Shots - Health Blog
2:47 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Infection Risk Prompts New York City To Regulate Ritual Circumcision

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 4:25 pm

There's no ready euphemism for this, so be warned.

The New York City Board of Health voted unanimously today in favor of a new regulation that would require parents of young boys who undergo ritual circumcisions involving "direct oral suction" to sign a consent form first.

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Ben Bernanke: Fed Is Looking For 'Sustained Improvement' Of Economy

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks during a news conference in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 2:55 pm

Federal Reserve Chief Ben Bernanke said the new monetary policy announced today is aimed at getting the U.S. economy moving for good.

After a meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee, the Fed announced that it would spend $40 billion a month on mortgage-backed securities in an effort to stimulate the economy and drive the the unemployment rate down.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Monkey, New To Science, Found In Central Africa

Researchers have identified a new species of African monkey, locally known as the lesula.
Maurice Emetshu, Noel Rowe PLOS ONE/AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 10:19 pm

It would seem difficult to overlook something as large as a new species of monkey, but scientists had no idea about the lesula until just a few years ago when conservation biologist John Hart discovered a specimen being kept as a pet in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In retrospect, the monkey's striking, almost humanlike face should have made it hard to miss, and Hart, who spoke with All Things Considered host Melissa Block, is the first to admit that this new monkey was apparently not such a mystery to the Congolese themselves.

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Planet Money
2:04 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

The Fed Goes Big

Any questions?
Jim Watson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 5:06 pm

What people think is going to happen to the economy has a huge influence over what actually happens. If you can change peoples' expectations, you can change the world.

The Federal Reserve knows this. And, as Robert Smith pointed out this morning, Ben Bernanke and the Fed have been using the power of expectations more and more in recent years.

This afternoon, the Fed took another huge step in this direction.

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Sapna is junior journalism and international studies dual major originally from New York City. Now settled in St. Louis, she made her way to the University of Missouri in 2010 and began interning for KBIA that summer. Since then, she has actively gotten involved on the Mizzou campus with activities such as Mock Trial, Global Communications, United Ambassadors, and her own dance crew Kaot!x. Her most recent venture on campus has been to become the Multimedia Chair for the campus organization Dance Marathon. Hoping to end up in the upper management sector of a broadcast news network, Sapna is currently at KBIA as a student newscaster. You can hear her newscasts Thursday evenings between 4 p.m.- 6 p.m. on KBIA.  

NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

How 'Geography' Informs The Fate Of The World

In The Revenge of Geography, Robert Kaplan examines how borders, population and resources should inform our understanding of conflict zones.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:25 am

To understand many of the worlds triumphs, tragedies and conflicts, according to geopolitical analyst Robert Kaplan, look no further than a map.

In his book The Revenge of Geography, Kaplan argues that geography is not just important to understanding world affairs — it's central to understanding where we've been and where we're going.

Kaplan uses this framework to look ahead and speculate about how geography will inform the future development and relations of countries like the United States, China and Iran.

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Arts and Culture
1:53 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Columbia ranked among 100 best communities for young people

Kids play on a playground. The Buddy Pack program sends kids in 32 Missouri counties home with a backpack of nutritious food each weekend, but the program is facing the challenges of rising food and fuel costs.
File photo KBIA

Columbia has been named one of the “100 best communities for young people” by a national organization.

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Education
1:39 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

What's At Stake For U.S. Teachers

Chicago Teachers Union members picket the CPS headquarters in Chicago on Thursday, the fourth day of their strike.
John Gress Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 3:46 pm

The intractable issues that led to the teachers' strike in Chicago are being argued about in states and school districts across the country.

The past decade has been a time of enormous ferment in education policy, with numerous new ideas and approaches being promoted by everyone from conservative think tanks to the well-heeled Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Obama administration officials.

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Agriculture
1:29 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Help us map out the drought in the Midwest

The nation’s worst drought in decades moved Harvest Public Media to look at how the drought is affecting livestock producers just starting out in the business.
Map by Abbie Fentress Swanson (Harvest Public Media). Data submitted by farmers and livestock producers through the Public Insight Network.

Parts of the Midwest got a reprieve from the drought this week, according to the latest US Drought Monitor report released on Thursday. The report found that last weekend’s cold front brought up to five inches of rain to southeastern Missouri, eastern Illinois and central Indiana.

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Welcome To The New Middle East

Security guards were deployed outside the graffiti-covered walls of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt, which came under attack Tuesday.
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 2:56 pm

The three attacks on U.S. diplomatic missions this week have a common theme: all took place in countries where autocratic rulers were ousted last year and where new governments are still struggling to keep order.

Last year, many Americans were cheering on Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt, Libya and Yemen. Now the U.S. is the focus of violent anger over an anti-Islamic film produced in this country.

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