Global Health
1:28 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Polio's End Depends On Three Tough Countries

Vaccination campaigns have erased polio in almost every country in the world, but the disease persists in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria. Obstacles in each country, including religious extremism, difficult terrain and transient populations, make eradication efforts difficult.

The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

NBA Commissioner David Stern Will Retire In 2014

NBA Commisioner David Stern.
Roberto Serra Getty Images/Iguana Press

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 1:15 pm

David Stern said his 30-year run as the NBA's commissioner will come to an end Feb. 1, 2014.

ESPN reports the NBA Board of Governors tapped Adam Silver, Stern's deputy, as the successor.

ESPN adds:

"Stern, 70, has been the NBA's commissioner since Feb. 1, 1984. Last December, when a new collective bargaining agreement was announced, he predicted it would be the final labor deal before he steps down.

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World
1:09 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

'Elders' Seek Solutions To World's Worst Problems

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 8:49 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Most would describe the Middle East peace process as stuck somewhere between impasse and stalemate and not likely to budge anytime soon. Still, a delegation of respected world leaders is visiting Middle East capitals to see if moral power can effect change. They're members of The Elders, some of the most respected leaders of recent history. They look to restart dialogue on some of the world's most intractable disputes and call attention to violations of human rights.

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Europe
1:01 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Italian Earthquake Experts' Confounding Conviction

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

People around the world asked questions after a court in Italy issued prison sentences for scientists convicted of failure to warn the public of an earthquake. In 2009, a temblor devastated the city of L'Aquila and killed more than 300 people shortly after a group of geologists had met to talk about a series of smaller shocks, but scientists around the world say there is no way to predict an earthquake with any kind of accuracy. Aside from that trial, Italy plays a crucial role in the euro crisis.

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Health
1:01 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

After Meningitis Deaths, A Look At Drug Safety

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 1:26 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Two dozen dead and hundreds sickened from contaminated drugs with probably more to come. The outbreak of fungal meningitis has scared many thousands more who received injections of what may have been tainted steroids from a now-closed facility in Massachusetts, which called itself a compounding pharmacy.

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The Salt
12:51 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Rooibos Tea Gets Its Own Sensory Wheel, Just Like Wine And Coffee

Rooibos tea leaves
Wian Hattingh Wian Hattingh

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 3:32 pm

Little rooibos, the humble red tea buttressing the "decaf" side of the after-dinner menu, must be growing up: First, featured in a Starbucks latte. Now, important enough to need its own gourmet lexicon.

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Shots - Health News
12:50 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Study Results Linking Diet Soda To Cancer Fall Into The 'Gray Zone' Of Science

The co-author of a controversial study on diet soda's link to blood cancers says his results fall into a gray zone between a clear relationship and no relationship at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 6:03 pm

As Allison Aubrey reported on The Salt, a brouhaha has erupted in Cambridge, Ma., over a study published yesterday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Humans
12:21 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark?

Abraham Lincoln, circa 1850. Lincoln was a political non-entity before he was elected. Why is he more widely known to history than the presidents who came immediately before and after him?
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 11:56 am

As part of NPR's coverage of this year's presidential election, All Things Considered asked three science reporters to weigh in on the race. The result is a three-part series on the science of leadership. In Part 1, Alix Spiegel looked at the personalities of American presidents. In Part 2, Jon Hamilton examined leadership in the animal kingdom.

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AM Newscasts
12:12 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Newscast for October 25, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • MU, Missouri S&T partner to research small modular nuclear reactors
  • Price of postage stamps creeps higher
  • Boil water advisory lifted for Jefferson City
The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Unclaimed Jobless Benefits Far Exceed Fraudulent Claims, Study Says

Two people check job listings at a New York State Department of Labor Employment Services office in Brooklyn. (March 2011 file photo.)
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Taxpayer-funded jobless benefits that shouldn't have been paid because of errors or fraudulent claims totaled about $11 billion in 2009, according to a new study published by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

But the total amount of unclaimed benefits was nearly 10 times larger, economists estimate: $108 billion. They estimate that during the 2007-2009 recession, only about half of those eligible for them were collecting the benefits.

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