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Asia
3:00 am
Mon September 19, 2011

U.S. Accuses Pakistan Of Harboring Haqqani Network

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 5:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's Morning Edition from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene in for Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Business
3:00 am
Mon September 19, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

Business
3:00 am
Mon September 19, 2011

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

Your Health
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

HPV Vaccine: The Science Behind The Controversy

Experts disagree about whether girls as young as 11 should get the HPV vaccine.
Mike Kemp iStockphoto.com

The first vaccine against human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer, came out five years ago. But now it's become a hot political topic, thanks to a Republican presidential debate in which candidate Michelle Bachmann inveighed against "innocent little 12-year-old girls" being "forced to have a government injection."

Behind the political fireworks is a quieter backlash against a public health strategy that's won powerful advocates in the medical and public health community.

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Monkey See
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

NBC's 'Prime Suspect' Hopes To Fill Some Very Big And Very British Shoes

Maria Bello plays Detective Jane Timoney — a revamped version of Helen Mirren's iconic Jane Tennison — in NBC's remake of the British drama Prime Suspect.
Patrick Harbron NBC

When a British television show is remade for an American audience, it usually hews closely to the original, at least at the uncertain beginning, while it fumbles to find its own identity.

The Office found one. Most don't.

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Europe
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Europe's Dilemma: More Integration Or Less?

European governments seem to be having a hard time deciding whether to come together or drift apart at a time of economic uncertainty.

Years from now, historians will no doubt say this was a crisis waiting to happen. The people who came up with the idea of a eurozone stopped halfway. The participating countries would use a common currency, but they wouldn't have common tax and spending policies — a monetary union but not a fiscal union.

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Law
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Could Texas' Redistricting Leave Latinos Behind?

The Texas State Capitol is seen late Jan. 18, in Austin.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 4:25 am

Political experts are keeping a close eye on Texas because it will pick up four new seats in the U.S. House of Representatives next year, thanks to a soaring Latino population. But civil rights groups and the U.S. Justice Department are signaling they may have some concerns about the redistricting process in Texas and whether it could put Latino voters at a disadvantage.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Lucretius, Man of Modern Mystery

Lucretius, circa 55 B.C.
Spencer Arnold Getty Images

Before he became a Professor of literature at Harvard, and way before he wrote his classic Shakespeare biography, Will in The World, Stephen Greenblatt was an I'll-read-anything kind of kid. One day, he was standing in the campus book store, and there, in a bin, selling for ten cents (good price, even in 1961) he noticed a thin, little volume called On the Nature of Things, by a Roman writer named Lucretius.

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The Evolution Of A Startup
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

The Ups And Downs Of A Tech Startup Rollercoaster

Craig Guenther-Lee (from left), Chad Reed and Naresh Dhiman co-founded Bluebox Now, a startup that links business' data about customers with information they posted online.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Bluebox Now is an aspiring, young startup that aims to revolutionize how companies market to their customers. Like entrepreneurs everywhere, the trio who founded the firm dream of making it big.

Now, they're trying to perfect their product, garner customers, bring in revenue and — they hope — profits.

Earlier this year, the founders of Bluebox Now, all in their 30s and 40s, were faced with a choice. The company they were working for was bought out, and they had to decide what to do next.

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Around the Nation
11:01 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Man's Call To America: Turn Off That Air Conditioner

Stan Cox has air conditioning in his Kansas house — but he only runs the unit about once a year, he says.
Bryan Thompson Kansas Public Radio

Originally published on Wed September 21, 2011 11:01 pm

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, this summer has been the second-hottest ever recorded in the United States, helping to push power demand in homes to record levels. As some worry that the growing use of fossil fuels to produce electricity for cooling is unsustainable, one man is urging Americans to live without air conditioning.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:00 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Teens And Tweens Find They Too Need Vaccines To Attend School

Trevor Reese, 13, gets his diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis booster shot from pediatric nurse practitioner Jenny Lu in Tustin, Calif., in August.
Jae C. Hong AP

Parents used to think that once their kids were out of elementary school, they were done with vaccines. But the rules are changing.

In California, middle schoolers and high schoolers now have to prove that they're immunized against pertussis, or whooping cough, in order to attend school. It's one of dozens of states that have recently passed laws requiring vaccines for teens and tweens.

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Middle East
3:15 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

American Presidents On Palestine

In 1948, President Truman endorsed the creation of an Israeli state. Nearly three decades later, before finalizing the Camp David accords, Jimmy Carter became the first U.S. president to call for the creation of a Palestinian "homeland." Presidents have put their own spins on that effort ever since. Here's a sampling:

March 16, 1977 — Carter, at a town hall meeting in Massachusetts, said that after Palestinians recognize Israel's right to exist, "There has to be a homeland provided for the Palestinian refugees who have suffered for many, many years."

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Television
2:34 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

'Mad Men's' Blankenship: Dying To Go To The Emmys

Actress Randee Heller (right) toasts Miss Ida Blankenship, the character that earned her an Emmy nomination for Mad Men.
Bobby Quillard

AMC's Mad Men is one of the big favorites at Sunday night's Emmy Awards — and this past season's most memorable character may have been Don Draper's new secretary, Miss Ida Blankenship.

Played by Randee Heller, Miss Blankenship was a departure from the attractive, attentive young girls that usually wait on Draper. She stole every scene she was in, even in death. Her passing was both shocking and comical and became one of the most talked-about moments of the TV season.

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Middle East
1:33 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

Jimmy Carter: 'No Downside' To Palestinian Statehood

A Palestinian flag is raised in front of European Union headquarters in Brussels on Monday, September 12th. The Palestinians are expected to seek statehood at the United Nations next week.
John Thys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 18, 2011 3:21 pm

Former President Jimmy Carter urges the United States to not veto the Security Council vote for Palestinian statehood anticipated to take place next week.

"If I were president, I'd be very glad to see the Palestinians have a nation recognized by the United Nations," Carter tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered. "There's no downside to it."

Carter admits that for President Obama, failure to veto "would have some adverse effects perhaps on his political future."

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Sports
12:20 pm
Sun September 18, 2011

And Then There Were 8? Big 12 In Jeopardy

Texas A&M head coach Mike Sherman looks on from the sideline during the Cotton Bowl last fall. Texas A&M has been approved to leave the Big 12 for the Southeastern Conference but is still at risk of lawsuits from Big 12 members.
Tony Gutierrez AP

The Big 12, an athletic conference composed of 10 colleges from the Central U.S., may soon need to rebrand itself as the Big 8. The possible departure of two of its members — Texas A&M and the University of Oklahoma — may destabilize not only the Big 12, but also the college football landscape.

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The News Tip On Weekend Edition Sunday
7:06 am
Sun September 18, 2011

The News Tip: Don't Get Distracted In Debates

Republican presidential candidates debate in California on Sept. 7. NBC's Brian Williams says a moderator's persistence can reveal which questions candidates want to avoid.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

The Republican presidential hopefuls will meet in Orlando on Thursday for their next debate. It's an additional opportunity for the candidates to try to set themselves apart in a crowded field. It's also a chance to take stock of the debate moderators.

NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik has this tip for the moderators: Don't get distracted.

He tells Weekend Edition host Audie Cornish that the "theatricality" of some debates can make people forget their purpose.

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Politics
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Obama's Deficit Plans Make Room For Jobs

On Monday, President Obama will lay out his new plan for reducing the federal deficit. His proposal will also include specific recommendations to the bipartisan deficit Super Committee on how to offset the cost of his $447 billion jobs plan. Host Audie Cornish talks with NPR's Mara Liasson.

Politics
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Obama's Re-Election: What Are The Odds?

With unemployment at 9.1 percent and the economy as the top issue of the 2012 presidential race, the president faces a tough fight for re-election. Still, he might find some encouragement in the history books. Host Audie Cornish chats with presidential historian Michael Beschloss about Obama's odds for re-election.

Medical Treatments
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

The Facts About The HPV Vaccine

There was a bit of a dust-up at last week's Republican candidate debate. It had to do with Texas governor Rick Perry's 2007 mandate that middle school girls in his state receive the HPV vaccine. Host Audie Cornish gets the facts on that vaccine from Dr. Jessica Kahn of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital.

Middle East
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Palestinian Statehood Strategy Headed For U.N. Clash

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 12:31 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, Host:

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas is scheduled to address the U.N. General Assembly this Friday, and take his statehood bid directly to the Security Council.

Maen Rashid Areikat is the Palestinian Liberation Organization's representative to the United States. He's part of the delegation that will introduce the bid at the U.N. this week. He explained the Palestinians' approach.

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Middle East
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Israel Braces For Palestinian Statehood Bid

Israel and the United States strongly object to the Palestinian effort to seek UN membership. Host Audie Cornish talks about the possible repercussions of the Palestinians' statehood bid with Michael Oren, the Israeli ambassador to the United States.

Strange News
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

The Beatles: Fab Four AND Civil Rights Activists

An old Beatles performance contract set to be auctioned gives some new insight into the values of the Fab Four early in their career. The document is for a 1965 concert and states that the group "not be required to perform in front of a segregated audience." Host Audie Cornish has more.

Business
7:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Customers Turn The Page On Borders

It's the final chapter for Borders. The once-dominant bookseller will close Sunday, a victim of growing online sales and other problems. NPR's Jeff Brady talks to customers in Pennsylvania making one last purchase.

Politics
5:05 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Can Michele Bachmann Get Her Groove Back?

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann arrives for a rally in Costa Mesa, Calif., on Friday.
Chris Carlson AP

Originally published on Sun September 18, 2011 9:26 pm

The presidential campaign has been a roller coaster for Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann.

From a back-of-the-pack start, the Tea Party favorite won an upset victory in the Iowa straw poll. Then, Texas Gov. Rick Perry got in the race and eclipsed her as a media headliner, and Bachmann's star fell. After a feisty debate appearance last week that put her back on an upswing, Bachmann headed to southern California to try and get her groove back.

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Environment
4:32 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Documenting The Sound Of Fallen Trees (And Planes)

Crater Lake National Park in southern Oregon.
Amelia Templeton for NPR

Researchers at Crater Lake National Park in southern Oregon have spent the past two years documenting the park's natural sound. Often, microphones will pick up the sound of falling trees, elks snacking and coyotes howling.

In even the most remote parts of the park, however, researchers are also hearing airplane noise 15 percent of the time.

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Making Babies: 21st Century Families
3:01 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Donor-Conceived Children Seek Missing Identities

Kathleen LaBounty, here with her daughter, Lexi, has been searching for her biological father.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Second in a two-part report.

Sperm donation has long been shrouded in secrecy, and that seemed in the best interest of both the donors and the couples who used their sperm. But now a generation of donor-conceived children has come of age, and many believe they should have the right to know who their biological parents are.

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U.S.
2:06 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Palestinian Statehood Bid Pits Obama Against Allies

President Obama addresses the Millennium Development Goals Summit at the United Nations headquarters in 2010.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 12:30 pm

President Obama flies to New York on Monday for an annual presidential tradition that this year could become a diplomatic disaster.

It's the meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, when world leaders gather to address the world's problems. The Palestinians plan to ask the U.N. to recognize them as an independent state this week, which puts Obama on a collision course with some of America's closest allies.

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Around the Nation
5:10 pm
Sat September 17, 2011

Nine Die, Dozens Injured After Nevada Air Crash

The death toll rises to 9 in Friday's plane crash at a Reno, Nevada, air show. The pilot and at least eight other people died when a World War II-era plane crashed into the crowd. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz gets the latest from Brian Duggan, a reporter for the Reno Gazette Journal, who's at the site of the crash.

U.S.
3:37 pm
Sat September 17, 2011

Do New Voting Laws Suppress Fraud? Or Democrats?

While campaigning to become Kansas' secretary of state, Kris Kobach held a press conference to make the case for a photo ID requirement at the polls. In his argument, he noted that a man named Alfred K. Brewer, who died in 1996, had voted in the 2010 primary.

There was just one problem with that: Brewer wasn't dead.

Shortly after the press conference, Brewer's wife received a call regarding her husband's "passing."

"And she says, 'Well, why do you want to talk to me? He's out raking leaves,'" Brewer says.

New Crackdowns

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Politics
2:00 pm
Sat September 17, 2011

What Can Obama Do Improve His Approval Rating?

A new New York Times-CBS News poll shows President Obama with an approval rating of 43 percent. That, and other tough news for the president have prompted at least one major Democratic voice, James Carville, to call for a round of White House firings. Weekends on All Things Considered Guy Raz speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about what Obama needs to do to right the ship.

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