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William Bowen, a scholar and former president of Princeton University, died last week. He is associated with one of the key explanations for just why a college degree keeps getting more and more and more expensive.

Bowen, who was President of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and before that, led Princeton from 1972 to 1988, died Oct. 20 at the age of 83.

University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing's body camera was on when he pulled over Sam DuBose last year for a missing front license plate. From the footage, it is clear that Tensing is asking DuBose for his driver's license, and DuBose says he doesn't have it.

Nearly half of all American adults have been entered into law enforcement facial recognition databases, according to a recent report from Georgetown University's law school. But there are many problems with the accuracy of the technology that could have an impact on a lot of innocent people.

David Brancaccio

A super PAC with an allegiance to Donald Trump has been courting Pennsylvania's Amish community.

The Amish, who embrace simple living and reject modern conveniences, have historically been supportive of Republicans. But Trump isn't a conventional Republican nominee, said the Economist Magazine's Rosemarie Ward

Ward was recently in Amish Country near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She joined us to talk about the group's political leanings and how they might perceive Trump. 

Kim Adams

The National Basketball Association will, this season, become the first professional sports league to offer a regular schedule of live games delivered in virtual reality. At least one NBA League Pass game per week will be live-streamed in virtual reality. The move could be a big deal for the NBA and other sports. What is the technology involved?

Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters

The start of the assault on the ISIS stronghold of Mosul, in northern Iraq, was heralded by a broadcast message from Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi on October 16. He advised residents to hunker down. It was a message echoed by a massive leaflet campaign.

Next month, there's a world chess championship match in New York City, and the two competitors, the assembled grandmasters, the budding chess prodigies, the older chess fans — everyone paying attention — will know this indisputable fact: A computer could win the match hands down.

They've known as much for almost 20 years — ever since May 11, 1997. On that day, IBM's Deep Blue defeated the great Garry Kasparov who, after an early blunder, resigned in defeat.

Not so very long ago, colonoscopy was the gold standard for colon cancer screening. But times are a-changing. Last month when I went in for a checkup, my primary care doctor handed me a FIT test, a colon cancer test you can do at home without the unpleasantness and risk that turn people off to colonoscopy.

The FIT test, or fecal immunochemical blood test, is a newer and more accurate way to test for blood in stool, which can be a symptom of colon cancer.

Pascal Rossignol/Reuters

Over 1,000 migrants rode buses out of the Calais "Jungle" on Monday as French authorities kicked off an operation to dismantle the notorious camp that has become a symbol of Europe's refugee crisis.

"Bye-bye, Jungle!" one group of migrants shouted as they hauled luggage through the muddy lanes of the shantytown where thousands of mainly Afghans, Sudanese and Eritreans had holed up, desperate to sneak into Britain.

Around 1,200 police officers — some in riot gear — were on hand as several hundred migrants lined up for coaches that would take them to shelters across France.

Adeline Sire

For many migrants fleeing persecution in their homeland, England is the promised land. And hiding in the back of a truck is virtually the only way to get to it.

In 1999, Sabir Zazai snuck onto a UK-bound truck in northern France and got off in Dover, on England's east coast. For him, as for countless other Afghans, living under the oppressive rule of the Taliban had become too dangerous. He was 22 years old.

Moises Saman/National Geographic

In the now week-long battle for the strategic city of Mosul, the United States and coalition partners have pounded jihadist fighters with more targeted airstrikes than ever before. 

But ISIS combatants will not be easily dislodged.  

Those who've fled ISIS-controlled areas describe a reign of terror, including public executions that are mandatory viewing. Many forms of Western dress are prohibited, as is smoking, playing soccer and most cell phone use.  

Another aspect of daily life for civilians stuck in ISIS territory: Boredom. Serious boredom.

Carolyn Beeler/PRI

The stench of diesel is in the air. Asima Naqvi is standing on the side of a noisy highway in Pakistan, one of the few women on the road. She wears a stiff grey police uniform and avaitor sunglasses as she writes a ticket for a traffic violation.

Back in her patrol car, she has perfume spray in her purse for when the roadside smells grow overpowering. The feminine touch is a reminder that she is one of Pakistan's few female police officers in a man's world.

She’s doing more than enforcing the law. She’s breaking norms.

The cost of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is expected to rise an average of 22 percent in 2017, according to information released by the Obama administration Monday afternoon.

Still, federal subsidies will also rise, meaning that few people are likely to have to pay the full cost after the rate increases to get insurance coverage.

Pennsylvania's former attorney general, Kathleen Kane, has been sentenced to 10 to 23 months in jail after she was embroiled in a scandal that shook the state's political establishment.

Parents can reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome by keeping their child's crib in the same room, close to their bed, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The Iraqi military and its allies have been pushing for a week toward the city of Mosul, held by the Islamic State. For people fleeing the fighting, a few thousand so far, it's been an unbelievably frightening seven days.

In the Debaga camp for displaced people, about 50 miles southeast of Mosul, which is becoming more crowded, I sit with a family who tell me about leaving the village where they lived under ISIS more than two years.

There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming. But the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country.

Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts. Wyoming Public Radio’s Stephanie Joyce reports.

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado almost three years ago has given way to an industry of dispensaries, including Native Roots, the largest marijuana chain and license holder in the state.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson met with owner and CEO Josh Ginsberg about how he has seen the industry evolve, and the challenges he continues to face under burdensome regulations.

Remembering Activist And Author Tom Hayden

23 hours ago

The author, journalist, politician and one of the organizers of the anti-war protests at the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, died yesterday in California. He was 76.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young had a chance to speak with Hayden at the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this summer. He had suffered a stroke and was in a wheelchair.

But while his body was failing him, his mind was not — Hayden was still speaking out. Today, we’re revisiting that conversation, which aired in July.

New research finds little lies pave the way for big ones.

Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction was exhaustively explored in the first season of the hit podcast Serial, has asked a judge to release him on bail.

His lawyers said they filed the request in a Maryland court on Monday.

Syed is currently waiting to go to trial — again. This summer, a judge agreed that Syed's defense attorney had mishandled his case during his murder trial in 2000, and granted a new trial.

It's one thing to appreciate a 20-year-old fine wine. It is something else to brew up a 2,500-year-old alcoholic beverage.

While sifting through the remains of an Iron Age burial plot dating from 400 to 450 B.C. in what is today Germany, Bettina Arnold, an archaeologist and anthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and others uncovered a cauldron that contained remnants of an alcohol brewed and buried with the deceased.

More than 35 million eligible voters in the U.S. — about one in six — have a disability. And in the last presidential election, almost a third of voters with disabilities reported having trouble casting their ballots — whether it was getting into the polling place, reading the ballot, or struggling with a machine.

Despite some improvements, many of these voters are expected to face similar problems again this year.

Say this about Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte: He's not boring. Last week, on a state visit to Beijing, he dropped a bombshell during a speech to Chinese and Philippine business leaders about Manila's longtime treaty ally, the United States:

"Your honors, in this venue, I announce my separation from the United States. Both in military, not maybe social, but economics also."

His Chinese hosts were delighted to hear it, of course. But when he got home on Saturday, he walked it back.

Comic Chris Gethard knows what it's like to feel hopeless and alone. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he has experienced depression so severe that it led to suicidal thoughts. "I didn't like who I was," he says. "I spent a lot of my life regretting who I was, which is a sad thing to say."

Gethard relives some of his darkest moments in the one-man show, Career Suicide, which is billed as "a new comedy about suicide, depression, alcoholism, and all the other funniest parts of life."

Even Danes are trying to stop Donald Trump from becoming president

Oct 24, 2016
<a href="">Danmarks Socialdemokratiske Ungdom/Facebook</a>

With less than three weeks before election day and three bizarre presidential debates behind us, an unexpected group is on the ground stumping hard for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: the Social Democratic Youth of Denmark.

Forty members of the group have come to the US from Copenhagen to knock on doors and stop Republican nominee Donald Trump.

How YouTube became YouTube, told with YouTube videos

Oct 24, 2016
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Remember how Larry Page and Sergey Brin started Google in a garage? That garage belonged to Susan Wojcicki. The Palo Alto native eventually became Google's 16th employee. She ran Google's AdSense program for years and was then tapped to run YouTube, the video-sharing website that Google bought in 2006.

Oxford University Press has announced that its new edition of the complete works of William Shakespeare will credit Christopher Marlowe as a co-author on the three Henry VI plays.

Despite years of controversy about the authorship of some of Shakespeare's work, this is the first time a major publishing house has formally named Marlowe as a co-author.

Why broken ceasefires are actually good for peace

Oct 24, 2016

Ceasefires put in place in Syria and Yemen last week did not hold. But that doesn’t mean they were all for nothing.

French security forces have started evicting the thousands of migrants living in a notorious camp known as "The Jungle" near the port of Calais.

Authorities intend to dismantle the squalid camp that, despite its poor living conditions, has housed thousands of people fleeing wars or poverty for a better life in Europe. Many hope to reach the U.K. — which lies just 26 miles away across the English Channel. Others are seeking asylum in France.