NPR Story
8:08 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Second Injury Fund Debate Begins In Mo. Senate

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 12:07 am

The Missouri Senate spent more than two hours debating legislation Monday that would keep the state’s ailing Second Injury Fund alive.


The proposal being considered would raise fees that businesses across the state currently pay into the fund while placing restrictions on future claims.  State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (D, University City) said in floor debate that raising the cap on businesses was a good move, but expressed concern that people with pre-existing conditions would be left out.

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NPR Story
8:07 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Nixon And Mo. Senate Leaders Agree On At Least One Thing: No State $ For A New Rams Stadium

(via Flickr/Kevin Ward)

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:16 am

Those hoping to keep the Rams in St. Louis should not count on any help from Democratic Governor Jay Nixon or the Republican-led Missouri Senate.

When asked by reporters Monday about efforts to build a new stadium for the Rams, Governor Nixon said that the state is still paying half the cost of the Edward Jones Dome in downtown St. Louis.

“I don’t have a new stadium in this year’s budget, nor do I have any ongoing discussions on how to do that," Nixon said.

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It's All Politics
8:03 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Lonely And Frustrated: These May Be The Worst Jobs In Politics

Democrats have dominated Rhode Island's Capitol building in Providence for decades. One state Republican says it's an "uphill battle" to sell voters and candidates on the GOP's message.
Myles Dumas iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:56 pm

Politics is filled with thankless jobs.

It's the nature of the business that plenty of people have to work for highly demanding egomaniacs. Among elected officials, few relish having to spend big chunks of their time asking other people for money, one of the essential chores.

There are certain jobs, however, that appear from the outside to be so hopeless that you wonder why anyone agreed to take them on.

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The Two-Way
7:35 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Broader Justification Emerges Of When U.S. Can Kill Americans Who Join Al-Qaida

October 2011: Men stand on the rubble of a building destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in southeastern Yemen. Among those killed was U.S. citizen Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, the son of U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who himself was killed by a drone strike the month before.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:57 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Carrie Johnson talks with Steve Inskeep

American citizens who become leaders in al-Qaida or other terrorist organizations overseas and pose "an imminent threat" to Americans may be killed with drone strikes even when there's no evidence that they have specific plans to attack Americans or U.S. interests, according to a Justice Department memo that surfaced Monday.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast Desk that:

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Education
7:23 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Ex-Army leader facing MU protests heads to campus

The retired Army psychologist whose job candidacy is drawing protests at the University of Missouri is scheduled for a public interview on the Columbia campus.

Former Col. Larry James is dean of professional psychology at Wright State University in Ohio. He's one of two finalists for a top administrative job in the university's College of Education.

The interview was scheduled for 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Reynolds Alumni Center.

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Around the Nation
6:53 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Tuba Players Take Valentine's Day Requests

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 12:47 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montage. As one considers the many ways of wooing a beloved on Valentine's Day, the ungainly tuba and its deep bass sound are not the most obviously romantic. Still, a dozen tuba players at the University of Memphis in cute red vests and bow ties are offering a tuba serenade that will at least bring smiles. Their fee includes chocolates, a card, and two classic tunes like "My Girl" and "My Guy."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

(humming)

Asia
6:43 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Osama Bin Laden's Hideout City Plans Makeover

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 12:47 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Abbottabad, Pakistan became world famous in 2011. Osama bin Laden was killed at his hiding place there. Now, the city plans an image makeover. It plans a family-friendly amusement park. The Hazara Heritage Park and Amusement City will include restaurants, mini golf, a butterfly zoo and a lake. A lawmaker tells the Guardian newspapers the park should reassure the world the city is not full of militants and is safe.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:41 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Dramatic End To Alabama Hostage Standoff Took Careful Planning

Law enforcement officials, including some from the FBI, near the scene of the hostage situation in Midland City, Ala., on Friday.
Philip Sears Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:29 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Dan Carsen reports

(We updated the top of this post with new material at 9:50 a.m. ET.)

As more becomes known about how authorities on Monday rescued an almost-6-year-old boy named Ethan from his nearly week-long captivity in an Alabama bunker with a gunman, some fascinating details are emerging.

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Book News: Mary Ingalls May Not Have Gone Blind From Scarlet Fever

Mary Ingalls, the sister of Laura Ingalls Wilder, went blind from illness at age 14.
Wikimedia

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:30 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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