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NORAD scrambled two F-16 fighter jets to escort an American Airlines flight traveling from Los Angeles to New York, today, after three passengers locked themselves in a bathroom and refused to come out.

The AP reports:

Flight 34 landed safely after 4 p.m. Sunday. The nature of the incident was unclear but a law enforcement official says it isn't thought to be terrorism.

How Aaron Brown Became CNN's Voice Of Sept. 11

Sep 11, 2011

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Aaron Brown came into work at CNN still preparing for his new role as the anchor of the network's flagship evening broadcast. He wasn't supposed to go on air for several more weeks, but on that morning and in the days that followed, Brown became the guide for millions of viewers glued to their television sets.

As he scurried to the roof of CNN's headquarters in New York shortly after the towers were hit, Brown remembers stopping in the middle of 8th Avenue and telling himself to stay calm.

It took journalist and author William Langewiesche several days to get to ground zero after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The airports were closed, and he lived in California.

But as soon as he arrived, he and his editors at the Atlantic Monthly began frantically trying to gain access to the highly restricted site where the Twin Towers had stood.

Langewiesche contacted the head of an obscure city agency, the Department of Design and Construction, Kenneth Holden.

John Ashcroft's term as attorney general under George W. Bush was redefined by Sept. 11.

And he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that the techniques endorsed by his Justice Department were necessary, from warrantless wiretaps to so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques."

Defending The Patriot Act

One of Ashcroft's most controversial legacies is the Patriot Act, a piece of legislation that dramatically expanded the surveillance capabilities of law enforcement for monitoring terrorism suspects.

Honoring The Four-Legged Heroes

Sep 11, 2011

NPR's Joel Rose was in New Jersey today, where he stumbled upon another Sept. 11 tribute:

A different breed of heroes from September 11th gathered across the Hudson River from Ground Zero. Dozens of service and therapy dogs from around the country gathered with their handlers at Liberty State Park. The event, billed as "Finding One Another," was intended to celebrate the contributions of search and rescue dogs on 9/11 and since.

Though it is widely recognized as "one of the finest pieces of American presidential prose," as The Associated Press wrote in 2008, the "Bixby Letter" that President George W. Bush read this morning during the Sept. 11 memorial service in New York City has been the subject of several questions over the years.

Rebels Face Resistance From Pro-Gadhafi Forces

Sep 11, 2011

Libyan rebels are massed Sunday outside two cities that remain in the hands of forces loyal to ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi.

Rebels tried to advance Saturday on the town of Bani Waleed, about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli, but the advance was aborted, apparently to clear the way for NATO airstrikes on loyalist positions.

At Ground Zero, Families Are Exploring The New Quiet Space

Sep 11, 2011

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Brendan Banaszak tells us that at Ground Zero, families of those killed there are already turning the new memorial into a quiet place of remembrance.)

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's another musical moment from the ceremony in New York.

Singer/songwriter Paul Simon performed his class The Sound of Silence.

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Joel Rose tells us of an early morning service in New Jersey.)

Across the Hudson River from the World Trade Center, hundreds of people gathered on the New Jersey waterfront for a ceremony to honor the residents of Jersey City who died 10 years ago today.

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's something quiet.

A short time ago at the memorial service in New York, cellist Yo-Yo Ma performed Sarabande from Bach's First Suite for Cello Solo.

At 8:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush addressed the nation about that day's tragic events. Here's what he said:

Today was a day of mourning for the country. The 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 was marked by prayers, solemn ceremonies, vows to remember the victims and pledges to never let terrorists fundamentally change the American way of life.

A truck bombing at an American base in eastern Afghanistan late Saturday killed two Afghan civilians — one of them a 3-year-old girl — and wounded nearly 80 U.S. military personnel, The Associated Press reports.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility.

According to the AP:

Although thousands of miles from ground zero, the Muslim community in San Diego, Calif., drew attention after Sept. 11, 2001. Two of the hijackers lived there. They also prayed at a local mosque, where noted radical Imam Anwar al-Awlaki preached. Recently, several men from the Somali Muslim community were arrested. They've been charged with aiding a Somali terrorist group.

A local imam has been working to open dialogue between Muslims and the larger community in San Diego in part to combat the suspicion that arose after the local ties came to light.

The Department of Homeland Security and state governments spend billions of dollars every year on domestic security, helping cities and counties buy up-to-date equipment and strategies for defeating terrorists.

Established in November 2002, the new department absorbed 22 different federal agencies, with the idea of unifying homeland security efforts. But after all this time, have those efforts made us safer?

At least 77 American soldiers are wounded after a truck bomb targeted a base west of Kabul. Two separate roadside bombs have killed 10 Afghan civilians.

At an American military base in Wardak Province, a truck full of firewood rammed into the main gate before exploding in flames and shrapnel. Military officials said a blast wall absorbed most of the impact, but nearly 100 Afghan and American personnel suffered injuries. Wardak borders the Afghan capital, Kabul, but the province is considered to be partially under Taliban control.

No company suffered on Sept. 11 as much as the bond broker Cantor Fitzgerald, which lost 658 people. One of the few employees to survive that day was Lauren Manning, who was in the lobby of the World Trade Center's North Tower when the first plane hit.

Manning had been rushing to an elevator and was instantly engulfed in flames that came into the lobby, leaving her with burns on more than 80 percent of her body.

The terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, have been pegged as the moment that changed everything for Americans. Nothing was supposed to be the same after the attacks, and it was expected to usher in a new era for America.

Writer George Packer remembers having a moment of optimism.

Memorial To Flight 93 Dedicated In Pa.

Sep 10, 2011

Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton join current Vice President Joe Biden at a ceremony in Shanksville, Pa., where United Flight 93 crashed 10 years ago tomorrow.

Corporate Taxes: How Low Can You Go?

Sep 10, 2011

The idea that America's 35 percent corporate tax rate is stifling U.S. economic growth is almost an article of faith among some politicians.

The sound bites from Republican presidential debates to campaign stops are basically interchangeable: "We need to bring that corporate tax rate down."

But in fact, very few corporations pay taxes on 35 percent of their profits. With the help of complex international tax loopholes, some companies manage to pay almost no corporate tax at all.

'Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich'

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, reshaped the U.S. foreign policy agenda, says Doug Feith, who was undersecretary of defense for policy in the Bush administration.

He sees the top two goals of that new agenda as achieved: preventing future attacks and disrupting terror networks. But he says the U.S. failed on the other goal: countering ideological support for terrorism.

Millions of people, including my children, have been born since September 11, 2001. This year, I find myself wondering how to tell them about that day and those that followed. Maybe the most we can hope for is to pass on a few memories of New York then.

All of the photographs that sprouted on lampposts and walls: smiling faces snapped on vacations and joyous occasions, suddenly underscored with wrenching, urgent words, and question marks that pierced like hooks:

Libya's victorious rebels say they will soon launch operations against the last three Libyan towns still held by forces loyal to ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. Host Scott Simon talks to NPR's Corey Flintoff from Bani Walid, in the desert south of Tripoli.

Letters: FEMA, Boise, Quotations

Sep 10, 2011

Host Scott Simon reads listener comments about last week's show.

As Election Nears, Jobs Are First Priority

Sep 10, 2011

NPR's Andrea Seabrook joins host Scott Simon to talk about how Congress — particularly its GOP members — are responding to the president's appeal for stimulus spending to create jobs.

NPR's summer road trip series, "Honey Stop the Car!" pulls over in Richmond, Va., where a statue of tennis great Arthur Ashe stands in an unlikely place. It's among statues of major figures from the Confederacy. Allison Keyes

In observance of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, host Scott Simon talks with former British Prime Minister Tony Blair about the U.K.'s role in fighting terrorism and Britain's relationship with the U.S.

Protesters Attack Israeli Embassy In Cairo

Sep 10, 2011

Angry Egyptian protesters attacked the Israeli Embassy in Cairo overnight, breaching the building and sending the Israeli ambassador, his family and most embassy staff fleeing. Host Scott Simon gets the latest from NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo.

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