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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET

In the image, a little girl wails in uncomprehending sadness and anxiety.

Her face flushed nearly as pink as her shirt and shoes, she stares up at her mother and a U.S. official, both too tall to be seen. The 2-year-old Honduran child's panic is so palpable, it's difficult for a viewer not to feel it, too.

Segment 1: Former Kansas state senator Jim Barnett is throwing his hat back in the political arena.

In 2006, Jim Barnett wanted to be governor of Kansas, but lost the job to Kathleen Sebelius. Now, he's campaigning again for the highest office in the state, this time with a new running mate. Today, we learned how he feels about school finacing, medical marijuana legalization and found out why he picked his wife to be his running mate.

The total number of people apprehended for illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has been steadily falling for almost two decades. It's a long-term trend that sociologists, economists and federal officials have been tracking for years.

Preliminary data from the community health agency NCADA show the number of opioid-related deaths in the St. Louis area rose again last year, as they have since 2007.

Nearly 760 people died due to opioids in 2017, a 5 percent increase from 2016. That was a relative improvement from the dramatic spike between 2015 and 2016, when deaths jumped from 517 to 712, or a 38 percent increase. The total includes deaths from things like driving under the influence of opioids as well as overdose deaths.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Kansas received a passing grade for its highways earlier this week when the state’s chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers released its latest “infrastructure report card.” However, the engineers also warned that sweeping cuts to Kansas Department of Transportation funding are still causing roadways to suffer.

The fear of family separation is not new for many immigrants already living in the U.S. In fact, that fear, heightened in recent weeks, has been forcing a tough decision for some families. Advocates say a growing number of American children are dropping out of Medicaid and other government programs because their parents are undocumented.

Marlene is an undocumented resident of Texas and has two children who are U.S. citizens. (NPR is not using Marlene's last name because of her immigration status.) One of her kids has some disabilities.

It's the summer driving season, when millions of Americans take road trips to the beach, big cities, national parks and beyond.

And what goes along with an increase in road trips? A hike in gas prices.

Indeed, historically summer is the time of year gas prices go up because more people are on the road, increasing demand. Oil refineries also introduce special fuel blends during the summer, which emit fewer emissions than winter blends but are more expensive to produce.

Despite the cloudy skies that have been looming over Senegal's seaside capital of Dakar the past few days, there is plenty of sunshine in the streets.

The country's national colors, yellow, green and red, can be spotted all over the city as part of growing enthusiasm over the national team's World Cup hopes. The excitement is building as the Lions of Teranga head into their second World Cup match this weekend after their 2-1 win over Poland in Moscow on Tuesday.

Animated superhero sequel "Incredibles 2" has stormed box offices, raking in the highest-grossing opening weekend of all time for an animated film. But if you're not in the mood for a theater packed with kids (and young adults trying to reconnect to their childhood), Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics assure us there are still plenty of things to see on area screens this weekend.

Steve Walker

"American Animals," R

Copaken Brooks is proposing a 14-story apartment tower on the southwest corner of 18th and Walnut, a striking addition to the skyline that would replace a crumbling Crossroads parking lot with 132 residences.

The $40- to $50 million project would be the second residential tower developed by the firm in the Crossroads Arts District. The other is the 12-story ARTerra project going up at 2100 Wyandotte.

It’s also a half-block north of the firm’s Corrigan Station office development at 19th and Walnut.

It’s been another busy week on social media, with users sharing photos of protests as migrant parents waited to be reunited with their children after being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. First lady Melania Trump also caused a firestorm over a jacket she wore to visit a children’s shelter in Texas. And New Zealand’s Prime Minister gave birth to a baby girl — and Twitter is celebrating.

With Anthony Brooks

How can classic rock survive when its stars are aging and dying?

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

Springfield Ballet presents its 7th annual Young Choreographers Showcase Thursday, June 28 at 6:30 PM in the Springfield Art Museum auditorium. This student-produced production includes original ballet, modern and jazz choreography as well as improvised dance inspired by works at Springfield Art Museum. 

Updated at 6 p.m. with additional details.

A Kansas City, Kansas, man who’s “well known” to police and already accused of several crimes — including first-degree murder — is charged with two counts of capital murder in the fatal shootings of two Wyandotte County sheriff’s deputies.

More than a decade and a half after a weeks-long sniper rampage paralyzed the region around Washington, D.C., one of its two perpetrators is likely to get new sentencing hearings. An appeals court in Virginia confirmed Thursday that several of Lee Boyd Malvo's life sentences without parole must be vacated.

St. Louis will host two Pride festivals this weekend as part of a yearly celebration of LGBTQ+ culture and history.

Pride traces its roots back to the 1969 Stonewall Riots, when police raided a gay club in New York City, sparking widespread protests.  As in past years, two Pride celebrations will take place in St. Louis; a large, two-day event downtown and a community-driven festival in Tower Grove Park. 

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Wes Jackson (R)

Jun 22, 2018

The Land Institute's Wes Jackson has spent decades pushing for a radical return to a pre-industrial prairie ecology, going back to how we sustained ourselves before the advent of modern agriculture. But his story begins on a farm, where his waste-not-want-not values were born. "I was raised on the back of a hoe-handle," he says. Originally broadcast in April, 2016.

Smart speaker owners can enjoy hands-free listening to St. Louis Public Radio in more ways now than ever.

On an Amazon Alexa Device:

Simply say, “Alexa, play NPR,” to listen live to our main channel, KWMU-1.

Additionally, we offer a flash briefing that allows you to listen to our most recent regional newscast by asking, “Alexa, what’s in the news?” 

Learn more about listening with Alexa.

Since 2013, Actors Theatre of Missouri has presented the works of William Shakespeare at the Springfield Art Museum with their "Shakespeare at the Columns" series at the Art Museum's outdoor amphitheatre--weather permitting, of course. Their Shakespeare plays are free and open to the public. Since their first production of "Romeo and Juliet," over 2,500 audience members have seen Shakespeare's works brought to life by Actors Theatre's actors, designers, and technicians.

This story was updated to include the comments of Kansas Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley.

Two Kansas lawmakers are asking for more clarity on the legal status of and facilities for unaccompanied children detained in Kansas after attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

Brothers Jack and Tony Erker did not want to go into the family optical business.

They spent years pursuing other careers to take them far from the shop at Sixth and Olive streets in downtown St. Louis, where it all started in 1879. But it’s hard to resist five generations of history, not to mention the entrepreneurial DNA embedded in their genes.

This spring Jack and Tony opened Copper Hinge, a brick-and-mortar optical shop in the Delmar Loop.    The brothers envisioned a new way to sell eyeglasses, one that’s not available online or in other stores.

The Great Wall of China. A walk on the moon. Genome sequencing. How did we humans, who share almost all of our DNA with chimpanzees, end up doing all that, while they ended up pretty much where they started?

Some scientists will tell you it was language, or tools, or brainpower.

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