Politics
4:55 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Blunt Addresses Missouri House

Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 3:36 pm

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R) addressed the Missouri House today during a visit to the State Capitol.

He told House members that state and local governments should play a bigger role in solving problems than the federal government.

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Business Beat
4:52 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

GM seeds and a new Columbia housing ordinance

Researchers at Monsanto chart the progression of a corn plant over 10 weeks: seed, immature plant, callus, early shoot, shoots, early rooting and advanced rooting. Monsanto fills growth chambers reflecting diverse climate conditions with myriad seed samples.
Credit Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Coming up we’ll kick off a three-part series from Harvest Public Media on the Science of the Seed. For the introductory report, Amy Mayer explores the origins of gene transformation.

But let’s first start in Columbia where as of February, landlords are required to maintain a list of all tenants. It’s part of a new occupancy limitation disclosure ordinance recently passed by the City Council. KBIA’s Andrew Yost reports that the ordinance deals with several overcrowding issues concerning neighbors.

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The Two-Way
4:46 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Cool Photo: A Black Spot, The Size Of Six Earths, Appears On The Sun

The bottom two black spots on the sun, known as sunspots, appeared quickly over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013.
NASA/SDO/AIA/HMI/Goddard Space Flight Center

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 8:42 pm

Over the course of two days in February, scientists watched something amazing happening on the surface of our sun: A giant black spot grew to over six Earths in diameter.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center released a picture of the sun, which shows the spots in deep black.

NASA explains that it's hard to know the full extent of the spots, because it's on a sphere "not a flat disk." NASA adds:

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Weather
4:35 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Columbia officials prepare for winter storm

Winter (storm) is coming, according to this Accuweather radar taken at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday.
Credit Accuweather.com

Officials in Missouri are making preparations for a winter storm that’s expected to hit Columbia during the morning commute Thursday.

The National Weather Service says the storm, which already has dumped inches of snow and rain out West and across the plains states, is projected to bring at least two to four inches of snow accumulation and up to two tenths of an inch of ice in Columbia and surrounding areas.

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Middle East
4:33 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

A West Bank Story, Told Through Palestinian Eyes

Emad Burnat, a Palestinian who co-directed the Oscar-nominated documentary 5 Broken Cameras, displays the cameras destroyed by Israeli settlers and security forces. The film focuses on a Palestinian village protesting Israel's separation barrier in the West Bank.
Kino Lorbor Inc. AP

Originally published on Sun February 24, 2013 7:49 am

The Academy Award-nominated documentary 5 Broken Cameras tells the story of Bil'in, a modest Palestinian village perilously close to an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.

After the Israeli government began putting up its West Bank separation barrier, Bil'in resident Emad Burnat picked up a video camera, and in 2005 began a multiyear documentary project.

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The Salt
4:15 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Smaller But Better? Organic Tomatoes May Pack More Nutritional Punch

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 1:05 pm

A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE finds that tomatoes grown on organic farms were about 40 percent smaller than conventionally grown tomatoes. The upside? They pack more of a nutritional punch. The researchers found the organic tomatoes had significantly higher levels of vitamin C, sugar and lycopene.

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Agriculture
4:13 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

The seeds of genetic modification

Researchers at Monsanto chart the progression of a corn plant over 10 weeks: seed, immature plant, callus, early shoot, shoots, early rooting and advanced rooting. Monsanto fills growth chambers reflecting diverse climate conditions with myriad seed samples.
Credit Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

The vast majority of the corn and soybeans in United States grow from seeds that have been genetically modified. The technology is barely 30 years old and the controversy surrounding it somewhat younger. But how did it even become possible?

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Health & Wealth Update
4:13 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Is high-speed internet access the key to small towns' survival?

MU Professor Brian Dabson stands in a tattered workshop of the defunct Joe Gilliam Mining Company, which used to mine clay, in Goss, Mo. The town now has zero residents.

Listen to a conversation between KBIA's Lukas Udstuen and MU Professor Brian Dabson about why Dabson believes the Internet is crucial to the future of small towns.

Is high-speed Internet the way to attract more people to live in rural Missouri? One MU professor seems to think so. First – let’s dial back a little bit. In a story that KBIA aired on Feb. 13, our reporter Lukas Udstuen investigated the story of Goss, a rural town in Monroe County, Missouri. Its population? Zero.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

New York Times Plans To Sell 'Boston Globe'

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 5:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

The Grey Lady is shedding more of its assets. This afternoon, The New York Times Company announced that it intends to sell The Boston Globe and other properties it owns in New England.

For more on this, NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins me from our bureau in New York. And, David, what can you tell us? Why this sale, and why now?

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Views of the News
4:03 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Tesla v. NYT, CNN Goes Overboard, "Obama, the Puppet Master," Chinese Hacking

Professor Charles Davis

Media criticism and critique from Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Lee Wilkins and Charles Davis.

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