Business Beat
6:27 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

New app aims to help connect Columbia Transit, riders

A screenshot from Columbia Transit, a new iPhone app for the Columbia bus system.
Dave Oster Rockupied

This week: an app may help the Columbia Transit system deal with an unengaged ridership. Plus, Harvest Public Media looks at the lasting impact of the Homestead Act.

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Business
6:21 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Soon you can app your route on Columbia Transit

A screenshot from Columbia Transit, a new iPhone app for the Columbia bus system
Dave Oster Rockupied

Big budget deficits and low ridership keep the Columbia Transit system searching for new ways to boost support.  One unusual place they’re looking is the League of Innovators, a group of tech-oriented entrepreneurs.

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The Two-Way
5:59 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

From Our Readers: A Tale of Two Cities

In San Bernardino, Calif. the city government is suddenly seeking bankruptcy, while in Scranton, Pa. city workers have seen their salaries reduced to minimum wage. One of our readers disparages San Bernardino's actions while another advocates bankruptcy for Scranton.

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Agriculture
5:53 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

The lasting heritage of the Homestead Act

Kendall Hodgson, left, and Ed Hodgson, first cousins, in front of the Hodgson homestead near Little River, Kan.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

LITTLE RIVER, Kan. – Before this town was here, before the railroads were here, before a post office was here, the Hodgsons were here.

In 1871, Hannah and Henry Clay Hodgson moved into a one-room dugout on the banks of the Little Arkansas, their view an Indian camp on the other side of the river. They arrived in central Kansas in November, in the midst of a blizzard, and it took them three days from the train stop in Salina to get the 60 miles south to this outpost.

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The Two-Way
5:49 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Syria's Ambassador To Iraq Says He Has Joined The Revolution

Marking him the most senior diplomat to defect from the Bashar Assad regime, Syria's ambassador to Iraq said he has joined the revolution.

Reuters reports that Nawaf Fares posted a video on Facebook announcing his resignation.

"I declare that I have joined, from this moment, the ranks of the revolution of the Syrian people," Fares said according to Reuters.

The AP, which reported the defection earlier quoting the opposition, says this is the second prominent Syrian to defect in less than a week. The AP adds:

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Science, Health and Technology
5:39 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

New research takes step toward catching Alzheimer's early

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:10 pm

A new study led by Washington University confirms that the brains of people with a very rare, early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease begin to change long before they first show signs of dementia.

The research brings us a step closer to early diagnosis of the more common type Alzheimer's that produces symptoms after age 60.

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Politics
5:22 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Congress votes to repeal 'Obamacare,' again

Republican Vicky Hartzler, who represents part of mid-Missouri, was among the 239 Republicans voting yes to repeal "Obamacare."

The Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives voted today to repeal the federal health care law. The House has voted more than 30 times to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act. Every Republican in Congress voted for the repeal, including mid-Missouri's two representatives.

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The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

VIDEO: When A Shark Steals Your Catch

A shark eats a fish.
YouTube

We dare say that fishing is rarely the most exciting of spectator sports. But a video that is just now going viral makes fishing look like a Hollywood film.

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Politics
4:53 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Arizona Immigration Activists Mobilize Latino Vote

Maxima Guerrero and Daniel Rodriguez canvass for votes in Phoenix. Rodriguez moved to the U.S. with his mother when he was a child, and is undocumented. "The best thing I can do now," he says, "is organize those that can [vote], and make them vote for me."
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:21 pm

For years, Maricopa County, Ariz., has been ground zero in the debate over immigration.

On one hand, the massive county, which includes the state capital of Phoenix, has a growing Latino population. On the other, it's home to publicity savvy Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who has made his name by strictly enforcing, some say overstepping, immigration laws.

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