Monkey See
9:55 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Do Not Pass Go, Do Not Get Severance: Interview With An Iron

The Monopoly iron token that was replaced by the new cat token.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:07 pm

Wednesday, Hasbro announced that it was welcoming a new member of the Monopoly-token family. And because it asked the Internet, it wound up with a cat. (For whatever reason, the Internet was not offered Gotye or a bacon cupcake.)

Read more
Business
9:51 am
Wed February 6, 2013

In Cost-Saving Move, Post Office Cuts Saturday Delivery

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with an ending.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The U.S. Postal Service has just announced the end of first class mail deliveries on Saturday. It is part of an effort to slow enormous financial losses. And NPR's Yuki Noguchi has come into the studio to tell us what all this means for customers and the Postal Service. And Yuki, so when will my Saturday deliveries stop?

Read more
Politics
9:45 am
Wed February 6, 2013

States propose limiting use of drones by police

Lawmakers in at least 11 states including Missouri are looking at plans to restrict the use of drones over their skies amid concerns the unmanned aerial vehicles could be exploited to spy on Americans.

The American Civil Liberties Union says state legislators are proposing various restrictions on the new technology.

The Montana Senate looked at two bills Tuesday that hinder the use of drones, most often associated with overseas wars.

Read more
Politics
9:43 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Mo. House panel to take up 'right to work' bill

Legislation from Jefferson City attacks Pres. Obama's contraception mandate.
File KBIA

A Missouri House committee is taking up legislation that would bar union membership or dues as a condition of employment.

The House Workforce Development Committee scheduled a public hearing Wednesday on the bill, which supporters call "right to work."

Approval by the Legislature would put the proposed new law to a statewide vote this November.
Supporters argue the legislation would allow Missouri to be more competitive in the job market. Opponents say it would weaken unions and hinder collective bargaining.
 

Politics
9:40 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Nixon calls on lawmakers to broaden Medicaid coverage

images_of_money flickr

Healthcare reform was on the agenda in Gov. Jay Nixon’s 2013 State of the State address as he called upon lawmakers to broaden Medicaid so more Missourians would have access to healthcare. Nixon’s proposed budget includes an expansion of Missouri’s Medicaid program. Estimates are the plan would add nearly 260,000 lower-income adults to the healthcare program through the use of $908 million in federal funds, money that would be received by opting in to the federal Medicaid expansion.

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:36 am
Wed February 6, 2013

With Elbows, Cortisone Shots May Hurt More Than Help

Thinking a cortisone shot would help? You might want to reconsider.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 12:17 pm

Go to the doctor with an aching elbow, and the prescription may well be a cortisone shot. Ah, relief!

But that short-term gain may make for long-term pain. There's mounting evidence that cortisone shots, long the first response for the painful tendon problem known as tennis elbow, increases the risk of continued problems or relapse one year out.

That may come as a surprise to those who have availed themselves of this seemingly miraculous quick fix.

Read more
Politics
9:24 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Funding sought for Mo. child sex abuse victims

selbstfotografiert Wikimedia Common

Advocates for child sex abuse victims are urging the Missouri Legislature to renew a funding increase for their social services.

At issue is an increase of more than 20 percent in funding for child assessment centers that was included in the 2013 budget. That $500,000 increase brought the total funding for the centers to $2.8 million.
The centers conduct forensic interviews and sexual assault exams on children that can help make a legal case against their perpetrators.

NPR Story
9:20 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Mo. Legislative Black Caucus Opposes Photo Voter I.D. Legislation

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 2:19 pm

The Missouri Legislative Black Caucus is speaking out against legislation in both the House and Senate that would require voters to show photo ID’s at the polls.

In each chamber there are proposed constitutional amendments that would allow for photo ID requirements, along with accompanying bills that would enact the proposed requirements -- HB 48 and HJR 1 in the Missouri House, and SB 27 and SJR 6 in the Missouri SenateState Senator Jamilah Nasheed (D, St. Louis) chairs the caucus.  She and other caucus members say Republicans are trying to suppress the voting rights of minorities, the disabled, the poor and elderly.

Read more
Politics
9:16 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Niedermeyer building honored as it's up for possible demolition

The Niedermeyer building
Ryan Famuliner KBIA file photo

The Niedermeyer apartment building was recognized as one of the six Most Notable Properties in Columbia at a Columbia Historic Preservation Commission gala last night as the building faces possible demolition. St. Louis Developer Fred Hinshaw wants to build a student-housing complex in place of this oldest building in downtown Columbia.

At the gala, Preservation Commission Chairman Brian Treece said that the Niedermeyer building has been a staple in Columbia’s history for more than 170 years.

Read more
Science, Health and Technology
9:06 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Will Missouri Adopt A Prescription Drug Monitoring Program?

acephotos1 dreamstime

Efforts to establish a prescription drug monitoring program in Missouri are making a comeback this year. But there’s a twist: the main opponent of establishing such a program is now sponsoring legislation.

“I think it’s a severe intrusion of our liberty to have the government create a database that is accessible by thousands of people, if not tens of thousands of people, who would then have access to sensitive private information,” said Republican Senator Rob Schaaf, a physician in St. Joseph, Mo.

Read more

Pages