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Many travelers have resigned themselves to paying $25 or more to check a bag when flying. But that fee becomes especially onerous when the bag doesn't show up on the carousel at baggage claim.

The White House is proposing a new rule that would require airlines to refund the checked baggage fee if luggage is "substantially delayed," though it does not define "substantially."

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

The unemployment rate for transgender people is double that of the general population. Now, California has set up the nation's first ever large-scale program to help transgender people find jobs.

And it's all because of Michaela Mendelsohn, a trans woman who's employed trans people at her restaurants for years.

'I'm A Trans Owner Supporting Trans People'

Best-selling author Scott Turow once described the act of being a Chicago Cubs fan as "quasi-spiritual."

He's right. Generations of Cubs fans have come and gone without ever seeing their belief in the team validated. It's been 108 years running without a title.

There's something about that blind faith that feels holy to Chicago's North Siders. Their fandom is purer and more absolute because they give of themselves over and over again and get nothing in return. (No World Series wins, at least.)

At a hearing last month on the possible hacking of voting machines, Louisiana Secretary of State Tom Schedler said he was more worried about something else. The real threat on Election Day, said Schedler, is violence at the polls.

Gap years: just for the rich?

Oct 19, 2016
David Brancaccio

The idea of a gap year between high school and college is becoming increasingly popular for young people fortunate enough to afford it. Taking time off to travel, volunteer or work is ideally supposed to give students the chance to mature and get more out of college when they start.  

One fan of the gap year is New York Times columnist Ron Lieber. He wrote a book on this called "Taking Time Off" in 1996. Now he's checking in with the students he spoke to back then to see how it worked out. 

The election is giving investors heartburn

Oct 19, 2016
Mark Garrison

The wild battles between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump — along with the various smaller skirmishes that will determine control of Congress — have been blamed for swings on Wall Street. Should Americans consider changing their retirement portfolios because of what’s happening on the campaign trail? The short answer is no.

Click the above audio player to hear from retirement savings experts about what really matters when it comes to long-term financial planning.

The big banks post a surprisingly strong quarter

Oct 19, 2016
Lane Wallace

In the past week, profits at Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, and Goldman Sachs all beat expectations. The big banks are seeing stronger results even though the interest-rate and regulatory environments haven’t changed, factors that the banks have blamed for disappointing results in the past.

Donald Trump was the man Hillary Clinton needed to win the women's vote

Oct 18, 2016

It seems an unlikely paradox: In a country where women outnumber men in all but nine states, the first woman in US history to run for president, as a major party nominee, has struggled to win a strong majority of women voters. For most of her 2016 presidential run, Hillary Clinton has not been able to get the vote of women. As it turns out — ironically or not — it has taken a man to do it for her: Donald Trump.

Nobody loves pesticides, exactly. But one kind of pesticide, called neonicotinoids, is provoking a particularly bitter debate right now between environmentalists and farmers. The chemicals are highly toxic to bees. Some scientists think they are partly to blame for the decline in pollinators.

For the past year, the province of Ontario, in Canada, has responded to the controversy with a novel experiment. Ontario's government is asking farmers to prove that they actually need neonicotinoids, often called neonics. It turns out that "need" is a word that's hard to define.

Is Russia pursuing a 'Grozny' solution for Aleppo?

Oct 18, 2016

Secretary of State John Kerry has criticized Russia for pursuing what he called a "Grozny strategy" in the battle underway for control of the Syrian city of Aleppo. It's a reference to Russia's actions in Chechnya decades ago, which perhaps could be paraphrased as “peace through obliteration.”

The Russians are not happy about it.

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Chuck Berry turns 90 Tuesday. I know he's a very important person in music history, but he's never been a guy I listened to much. I mean, I've heard hits like "Maybellene" from 1955, but I wanted to learn more.

So I called Tony Trov. He's an artist out of Philadelphia, but more important, he plays in a Chuck Berry cover band called It's Marvin, Your Cousin Marvin Berry, a reference to a memorable scene in Back to the Future.

How would Donald Trump "drain the swamp" in Washington as he puts it? Two words: term limits.

At a rally in Colorado Springs, Colo., Tuesday, Trump said if elected in November he will "push for a constitutional amendment to impose term limits on all members of Congress."

A day in the life of immigration limbo

Oct 18, 2016
Daniel Becerril/Reuters

Estela works the night shift at a fish processing factory in Boston. She sorts freshly caught white fish, picking out the occasional parasite or worm. Once she's back home, at 8 a.m., her two older boys, ages 12 and 15, have already made their way to school. Typically, Estela then naps before picking up her toddler from day care.

But today is different. It's a Tuesday, when an immigration officer is supposed to check up on her. The officer comes most Tuesdays, but not all. There is no set time for his visit, just that it will be some time before 4 p.m. 

An Iranian-American father and son have been sentenced to 10 years in prison in Iran, according to the Iranian state-run judicial news agency. The State Department is calling for their immediate release and says they are "unjustly detained."

Siamak and Baquer Namazi were convicted of "cooperating with the U.S government against Iran," NPR's Michele Kelemen tells All Things Considered.

The Obama administration is announcing a series of recommendations for ensuring the safety of the nation's more than 400 underground natural gas storage wells.

Matthew Bell 

Bullhorn in hand, union organizer Kelly McGuire flips between Spanish and English as he rallies a group of striking dining hall workers outside of the Harvard Business School on this damp and gray weekday morning.

“We know what we’re doing is working. We gotta keep pushing,” says the red-bearded McGuire, a representative of Unite Here Local 26. 

Negotiations between the union and Harvard University started back in May. Then, two weeks ago, more than 700 cafeteria and food service workers walked off the job. 

Funeral bells around the world are tolling for Aleppo

Oct 18, 2016

Hundreds of churches across the world are ringing funeral bells to draw attention to the suffering Syrian city of Aleppo. 

The campaign started in the parish of Kallio in Finland, the idea of Teemu Laajasalo, a local Lutheran vicar. According to Laajasalo, the project was born out of anger and sadness at the ongoing carnage in Aleppo, where tens of thousands of people have been forced to flee, and tens of thousands more are under siege. 

In coal country, thousands of miners have lost jobs. While there aren't any easy solutions, in West Virginia, two farmers are doing what they can to keep wealth in their community and provide healthy food to more people.

In the parking lot of the Five Loaves and Two Fishes Food Bank in McDowell County, squash and basil are growing in 18 tall white towers without any dirt. It's a farming method called hydroponics. The vegetables sprout from tiny holes as water and nutrients flood the roots.

Mohamedou Ould Slahi, who was imprisoned by the United States in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for more than 14 years, was released on Monday, according to the Pentagon.

The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurers from discriminating against people with serious illnesses, but some marketplace plans sidestep that taboo by making the drugs that people with HIV need unavailable or unaffordable, complaints filed recently with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Civil Rights allege.

Stargazers, ready your telescopes: An unusual lunar event is going to be visible across large portions of the U.S.

It's called an "occultation," in which the waning gibbous moon will pass over the huge, bright orange star of Aldebaran. We thought the phenomenon's spooky name might be just the thing to get geared up for Halloween.

Fifty-two years after President Lyndon Johnson declared his “War on Poverty,” 20 percent of the country’s 74 million children live below the poverty line — many well below.

The recently released 2015 U.S. Census data show some improvement over 2014, but those gains don’t affect the children who live in the poorest households.

Emily Núñez Cavness was a student at Middlebury College — and the only member of the campus ROTC — when she formed the idea for the company she started with her sister, called Sword & Plough.

Now an active military officer and CEO, Cavness works to reuse military surplus to create bags and other accessories. Veterans are a big part of the process, from design to sales to the models on the company’s website.

On Election Day this November, about 1 in 4 Americans will vote using a device that never lets the voter see a copy of his or her vote on paper.

The United States often chastises African countries about elections that are less than free and fair — occasionally slapping on sanctions and other punitive measures. But with Donald Trump claiming the U.S. vote could be rigged, Africans are taking to social media to turn the tables.

President Obama had some harsh words for Donald Trump's charges that the presidential election is going to be rigged — "Stop whining."

Pedals, New Jersey's beloved upright-walking black bear, appears to have been a casualty of this year's bear hunt.

The wild animal had been captured on film ambulating in a distinctly human fashion — hence his name, short for "bipedal." Pedals had a visible disability in his front forepaws, though he appeared to be in good health surviving in the wild.

The man from Mosul is neat and tidy, in his mid-30s. He uses careful English and tries to stop his voice from trembling as he speaks about the Iraqi city he lived in all his life.

"My mind is full with memories," he says. "Friends. Home. You know — my home. I was born there."

ISIS has occupied Mosul for more than two years. Residents describe a regime of strict rules and savagely violent punishments for breaking them. The man is too afraid of ISIS to give his name or occupation, but he is a professional. He brought up a family in Mosul.