The Two-Way
3:25 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Malcolm Browne, Journalist Who Took The 'Burning Monk' Photo, Dies

Journalist Malcome Browne took this iconic photo of the self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc in Saigon in 1963. The monk committed suicide to protest what he called government persecution of Buddhists. Browne, who worked for the AP and later The New York Times, died Monday at age 81.
Malcom Browne AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:36 pm

Malcolm Browne was a first-rate reporter who spent decades at The New York Times, covered wars around the world and won the Pulitzer Prize for his writing about the early days of the Vietnam war.

And yet he will forever be remembered for one famous picture, the 1963 photo of a Buddhist monk who calmly set himself on fire on the streets of Saigon to protest against the South Vietnamese government, which was being supported by the U.S.

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Colombian President Says 'Exploratory Talks' Held With FARC Rebels

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos delivering a speech to the nation at Narino Palace in Bogota.
Cesar Carrion AFP/Getty Images

The president of Colombia admitted today that his government and the country's biggest rebel group have engaged in "exploratory talks." The public admission could set the stage for peace talks to end one of the world's longest armed conflicts.

From Bogota, NPR's Juan Forero filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"President Juan Manuel Santos, in a brief televised address, said talks had taken place with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

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Sponsored Programming
2:36 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Missouri Medical Focus, August 28, 2012

Aaron Gray, M.D., a sports medicine specialist in the Department of Family Medicine and Orthopaedics at University of Missouri Health Care, discusses concussion and athletes.

Participation Nation
2:34 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Home Away From Home In Bismarck, N.D.

Tracy's Sanctuary House
Courtesy of TSH

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:00 pm

In August 2004, Tracy Rittel was in a fatal car accident near Fargo. While Tracy battled for her life, her family had trouble finding a place to stay near the hospital.

From that experience, the Rittels created Tracy's Sanctuary House in Bismarck for families who find themselves in a similar situation. Since 2005, some 1,500 families have used the home.

A dozen volunteers "put their hearts and souls into making sure the house is kept up," says Tracy's daughter Kelsey Zottnick.

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Politics
1:27 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Memorable Moments From Political Conventions Past

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Despite some interference as what is now Hurricane Isaac brush past, Republicans meet this week in Tampa for their national convention, Democrats will follow next week in Charlotte. Some advice to expect little more than carefully scripted political ads. But Political Junkie Ken Rudin argues the conventions have provided some of the great moments of American political history in the past and hopes to see a little bit more over the next couple of weeks.

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Education
1:12 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Should Anything Be Done To Integrate Schools?

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 1:25 pm

Integration efforts, from busing children out of district to opening charter schools, have proven controversial. David Karp, author of Kids First and Sheryll Cashin, author of The Failures of Integration discuss why some schools are segregated and what, if anything, should be done about it.

Opinion
1:12 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Op-Ed: Iran's Foreign Policy Driven By Identity

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 1:21 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
1:12 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Preparing For Isaac While Remembering Katrina

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 3:27 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Isaac rose to hurricane strength this afternoon and should make landfall on the Gulf Coast sometime this evening. It's nowhere near as powerful as Katrina, but the storm will test systems erected since Katrina, both physical barriers like flood gates and seawalls, and administrative and political changes.

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It's All Politics
1:09 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

As It Happened: GOP Kicks Off Its Convention; Makes Its Case To The Nation

Texas delegates cheer as Romney is formally nominated as the Republican Party's presidential candidate.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 12:23 am

  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 1
  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 2
  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 3

With a program designed both to tell the American people more about Mitt Romney and to make the case that Republicans' ideas for solving the nation's problems are better than Democrats', the 2012 GOP National Convention got going today and Romney officially became the party's presidential nominee.

Delegates also officially made Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin the party's vice presidential nominee.

We live blogged through the afternoon and evening. Scroll down and read "up" if you want to see how the story developed.

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Education
1:08 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

University of Missouri Press will remain open

Adam Procter Flickr

Updated 8/29/12 3:00 p.m.

The University of Missouri says it will keep its academic publishing business open and drop plans for a new reimagined publishing operation.

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