Middle East
11:39 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Refugees Creating 'Instant Cities' Across Syrian Borders

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Passover is in full swing and Easter is just days away. And Pati Jinich joins us. She'll tell you how to put a Mexican touch on your holiday feast. But first we turn to Syria. Reports out of the Middle East say rebels have captured a key strategic town near the Jordanian border, but while the fighting continues into its third year, more and more Syrians are trying to flee the country.

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The Two-Way
11:28 am
Fri March 29, 2013

In Court, Former Pakistan President Faces A Flying Shoe

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf (center) arrives in court in Karachi on Friday. An angry lawyer threw a shoe at Musharraf, who was not hit. He faces legal charges following his return to the country after four years in self-imposed exile, police said.
Fareed Khan AP

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 12:09 pm

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf suffered only a blow to his dignity when a lawyer hurled a shoe at him Friday as he entered the High Court in the southern city of Karachi.

The shoe missed its target but made its point. Many in Pakistan's legal fraternity still harbor anger toward the former president for a number of actions he took against the judiciary during his military rule from 1999 to 2008.

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Commute From Earth To Space Station Just Got Shorter

U.S. astronaut Chris Cassidy gestures before Thursday's launch of the Soyuz from the Russian-leased Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Natalia Kolesnikova AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 1:09 pm

Three astronauts have arrived at the International Space Station after being the first to try out a new "express" route that slashes their launch-to-docking commute from two days to just six hours.

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The Two-Way
11:02 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Oklahoma Dentist May Have Exposed Thousands To Disease

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 2:10 pm

Oklahoma's health department is contacting some 7,000 patients of Tulsa-area dentist Dr. W. Scott Harrington to warn them they may have been exposed to "blood-borne viruses."

Officials are urging former patients to get screened for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV after an investigation of Harrington's office found rusty instruments in use and evidence of unsanitary practices. The dentist had clinics in Tulsa and Owasso.

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Shots - Health News
10:55 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Sand From Fracking Could Pose Lung Disease Risk To Workers

A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 12:50 pm

When workplace safety expert Eric Esswein got a chance to see fracking in action not too long ago, what he noticed was all the dust.

It was coming off big machines used to haul around huge loads of sand. The sand is a critical part of the hydraulic fracturing method of oil and gas extraction. After workers drill down into rock, they create fractures in that rock by pumping in a mixture of water, chemicals and sand. The sand keeps the cracks propped open so that oil and gas are released.

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The Two-Way
10:38 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Zombies Can Get Away With Murder

So sue me! (A "zombie" who came to protest the government in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in February.)
Jure Makovec AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 12:52 pm

Being one of the living dead would be a big advantage if you're charged with murder.

And you could probably trash your neighbor's property and not be successfully sued.

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Arts and Culture
10:17 am
Fri March 29, 2013

'Talk Of The Nation' To End 21-Year Run In June

(via NPR/Antony Nagelmann 2001)

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 2:49 pm

The afternoon call-in show "Talk of the Nation" will end its 21-year run on NPR June 30.

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Media
9:50 am
Fri March 29, 2013

NPR To Drop Call-In Show 'Talk Of The Nation'

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 10:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. This morning we have news about our own network, word that TALK OF THE NATION, the daily call-in show broadcast by NPR for the last 21 years, will go off the air this summer. TALK OF THE NATION will be replaced by an expanded version of the news magazine HERE AND NOW. That's currently produced by member station WBUR in Boston, which will continue to produce it in partnership with NPR.

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Agriculture
9:48 am
Fri March 29, 2013

There's a burning problem at the Bridgeton Landfill - it stinks, but is it unsafe?

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 7:29 am

Things have been heating up at the Bridgeton Landfill, a few miles west of the St. Louis airport.

Whether you call it an underground fire, a smoldering event, or just a chemical reaction, it’s causing temperatures inside the landfill to reach well over 200 degrees.

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Politics
9:19 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Columbia voters to decide on "blight" prop and the city's use of eminent domain

Columbia Sixth Ward Councilmember Barbara Hoppe supports Proposition One, a measure on the April 2nd ballot. The measure would affect the city's use of eminent domain.
KBIA

If approved, Proposition One would limit the city of Columbia’s ability to designate property as blighted for the purposes of acquiring it with eminent domain. It would also prevent eminent domain from being used to transfer the ownership of property from one private owner to another. Sixth Ward Councilmember Barbara Hoppe proposed the bill. She says that it will help sooth concerns about how the blight designation and eminent domain are used. “Well I think there’s just a general public concern about the overuse and misuse of eminent domaink," she says, "particularly after the Kelo vs.

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