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Researchers are studying countless plants and animals to understand how climate change could threaten populations. At Saint Louis University, scientists want to know if changes in temperature could affect the mating songs of insects.  

Biologists at SLU have received $480,000 from the National Science Foundation to study how temperature affects treehopper mating songs, which could provide clues as to how climate change could affect insect survival. The loss of insect species could adversely affect agriculture and many ecosystems that depend on them.

Muslim men in India will no longer be able to terminate their marriages in a matter of moments, after a split decision by the country's Supreme Court overruled the practice of "triple talaq."

Previously, Muslim men (and only men) could irrevocably end their marriages by repeating "talaq," the Arabic word for "divorce," three times. Women's rights advocates in India have fought to end the practice.

Missouri’s Senate leadership made the rare move of stripping Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal of her committee assignments on Tuesday.

It’s because of a Facebook comment she posted and later deleted last week that called for President Donald Trump’s assassination. She has resisted numerous calls from Republicans and Democrats, including Gov. Eric Greitens and U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, to step down.

Six years after a fatal crash caused China to throttle back its high-speed rail service, the country is relaunching the world's fastest inter-city lines, including one between Beijing and Shanghai that cuts an hour off the current travel time.

The operating speed of the new bullet trains, known as "Fuxing," or "Rejuvenation," will be 217 mph, according to Chinese media.

It was not until his late 20s that Vincent Doyle discovered that his dead godfather, a priest based central Ireland, was in fact his biological father. And Doyle, a Catholic himself, says that startling discovery inspired in him an abiding mission: to offer support to other children of Roman Catholic priests, who are bound by a vow of celibacy — and to ensure the church supports them, too.

Middle-Aged Men Need More Friends

22 hours ago

This program originally broadcast on March 23, 2017.

Men and friendship. By middle age, many have too little of it. And it’s a threat to men’s health.

The Buried, Secret Lives Of Trees

22 hours ago

This program originally broadcast on September 14, 2016.

The secret life of trees. They talk to each other, says forester Peter Wohlleben. They have families. We’ll sit down with the tree whisperer.

What if I told you there was a way to use technology to save an estimated $100 billion to $300 billion dollars a year in health care spending in the U.S.? That's the estimated cost incurred because people don't take the medications they're prescribed.

To get a sense of how severe the opioid crisis is in the U.S., you can look at the number of fatal overdoses — more than 33,000 in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That means, on average, 91 people are dying after overdosing on opioids each day. And for every fatal overdose, there are believed to be roughly 30 nonfatal overdoses.

On May 25, 1978, a package exploded at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., injuring a security guard. It was the first of a series of 16 bombings that would occur over the next 17 years, killing three people and injuring many others. The suspect in the case, a shadowy figure who frequently used the U.S. mail to send his homemade explosives, became known as the "Unabomber."

Wayne Bledsoe taught at the Missouri University of Science and Technology for 32 years and retired as chair and professor of history and political science in 2002. He later served as general manager of KMST, retiring from that position in 2014. But for nearly 40 years, Bledsoe has been both producer and host of the popular radio show Bluegrass for a Saturday Night.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

President Trump launched into a lengthy defense of his comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Va., and again derided the news media at an impassioned campaign rally in Phoenix.

President Trump returns Tuesday night to the same Phoenix convention center where he spoke during the campaign last year, laying out a 10-point plan to fight illegal immigration.

He's also visiting a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility in Yuma, Ariz., a few miles from the Southwest border.

Now seven months into his presidency, Trump has pushed for dramatic changes to the nation's immigration system. But he's also been stymied by Congress and by the courts.

A commuter train outside Philadelphia smashed into a parked train car, hurting 42 passengers early Tuesday, but an official said none of the injuries were life-threatening.

The collision happened just after midnight at the 69th Street Terminal Center in Upper Darby, Pa., about 10 miles west of Philadelphia, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority spokeswoman Heather Redfern told Reuters.

The Norristown High Speed Line train was pulling into the station when it hit a second, unoccupied train car. The operator was among those injured, she said.

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says he's "under no illusions" that President Trump will heed a late-hour plea to postpone a campaign rally planned in his city for Tuesday night.

"We don't want to cancel the presidential visit overall, but a delay would be the appropriate action by the White House," Stanton said at a news conference Monday afternoon.

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET

The commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet says Navy divers have found remains of some of the 10 sailors aboard the USS John S. McCain who were missing after the guided-missile destroyer collided with a merchant vessel in waters off Singapore earlier this week.

Adm. Scott Swift said the remains were found in compartments on the ship that were "significantly damaged" in Monday's collision, which left a gaping hole in the ship's port side.

Five years ago, before he was a candidate for president, Donald Trump was pretty sure he knew what to do about Afghanistan. It was a losing proposition, "a complete waste" in terms of "blood and treasure."

"Why are we continuing to train these Afghanis who then shoot our soldiers in the back?" he asked on Twitter in 2012. "Afghanistan is a complete waste. Time to come home!"

More recently, candidate Trump was less certain about exactly when the U.S. should exit the struggle that he had railed against continuing.

Before a solar project, Mark Holohan usually gives his customers plenty of time to mull over the cost. But lately, installers are scooping up panels so quickly that Holohan has trouble guaranteeing a price for too long.

"We have a sort of panic buying mode in the marketplace right now. Inventories have fallen. Availability has decreased. Prices have risen," Holohan, the solar division manager at Wilson Electric, said over the clatter of machines and workers in the company's warehouse outside Phoenix, Ariz.

President Trump's visit to Arizona is already fraught with controversy. The mayor of Phoenix asked the president to hold off staging a campaign rally in his city following the recent violence in Charlottesville, Va. Then, there are the hints Trump has dropped that he might issue a controversial pardon for the former local Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was recently convicted of criminal contempt of court for disobeying a federal judge.

President Trump inherited it with the presidency and now is putting the albatross that is Afghanistan around his own neck.

Eclipses are among the most predictable events on the planet. This one was known about for many decades before it crossed the U.S. earlier Monday.

Accordingly, people had been planning eclipse road trips for weeks in advance. They piled into planes and cars and made their way to the 70-mile-wide swath of land where the total eclipse would be visible. They checked online calculators, which told them the time of totality down to the second.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. with McCulloch statement — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens cited new DNA evidence in postponing Tuesday’s scheduled execution of Marcellus Williams.

Greitens also will appoint a five-member board of inquiry that will include retired Missouri judges. That hasn’t happened since 1997, according to Greitens spokesman Parker Briden.

A Chilean court dealt abortion rights activists a landmark victory Monday, approving a controversial bill that rolled back parts of one of the world's strictest abortion bans.

The bill passed by lawmakers earlier this month — after a years-long campaign by President Michelle Bachelet — added three exceptions to a law that for nearly three decades outlawed abortion in all cases. By a narrow margin, lawmakers rendered abortion legal when the pregnancy results from rape, when the pregnancy endangers the mother's life and when the fetus is unviable.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the prevention of child abuse in the St. Louis region with DiAnne Mueller, the Chief Executive Officer of the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery

The organization provides emergecy intervention, respite care and family support. The five nurseries and nine outreach centers under the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery umbrella serve more than 6,800 children every year. Over the past 31 years, they’ve served over 110,000 children.

Police in Finland say the man suspected of going on a stabbing rampage in the city of Turku, killing two people and injuring six others, is an 18-year old Moroccan citizen who was previously known to authorities.

Finland recently rejected his application for asylum, according to the public broadcaster YLE.

Update at 5:50 p.m. ET: At a news conference, Copenhagen police said a woman's torso — which was missing its head, arms and legs — was discovered later Monday in shallow water near Copenhagen. But they cautioned it was "too soon" to determine officially whether it was Kim Wall's body.


When the UC3 Nautilus sailed from the Port of Copenhagen on the evening of Aug. 10, the homemade submarine bore just two people: its famed Danish inventor and the Swedish journalist reporting on his invention.

Mo Willems Talks To Children – And Us

Aug 21, 2017

This program originally broadcast on February 16, 2017.

Mo Willems, acclaimed children’s author and illustrator, joins us to talk Knuffle Bunny, Nanette’s baguette and finding empathy in today’s world.

Ten sailors are missing from the USS John McCain after a collision with an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters.

Bradley Peniston (@navybook), deputy editor at Defense One, says it’s the fourth collision involving a U.S. Navy ship in just over a year. Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest.

Clemson, South Carolina, was one of the places across the U.S. located in the solar eclipse’s path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Nell Greenfieldboyce (@nell_sci_NPR), NPR science correspondent, about what she and other viewers in Clemson witnessed.

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