The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Tattoo Of Buddha Gets British Tourist Thrown Out Of Sri Lanka

British tourist Naomi Coleman displays the tattoo that has gotten her deported from Sri Lanka.
Lakruwan Wanniarachchi AFP/Getty Images

The island nation of Sri Lanka has ordered the deportation of a British tourist for arriving in the country sporting a Buddha tattooed on her arm. Authorities say the ink shows disrespect for religious feelings in the majority-Buddhist nation.

Naomi Coleman, 37, says she got through immigration at the airport near the capital, Colombo, without incident, despite wearing a short-sleeved shirt that exposed the tattoo of a Buddha seated on a bed of lotus flowers.

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Law
11:34 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Rules On Race-Based College Admissions

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The Supreme Court this morning, upheld a ban on using racial preferences in admissions to the public universities of Michigan. The ban was enacted by referendum as an amendment to the state constitution in 2006 and struck down by a lower court. Today, the justices voted 6-to-2 to say the federal courts could not do that and the ban had to stand.

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Tue April 22, 2014

'Stop Supporting Men Hiding Behind Masks,' Biden Tells Russia

Vice President Biden and Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk spoke with reporters Tuesday in Kiev.
Sergey Dolzhenko EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:28 pm

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Louisiana Lawmaker Pulls Bill To Make Bible State's Official Book

A parishioner holds the Holy Bible during a service. A Louisiana bill that would have made the Bible the state's official book has been withdrawn.
Kevin Rivoli The Post-Standard /Landov

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 12:12 pm

The sponsor of a bill to make the Holy Bible the official book of Louisiana has withdrawn the measure ahead of a full vote in the state House of Representatives, saying the proposal has become a distraction.

As we reported last week, a mix of Republicans and Democrats had moved the largely symbolic bill, sponsored by Rep. Thomas Carmody of Shreveport, out of committee on an 8-5 vote.

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Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning.

Kamenetz is the author of several books about the future of education. Generation Debt (Riverhead, 2006), dealt with youth economics and politics; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education (Chelsea Green, 2010), investigated innovations to address the crises in cost, access, and quality in higher education. Her forthcoming book, The Test (PublicAffairs, 2015), is about the past, present and future of testing in American schools.

Shots - Health News
10:11 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Change Your Income, Change Your Health Insurance Plan

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:46 am

People who qualified for subsidies under the Affordable Care Act aren't necessarily locked into the plan they chose. And that can be good news for people whose income fluctuates during the year. Here's our response to the latest reader questions on coverage through the health exchanges.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 12:37 pm

America may have a shot at rejoining the world's most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation.

The Indianapolis-based foundation's annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Ban On Affirmative Action

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette speaks to reporters after arguing the case before the U.S. Supreme Court in October. He's with XIV Foundation CEO Jennifer Gratz, who was a plaintiff in a lawsuit against the University of Michigan's affirmative action policy.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 11:54 am

The Supreme Court has ruled that a Michigan ballot initiative to ban racial preferences in college admissions is constitutional, overturning a lower court decision.

In a 6-2 decision Tuesday, the justices said the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals was wrong to set aside the voter-approved ban as discriminatory.

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Crime
9:06 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Missouri continues to prepare for Rousan execution

Credit California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

Efforts to spare the life of a condemned Missouri man hinge on an argument that has so far held little sway over the courts.

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