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Economists have been looking over the $447 billion job-creation package President Obama proposed to Congress Thursday night. Predictably, the reaction was mixed, with most economists giving it a thumbs up, and many conservatives turning thumbs down.

Here are a few of the economists' opinions that were blogged, tweeted, reported or emailed around.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission handed down a long awaited decision today that allows the Obama administration to continue its plans to close Yucca Mountain, the nuclear waste dump in Nevada.

The AP reports:

This morning The Guardian has a report about a 2004 incident concerning one of Moammar Gadhafi's most prominent children. Based on documents the paper found in Gadhafi's compound in Libya, The Guardian reports that in 2004, the United Kingdom offered Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi protection after the government uncovered an assassination plot.

The Guardian reports:

One of the creepier stories in recent weeks has been about feet found along the shores of Washington state and British Columbia. There have been 11 or so discovered since 2007 — usually in athletic shoes.

Jake Ellison at NPR member station KPLU set out to see if he could figure out what's going on, and starts his report with this attention-getting line:

"There are likely hundreds of dead human bodies in the waters of the Northwest at any given time."

One of the most unsettling truths facing President Obama and the nation is that there really was little precedent in modern history for the financial crisis that hit the globe in 2007 and continues.

As economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff note in "This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly," their examination of economic crises going back eight centuries:

There's a hoary bit of advice in journalism that still gets passed from old-school editors to newbies: "If your mother says she loves you, check it out."

So what about your doctor? The nonprofit investigative journalism outfit ProPublica has a tool you can use to see how much money your doctor has received from drug companies. ProPublica is kind enough to share it for all to use, so I've embedded it in this post. Have at it.

American Jobs Act Holds Promise?

Sep 9, 2011

President Obama presented his jobs plan to Congress Thursday evening. It proposes tax cuts to businesses that hire new employees, reforms to the unemployment insurance system and investments in schools and infrastructure. Host Michel Martin discusses the plan with National Urban League President Marc Morial and small business owner Andy Shallal.

Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner on Friday defended President Obama's new jobs plan. In a Morning Edition interview, Geithner said that if passed, the plan unveiled Thursday night "would have a substantial, powerful effect on strengthening the economy." He said that tax cuts aimed at small businesses who hire new workers would boost employment quickly.

The $447 billion package of tax cuts, infrastructure spending and aid to states "is designed to make the economy stronger now and get more Americans back to work," Geithner told host Steve Inskeep.

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, inflicted the single greatest loss of life ever suffered by a police department in U.S. history. The department wasn't the New York Police — it was the less well-known Port Authority Police Department. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey polices the bridges and tunnels around New York, and it also was in charge of security at the Twin Towers. It's a small, tight-knit department, and it lost 37 officers that day.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with an update on a hot dog war.

Kraft Foods and Sara Lee settled dueling lawsuits. Kraft claims its Oscar Mayer hot dogs defeated Sara Lee's Ball Park Franks. Sara Lee claimed to be America's best franks. And each company sued the other for exaggeration. Now the companies have settled out of court. Each will drop its claim that the other's hot dog wasn't so great. This way they avoid the danger of the court ruling that they were both right.

It's been rumored for a few days, and now it's official: Eddie Murphy will host the Oscars in 2012, the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences announced today.

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

Not having a summer or after-school job affects more than just a kid's wallet. It also has real consequences for his or her personal and economic development.

While the overall unemployment rate is stuck at 9.1 percent, the unemployment rate for 16- to 19-year-olds has been going up since February. Currently 25.4 percent of teenagers who want jobs can't find them.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: A federal regulator has filed a lawsuit against 17 financial firms - some of them the biggest names on Wall Street. The suit alleges misrepresentation and negligence in the sale of mortgage securities. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

There's a quote carved into the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on the National Mall: "I was a drum major for justice, peace, and righteousness."

Except, as poet Maya Angelou pointed out this week, it's not a quote. It's a concentrated paraphrase that takes a word here and there from a speech that begins with Dr. King saying that he didn't wanted to be lauded, but --

"If you want to say that I was a drum major," he began, "say that I was a drum major for justice ..."

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Israel is facing growing diplomatic isolation in its region. Yesterday, Turkey expelled the Israeli ambassador and other diplomats from Ankara, and the popular protest known as the Arab Spring have eroded Israel's ties with some other neighbors. To talk about all this we have James Hider on the line. He's a correspondent for the Times of London who is based in Jerusalem. James, thanks for being with us.

JAMES HIDER: Morning.

Football Gives Ailing Community Reason To Cheer

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: And perhaps this year nowhere is college football more important and long awaited than in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Back in April, a massive tornado ripped across town, killed dozens of people and destroyed thousands of buildings. A return to football in this football town is almost a return to normalcy, as Alabama Public Radio's Ryan Vasquez reports.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The country is facing two more major storms, just a week after Irene barreled up the East Coast. Tropical Storm Lee is already pelting parts of the Gulf Coast with rain, and Hurricane Katia is farther out in the Atlantic and threatening to hit in the next few days.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. In Libya, victorious rebels are struggling to organize themselves after taking over Tripoli and sending Moammar Gadhafi into hiding. There's a lack of water, medicine and basic supplies in the capital. A stabilization committee's been formed. Among its members is a man that NPR profiled last May. He's from the city of Misrata, west of Tripoli, that saw some of the bloodiest fighting of the Libyan War.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: The Big Dipper has a shiny new sequin on its handle, it's a supernova, the magnificent last hurrah of a star. This weekend is a rare opportunity for amateurs to see a supernova from Earth. People all over the country will be able to catch a glimpse of the fireball from their backyards, as it reaches peak brightness over the next few nights.

Peter Nugent is an astronomer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, joins us from a studio there.

Dr. Nugent, thanks for being with us.

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: And I love sports. Perjury charges, bar brawls, speeding. In fact, I'm working on a TV pilot.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLANK CLANK)

SIMON: Law and Order: Sports. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us.

Hi there, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN: Hi, Scott.

Voice Of America's Role In Internet Age

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: This week is the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, was coordinating the national relief effort in Hurricane Irene's wake. Texas congressman and Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul was calling for the agency's elimination. He said quote, "FEMA has one of the worst reputations for a bureaucracy ever. It's a system of bureaucratic central economic planning, which is a policy that is deeply flawed."

Letters: Relay Race, King Memorial

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF LETTERS THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: Last week, we interviewed filmmaker Christoph Baaden about Oregon's near 200-mile relay race Hood to Coast.

CHRISTOPH BAADEN: There really isn't any kind of prize money or different medals for people finishing this thing first. It's just for the love of, I think, of running but more importantly, camaraderie.

Sybil Ludington: Paul Revere In A Skirt?

Sep 3, 2011

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SCOTT SIMON, host: We've been motoring through the summer with our road trip Honey, Stop the Car. We're curious about those commemorative plaques and monuments in towns all over the country that honor local heroes or events. This morning - markers. Member station WSHU takes us to New York's Hudson River Valley and to a dramatic statue of a teenage girl from the Revolutionary War.

About two years ago, I introduced all of you to a game. I quote from that entry:

"Any time a scary movie apparently involves a decent-sized cast of people placed in a closed environment, it's a good time to play a game I like to call Pets Or Meat.

When Is Eid? Muslims Can't Seem To Agree

Aug 30, 2011

Today is Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the holy month of fasting. Except that it isn't.

Today, many Muslims in the United States, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Jordan are celebrating Eid. Meanwhile, many Muslims in Indonesia, South Africa, India and Oman are not celebrating Eid until Wednesday.

Green Tomato Pickle

Aug 30, 2011

South Indian pickles are pungent salty, sour, spicy condiments, meant to aid digestion with helpful fermented bacteria while adding a shot of flavor and spice to your food. Some recipes ferment the vegetables and spices for several days, but for those with bad pickling luck, you can try this cooked version instead. A healthy dollop brightens up bland rice dishes, or provides a nice complement to your curry.

Make about 1 1/2 cups

Fried Green Tomatoes With Shrimp Remoulade

Aug 30, 2011

This recipe, a Southern classic, comes from New Orleans' famous Upperline Restaurant. The hot fried tomatoes are set off by the tangy, mustardy, chilled shrimp remoulade. The remoulade sauce can be made up to 3 weeks in advance.

Makes 4 appetizer or 2 main dish servings

1/2 cup Creole mustard (if available; otherwise substitute another mustard)

2 tablespoons ketchup

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons prepared horseradish

1 garlic clove, minced

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1 1/2 teaspoons paprika

Yes, it was Albert Einstein who unified space and time together into a single, coherent whole. As a physicist I can say that was a pretty impressive feat, but as parent — slogging across interstate whatever on the last weekend of the summer — I have to ask: What's the big deal?

Anyone stuck in vacation traffic with kids in tow can tell you that Space and Time have always been unified but not in the wiggly, abstract sense my buddy Al Einstein was talking about.

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