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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Stunned By Greek Plan For Bailout Referendum, Markets Drop

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou.

Yiannis Liakos AFP/Getty Images

"Markets plunged Tuesday on fears that Europe's plan to save the euro was already unraveling after the shock decision by Greek Prime Minister to call a referendum on the country's latest rescue," The Associated Press writes.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Hundreds Of Millions Missing From MF Global, 'New York Times' Reports

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 1:08 pm

Not only has MF Global had to file for bankruptcy protection, now there's this news about the securities firm run by former New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine (D):

The New York Times reports that:

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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Herman Cain Now Recalls 'Settlement' With Accuser

Republican presidential contender Herman Cain during an appearance at the American Enterprise Institute on Monday.

Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain was consistent Monday in saying he has "never sexually harassed anyone." But some parts of his response to a Politico report about past allegations had shifted by day's end.

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Strange News
6:08 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Liquor-Shop Shenanigans: A Nonagenarian And A Ghost

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 9:28 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with tales of British alcohol. The one stop shop in Essex refused to sell whiskey to Diane Taylor. She didn't have proper I.D., and the shop said rules are rules, even though she is 92. Ms. Taylor at least caused less trouble than the ghost supposedly inhabiting a pub in Birmingham, England. At Halloween, the ghost has smashed bottles of wine it didn't like. It's not clear why the staff thinks it's a ghost and not a customer. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:59 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Russia Encounters Glitch In Daylight Savings Switch

Transcript

Hard Times: A Journey Across America
4:34 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Calif. County Yearns For 'The Way It Used To Be'

Craig and Linda Black sit at a table in the yard of their home in Vacaville, Calif. They are desperately trying to hang on to their home after falling behind on their mortgage payments.

Richard Gonzales NPR

Part of a monthlong series

There's a lot to like about Solano County, Calif., a collection of bedroom communities between San Francisco and Sacramento: great climate, diversity and until recently, very stable neighborhoods.

But it also has the second-highest foreclosure rate in the country. Its largest city, Vallejo, went bankrupt. And unemployment here is 11 percent, higher than the national average.

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Monkey See
4:30 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Mindy Kaling On Diets, High School And Other American Pastimes

Mindy Kaling is an Emmy Award-nominated writer and an actress on NBC's The Office.

Autumn deWilde

Much of Mindy Kaling's humor is rooted in something that might seem unfeasible: using logic to explore American culture. But it works — and works well — because Kaling uses a type of circular logic that's all her own. Just consider this recent Tweet: "Can everyone buy my book please? I wanna quit the business and homeschool my kids real weird."

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Law
4:19 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Supreme Court To Weigh Case Of False Testimony

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in a case that sounds more like a John Grisham novel than a Supreme Court case.

The issue is whether police investigators have total immunity from being sued for giving false testimony before a grand jury. The case has all the elements of a spooky saga, involving power, influence and money — all used to silence the critics of Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital, the largest hospital in Albany, Ga.

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Latin America
3:54 am
Tue November 1, 2011

In The Hills Of Rio, Shantytowns Get A Makeover

Santa Marta is one of the many slums that dot the hillsides of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio, host of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016, is now trying to remake these slums, or favelas, long wracked by poverty and violence.

Vanderlei Almeida AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 8:23 pm

On a recent day in Rio de Janeiro, police radios crackle in Providencia, a warren of cinder-block homes and narrow walkways where drugs and violence were once common.

But these days, it's just routine chatter. All is safe in this favela, one of the hundreds of slums built chockablock on the city's steep hills. A Rio advertising company is leading a tour for its employees and representatives of other companies.

Among those who have come is Raoni Lotar, a 30-year-old Carioca — resident of Rio.

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Around the Nation
3:53 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Starbucks Hopes To Kick-Start Job Creation

Starbucks is teaming up with a network of community-based financial institutions to help create jobs. Beginning Tuesday anyone can make a tax-deductable contribution at a Starbucks store or online to the Create Jobs for USA Fund. The money will go to companies so they can hire or retain American workers.

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Law
3:52 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Official Admits 'Mistake' In Gun-Trafficking Case

U.S. Border Patrol vehicles drive from a checkpoint in December 2010, as teams of border officers comb the Arizona desert about 10 miles north of Mexico in search for a suspect in the fatal shooting of U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian Terry in the rugged terrain in Rio Rico, Ariz.

Ross D. Franklin ASSOCIATED PRESS

A top political appointee in the Obama Justice Department says he made a "mistake" when he didn't flag questionable tactics used by federal agents in a gun-trafficking case for his superiors last year.

Lanny A. Breuer, assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division, told NPR he found out in April 2010 that agents at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives had let more than 400 guns connected to suspicious buyers cross the Southwest border during the Bush years, but he didn't tell senior leadership at the Justice Department.

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7 Billion And Counting
3:46 am
Tue November 1, 2011

As Population, Consumption Rise, Builder Goes Small

The world's population has just hit 7 billion people and continues to grow. Population experts are concerned about the rise in consumption that will accompany the increase in people. One California home builder, ZETA Communities, designs and builds small, highly energy-efficient homes.

Zeta Communities

Originally published on Wed November 2, 2011 11:33 am

The planet may not feel any different today, but there are now 7 billion people on it, according to the United Nations.

That number will continue to rise, of course, and global incomes are likely to rise as well. That means more cars and computers, and bigger homes: the kinds of things Americans take for granted. It's that rise in consumption that has population experts worried.

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Africa
3:00 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Somali Militants Vow Payback For Kenya's Offensive

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 9:28 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Yet another foreign army has sent its troops into Somalia.

INSKEEP: Many years ago, American troops took positions there.

MONTAGNE: More recently, forces from neighboring Ethiopia, with U.S. backing, have moved against Islamist groups.

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Europe
3:00 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Greek Referendum Could Jeopardize Bailout Deal

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou says he will ask the public to vote in a referendum on last week's European debt deal. His surprise announcement could throw a wrench into the bailout agreement. The bankers holding Greek debt agreed to accept losses on Greek bonds on the assumption that the country would carry out austerity measures. For the latest, Steve Inskeep talks with reporter Joanna Kakissis in Athens.

Business
3:00 am
Tue November 1, 2011

MF Global A U.S. Casualty Of EU's Debt Crisis

MF Global, the securities firm run by former New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine, was forced to file for bankruptcy protection Monday. The company, at Corzine's urging, made big investments in European sovereign debt. Those bets turned out to be losers. Analysts don't believe MF Global is a harbinger of bad things to come. It was much more exposed to European debt than most U.S. financial companies. Zoe Chace reports for NPR's Planet Money.

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