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2:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

In Russia, Protesters Take To The Streets

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 6:22 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Thousands of protestors took to the streets tonight in Moscow. They accused the party of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin of stealing votes in Russia's parliamentary elections. The party United Russia won 50 percent of the vote. That's significantly less than it has in the past and less than the party was expected to win this time around. Still, independent monitors and the protestors say the vote was rigged.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

FAA Administrator Charged With DWI

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 1:28 pm

The head of the Federal Aviation Administration, who among other duties is in charge of the nation's air traffic controllers, was charged with driving while intoxicated Saturday night in Fairfax, Va., a suburb of Washington, D.C.

And Federal News Radio says Jerome "Randy" Babbitt has now been "placed on a leave of absence." The Associated Press reports that the leave was "at Babbitt's request."

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Books
1:18 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

John Lithgow's On-Stage 'Education'

Provided by the publisher

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 12:45 pm

John Lithgow was born into a theater family, but he never intended to become an actor; he wanted to paint. But ever since he first took the stage as a toddler, he was a hit — and he's gone on to win numerous awards for his work in television, theater and film.

In his memoir, Drama: An Actor's Education, Lithgow focuses on the years before the fame — from his stage debut at the age of 2 and his college years at Harvard, right up to the moment when he moved out West and became a star.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Crippled Japanese Nuclear Plant Continues To Leak Radioactive Water

This handout picture, taken by Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) shows radioactive water on the floor inside the building of a water treatment facility at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.
TEPCO AFP/Getty Images

Over the weekend, the company that runs the Japanese nuclear plant crippled by the earthquake and tsunami in March said they had detected another leak of radioactive water. This time, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) said, 45 tons of contaminated water had been found outside the cooling system and about 300 liters of it had leaked into the Pacific Ocean.

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Education
12:47 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

A Carrot for College Performance: More Money

This year, Tennessee Tech's $35 million in state funding will go up or down based solely on whether students are succeeding.
By Brian Stansberry Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 6:22 pm

For a long time, most public colleges and universities have gotten their funding based on how many students they enroll: More students mean more money.

But economic pressures have convinced states they should only reward results that help students — and the state's economy.

Tennessee is a leader among states trying to peg funding to the number of students who actually graduate.

Getting Education To Do More For The State

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Newt Gingrich
12:27 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Gingrich's Health Care Consultancy: Is It Lobbying?

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, shown at an event on health care on Capitol Hill this March, founded the Center for Health Transformation.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 6:27 pm

In between his speakership and his presidential candidacy, Newt Gingrich built a network of organizations to promote his causes — and himself.

Informally known as Newt Gingrich Inc., those entities have flourished. But questions linger, especially about two of them: the Gingrich Group, a for-profit consulting firm; and a unit of the Gingrich Group called the Center for Health Transformation.

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Humans
12:21 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

For Creative People, Cheating Comes More Easily

New research suggests that people who are more creative are more likely to cheat.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 6:22 pm

Five months after the implosion of Enron, Feb. 12, 2002, the company's chief executive, Ken Lay, finally stood in front of Congress and the world, and placed his hand on a Bible.

At that point everyone had questions for Lay. It was clear by then that Enron was the product of a spectacular ethical failure, that there had been massive cheating and lying. The real question was: How many people had been dishonest? Who was in on it?

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Queen Elizabeth's 'Pay' Has Been Frozen

Queen Elizabeth II in November.
Cris Jackson/pool AFP/Getty Images

She'll still get about $50 million a year in taxpayers' money to run her palaces and travel the world, but there's word from the U.K. that Queen Elizabeth II has had her "pay" frozen until at least 2015.

Hard times, after all, require sacrifices.

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World
12:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Limited Options to De-Escalate Violence In Syria

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 2:28 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the weekend, as the number killed rose over 4,000, one U.N. official took the considered step of describing the situation in Syria as a civil war. While much of the opposition to the government of Bashar al-Assad remains peaceful, defectors from the military have taken up arms, neighborhoods have formed ad-hoc militias, political and military opposition groups have established a presence across the border in Turkey.

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Politics
12:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

What Cain's Exit Means For The Republican Field

Herman Cain quit the presidential primary over the weekend and an Atlanta TV station reports that he may endorse his former rival, Newt Gingrich. NPR's Ken Rudin talks about Cain's decision to quit, and how it will change the primary field.

Education
12:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Hrabowski Works To Narrow The Achievement Gap

When Freeman Hrabowski became president of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County in 1992, he made it his mission to close the achievement gap. UMBC now sends more African-African students to graduate school in science and technology than any other predominantly white university in the U.S.

Opinion
12:00 pm
Mon December 5, 2011

Op-Ed: Treating Families That Don't Immunize

Many doctors complain that the few patients who refuse immunizations put all patients at risk, and some refuse them treatment. New York Times Ethicist Ariel Kaminer addresses the question of whether it's ethical for pediatricians to refuse routine care to families with unvaccinated children.

Shots - Health Blog
11:47 am
Mon December 5, 2011

Teens Aren't the Rampant Sexting Maniacs We Thought

They're probably just texting their moms.
Mark Rose iStockphoto.com

Teens sharing totally inappropriate naked photos on their phones: Sexting sounded so plausible, it just had to be true.

But now it turns out that's the vast majority of teenagers aren't sexting at all.

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The Two-Way
11:37 am
Mon December 5, 2011

Who Are The 1 Percent? Gallup Finds They're A Lot Like The 99 Percent

A protestor carries a sign as she marches down Market Street during a day of action in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement on Dec. 2 in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 11:42 am

The Occupy movement has refocused the national conversation to income inequality. As we've reported in the past, this Tumbler blog puts a face on who the 99 percent are.

But who are the 1 percent?

Today, Gallup released analysis that looked at households who earned more than $500,000 annually and found that in many cases they were a "mirror image" of the 99 percent.

Among the findings:

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Around the Nation
11:34 am
Mon December 5, 2011

Drone Technology Finding Its Way To American Skies

A Predator drone unmanned aerial vehicle takes off on a U.S. Customs Border Protection mission from Fort Huachuca, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Unmanned aircraft — or drones — are playing a large role in U.S. military operations in Afghanistan but they're starting to show up in increasing numbers in U.S. as well. Drones are already used to patrol the border with Mexico and now they may soon be coming to a police department near you.

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