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Sweetness And Light
9:00 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

The (Basketball) Show Must Go On

Fans who are tired of the NBA lockout can get some basketball entertainment from a new show, Lysistrata Jones, which opens on Broadway next month.

Carol Rosegg AP

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 7:44 am

For those of you desperately missing basketball during the NBA lockout, an antidote to your hoop pangs is on the way: A musical comedy about basketball will open for previews on Broadway on Nov. 12. It's called Lysistrata Jones and is based on the original Lysistrata, which, of course, was written by Aristophanes back in 411 B.C.

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The Two-Way
5:44 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Google Says Number Of Government Requests For User Info Jumps

Twice a year, Google releases aggregate data on requests it receives from governments across the world. It's part of a project they call "Transparency Report."

In its latest release, Google says the number of content removal requests it received from the United States increased by 70 percent from the previous six months. And the number of user data requests jumped by by 29 compared to the previous reporting period.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:32 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Flu Shots: Far from Perfect, Still Advised

What's in this vial changes from year to year, but the process of creating the flu vaccine remains pretty constant.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Flu shots are safe, cheap and pretty much universally recommended.

But how well do they really protect us from getting sick?

The most comprehensive review to date, just published online by The Lancet, suggests that flu vaccines aren't as effective as many of us have thought.

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Election 2012
5:03 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

The GOP Campaign Ad Wars, As Seen On YouTube

A new ad from Herman Cain features his campaign manager, Mark Block, taking a drag from a cigarette.

YouTube

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 9:29 pm

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Opinion
5:00 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Autumn Raspberries: Worth The Tantalizing Wait

When it comes to fine-tasting fruit, the art of patience can't be underestimated.

istockphoto.com

In a hurry-up world, the garden keeps its own time. Old-fashioned plants like raspberries, asparagus and rhubarb ask us to slow down and wait for the sweet reward they offer. Commentator Julie Zickefoose revels in the waiting.

I have a friend who lives up in the mountains of North Carolina who loves to give me wonderful plants. Usually Connie gives me native prairie plants, and I plop them in the meadow, and it's no big deal. But this year she gave me raspberries. Not just any raspberries. Golden raspberries.

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Planet Money
4:50 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Somebody Wants To Trademark 'Occupy Wall St.'

USPTO

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 1:32 pm

Of course:

Key quote from The Smoking Gun, which found the application and spoke to Robert Maresca, a former union ironworker whose wife applied for the trademark:

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Presidential Race
4:44 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

The Flat Tax Through The Decades

Last-minute income tax filer Jen Makowski works on her taxes at the main post office, April 15, 2004, in Chicago. Proponents of the flat tax argue it would make it easier for Americans to file their taxes.

Tim Boyle Getty Images

As Rick Perry unveils his flat tax plan, we take a look back at the history of the flat tax, from Abraham Lincoln to Steve Forbes to 9-9-9.

Business
4:34 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Entrepreneurship Lessons For The Academic-Minded

subject of a Nobel Prize last year.

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A pair of tweezers holds a graphene transistor fabricated on a silicon wafer. An I-Corps team from the University of Pennsylvania is working on scaling up their cheaper method of making high-quality graphene, an extremely strong, conductive material one atom thick that was the subject of a Nobel Prize last year.

Courtesy of Zhentang Luo

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 4:51 pm

The slow pace of job creation has revived interest in getting promising new technologies out of university labs and into the marketplace. At Stanford University, a group of academic researchers from all over the country gathered to take a crash course in how to turn their projects into startup companies.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

New $5.50 Tax For Canadians Flying To U.S. Called A 'Provocative Insult'

Oh! Canada!

S. Badz Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 4:58 pm

Canadians are not feeling very loved by the United States. The latest spat comes after the U.S. announced that any Canadian traveling to the country by air or boat will be charged a $5.50 tax.

The tax had been discussed and discarded before, but a new free-trade deal signed with Colombia prohibits tariff exemptions for travelers from Canada.

The sentiment in Canada is perhaps best captured by the headline in today's National Post:

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Rick Perry
4:13 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Perry Proposes Optional 20 Percent Flat Tax

Rick Perry doesn't have a catchy marketing slogan for his tax plan. But he's hoping the idea of a flat, 20 percent income tax rate will do for his campaign what "9-9-9" did for Herman Cain's.

"We need a tax code that unleashes growth instead of preventing it; that promotes fairness, not class warfare," Perry said during a speech at the ISO Poly Films factory Tuesday in Gray Court, S.C.

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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Gadhafi's Final Weeks, As Told By A Top Security Official

From the shaky, grainy video, we have an idea of what the last moments were like for Col. Moammar Gadhafi. But over the past few days, his top security official, who was captured along with Gadhafi, has been talking about the final weeks of one of the most notorious despots in modern history.

As Mansour Dao, who says he is also Gadhafi's cousin, puts it, Gadhafi left Tripoli on Aug. 18 or 19, before the rebels made a push for the capital city. He left to Sirte, what was a stronghold, and his son Saif al-Islam left for Bani Wald.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:22 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Employers May Not Rush To Drop Health Coverage After All

Despite claims to the contrary, a insightful economic analysis suggests that it wouldn't be in most employers' business interests to stop providing health insurance when the main coverage provisions of the federal health overhaul kick in.

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Asia
1:47 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Boom In Shadow Financing Exacts High Toll In China

At least 80 business owners have abandoned factories like this one in Wenzhou, China's entrepreneurial capital, because they have run up exorbitant debts to the city's loan sharks and underground lenders.

Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 7:26 pm

In recent weeks, at least 80 business owners have fled Wenzhou in eastern China and gone into hiding because they can't pay crushing debts to the city's empire of underground lending firms and loan sharks.

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao became so concerned that he flew to Wenzhou earlier in October to try to keep the problem from spreading.

The city's credit crisis highlights some of the flaws — and potential risks — of the banking system in the world's second-largest economy.

Business Owners Trapped By Debt

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NPR Story
1:21 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Political Biographies Often More Fact Than Fiction

Transcript

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Around the Nation
1:17 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Oregon School District Says No To Teacher Bonus Grant

Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Oregon earlier this month, and he heard from an Oregon City teacher who complained about the rules of a performance-based pay bonus grant.

Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 4:29 pm

An Oregon school district has rejected more than $2.5 million in federal funds. Oregon City — just south of Portland — turned down money that would have given performance-based pay bonuses to teachers, a controversial part of the Obama administration's education policy.

It's called the Teacher Incentive Fund, and it's meant to reward results. Oregon City actually applied for the money it's now turned down.

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