, ADD and ADHD. He says, "people that have autism, that before were almost unruly, when they get out on the golf course they're not. They're calm; they're relaxed. You can actually talk to them." March 27, 2018

MU grad students SARAH PEACOCK, Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, and DREW MALLINAK, School of Natural Resources, give us the two-minute version of their recent Science on Tap CoMo presentations. Plus, NICK FOSTER looks ahead to the many programs Voluntary Action Center supports during the spring and summer months. [4:47] March 26, 2018

Students Lead Columbia 'March for Our Lives' Rally

Mar 26, 2018
Yixuan Wang / KBIA

In spite of the chilly weather and soggy rain, an estimated 1,000 students and their supporters turned out Saturday to march from the MU Columns to the Boone County Courthouse as a protest to gun violence.

The students joined the global March for Our Lives rally, carrying signs that read, "Will I Survive High School?" and "Will I Be Next?" Among the marchers were elementary school children, teenagers, teachers and parents. 

When the procession reached the courthouse, students and others spoke passionately about safety in their schools and the need to change gun laws.

Afternoon Newscast for March 23, 2018

Mar 23, 2018


Devin Hursey, left, wears a patterned gray sweater, has a light beard and smiles into the camera. Jannis Evans, right, wears a floral-patterned top, large silver earrings and has short, white hair. She also smiles into the camera.
Landon Jones / KBIA

Jannis Evans and Devin Hursey both work in the HIV treatment and prevention field and have served on committees advocating for people with HIV in Missouri and across the country.

They sat down at this month’s Legislative Advocacy Day sponsored by the Missouri HIV Justice Coalition where they both were advocating for changes to Missouri’s HIV criminal laws, and they spoke about some of the reasons HIV impacts communities of color at a higher rate.  

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri attorney general's office has issued 15 subpoenas in an investigation of a veterans charity founded by Gov. Eric Greitens.

Attorney General Josh Hawley told reporters Friday that the office subpoenaed The Mission Continues charity, Greitens' gubernatorial campaign and the Greitens Group.

Hawley says the office also subpoenaed staffers or former staffers at the entities. He wouldn't say specifically who.

Today Paul Pepper visits with BARBARA BUFFALOE, Sustainability Manager at the City of Columbia, about the many planned activities to help us celebrate our planet Earth! Starting tomorrow, turn off any non-essential lights and devices from 8:30-9:30 p.m.; then there's the Show Me Native Yards and Neighborhoods Workshop with Nadia Navarrete-Tindall; plus, the Advancing Renewables in the Midwest Conference is coming up in mid-April. So much to do - watch for details! March 23, 2018

Morning Newscast for March 23, 2018

Mar 23, 2018

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: 


Columbia High Schoolers Plan March For Our Lives to Change Gun Policy

Mar 23, 2018
Laura Miserez / Columbia Missourian

High School students in the Columbia Public School District will be marching Saturday in support of the national March For Our Lives in Washington.

The march is inspired by survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 were killed last month.   

Kevin McCoy

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday approved legislation to crack down on sex trafficking by expanding the ability of prosecutors to go after websites that promote and facilitate it.

The measure, which passed the Senate 97-2, also would give state attorneys general the authority to file civil lawsuits on behalf of victims of sex trafficking. The House approved it last month 388-25, sending it on to President Donald Trump for his expected signature.

St. Louis Public Radio

The ex-husband of the woman who had an affair with Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is seeking an order for protection from the governor.

The motion filed Thursday does not allege any threats from Greitens, but says that the man feels intimidated in part because the governor is a retired Navy SEAL officer.

via Wikimedia Commons

 Around the world, rates of teen pregnancy have been dropping for decades.

But in Latin America, rates of teenage motherhood remain stubbornly high. Today they’re about 36 percent higher than the global average.

One country where the problem is particularly acute is Venezuela - where teenagers account for nearly one in four births.
Venezuela's economic crisis has had a big effect on its public health system – including efforts to curtail teen pregnancy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at teen pregnancy in Latin America and the particular challenges faced by young Venezuelans.


Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: 


Unbound Book Festival Author to Open New Bookstore

Mar 22, 2018
Torie Ross / KBIA

Local author and Unbound Book Festival founder Alex George says he plans to open up a new bookstore on Ninth Street in downtown Columbia late this summer.

George wants his shop to contribute to the literary community in Columbia.

 

“I’m a firm believer that bookstores are a force of good in society,” George said. “They provide a place for people to meet and to exchange ideas and talk.”

MU Health Care Plans to Increase Its Range of Services in Mid-Missouri

Mar 22, 2018

Plans for a more connected Missouri health care system and two new local clinics were topics of discussion at a Board of Curators meeting Wednesday.

MU Health Care CEO Jonathan Curtright and UM System President Mun Choi presented plans in front of the MU Health Affairs Committee on ways to increase connections between central Missouri medical centers, provide more at-home care for residents and build a more “streamlined” MU Health Care structure of governance, as Choi described it.'

“We must think more broadly than we historically have,” Curtright said.

City to Conduct Smoke Tests of Sewers Downtown, on MU Campus

Mar 22, 2018

If you see white smoke rising from drains or buildings next week, don't be alarmed. It's likely to be part of a series of tests the City of Columbia Sewer Utility is conducting to identify areas where stormwater is getting into the sanitary sewers.

Rejoice

Mar 22, 2018

Over years of editing, both Leilah Weinraub (SHAKEDOWN) and RaMell Ross (HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING) found themselves migrating away from conventional cinematic languages. In a conversation during True/False 2018 they discussed how they are both seeking to reshape documentary grammar and expand the way films portray black life.


Today Paul Pepper welcomes back local folk musicians CATHY BARTON and DAVE PARA! They perform Sydney Carter's "Julian of Norwich" on autoharp and guitar at [4:13]. Plus, get details on the 27th annual Big Muddy Folk Festival, happening April 6-7 in Boonville! March 22, 2018

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