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11:01 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

'Gardener' Gives 'Heirloom Life' To Forgotten Flora

Yokohama squash was first introduced to North America around 1860 by James Hogg of Yorkville, N.Y. after his brother, Thomas, sent him the seeds from Japan.

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The Yokohama squash was first introduced to North America around 1860 by James Hogg of Yorkville, N.Y. after his brother, Thomas, sent him the seeds from Japan.

Jeremiah C. Gettle and Emilee Freie Gettle Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Co. LLC

As a child growing up on his family's farm in the 1980s, Jere Gettle didn't spend his evenings watching TV; instead, he read seed catalogs. To him, the endless varieties of seeds with exotic sounding names were full of possibility. He loved the idea of planting them in the ground, tending the crops that grew from them and preparing the harvested vegetables for a family meal.

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Economy
11:01 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Does The Economy Need A Little Inflation?

Though most central bankers hate inflation, policies that promote inflation may boost the U.S. economy, some economists say.

Ken Rogoff, former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, says the Federal Reserve's efforts to boost growth haven't worked and the central bank needs to be more forceful.

"They need to be willing, in fact actively pursue, letting inflation rise a bit more," says Rogoff, who is now a professor at Harvard. "That would encourage consumption. It would encourage investment. It would bring housing prices into line."

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Rick Perry
11:01 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

For Rick Perry, A Restless Life On The Farm

Rick Perry's parents still live on Farm Market Road 618.

Don Gonyea NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:21 am

Second in a series

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The Two-Way
6:06 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

U.S. Tells California's Pot Shops To Close Down, Or Face Charges

Jars full of medical marijuana are seen at a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles. U.S. attorneys sent letters telling more than a dozen of the shops to shut down.

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Pot dispensaries have flourished in California, one of 16 states where the use of medical marijuana is legal. But the federal government is now giving some of the state's pot shops 45 days to close down.

The state's four U.S. attorneys gave notice to at least 16 stores that they must close, or face criminal charges and the seizure of their property, according to the Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
4:45 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Dwarf-Tossing, Long Banned, May Return In Florida

State Rep. Ritch Workman, seen here speaking in 2010, has filed a bill to make dwarf tossing legal once again in Florida.

Mark Foley Fla. House of Representatives

News that a Florida legislator wants to bring back the banned activity of "dwarf tossing" has people shaking their heads, and wondering why in the world you would want to do something like that. Of course, they're also curious as to whether he'll succeed.

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Asia
4:23 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Something's Fishy About Chinese Hairy Crabs

Hairy crabs are extremely popular in China. These were in a market in the eastern province of Jiangsu.

China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 9:57 am

Fake products permeate nearly every corner of China's economy. Earlier this year, the trend seemed to reach a new low when phony Apple stores were exposed in southwestern China.

Each fall, the fakery even extends to the world of seafood and East China's Yangcheng Lake, which is just a short train ride from Shanghai. Yangcheng is home to what are reputed to be China's tastiest and most expensive hairy crabs.

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Latin America
3:50 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

U.S. Troops Increase Aid To Mexico In Drug War

A Mexican soldier carries a marijuana plant that was found on a large plantation in Baja California state, near the border with the U.S., on July 15. The U.S. military has been stepping up its assistance to Mexico in the fight against drug cartels.

Antonio Nava AFP/Getty Images

MEXICO CITY — When a young corporal in the Mexican marines was ambushed by drug cartel gunmen in the state of Tamaulipas, his first thoughts were for his pregnant wife and unborn child.

But within a split second, he was focused on combat, as his unit took defensive positions around their convoy to return fire.

They managed to shoot dead four attackers while only suffering two injuries.

The victory — one of many by Mexico's marines — was helped largely by U.S.-supplied equipment and training with the U.S. Northern Command in Colorado.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:33 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Despite His Public Prominence, Jobs Waged Health Battle Privately

Three file photos, from left, Jan. 2010, July 2010 and Oct. 2010, show Apple CEO Steve Jobs. ON Â Jan. 17, 2011, Jobs took a medical leave of absence for the second time in two years.

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 10:36 am

Even now, after Steve Jobs' death, there's more we don't know about his health problems than we do know.

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The Two-Way
3:03 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Banned U.S. Sprinter Wins Olympics Appeal; Other Cases May Follow

LaShawn Merritt crosses the finish line first, in the men's 4x400-meter relay at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea, Sept. 2. Once banned for doping, Merritt has been cleared to run in London next summer.

Mark Dadswell Getty Images

The International Olympic Committee says it will fight a court's decision that overturns its rule barring athletes suspended for doping from the next Olympics. The rule, which applied to anyone suspended for more than six months, was challenged by U.S. sprinter LaShawn Merritt, with the support of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

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Remembrances
2:07 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Derrick Bell, Influential Legal Scholar, Dies At 80

Derrick Bell, the first tenured black professor at Harvard Law School, died of cancer Wednesday. He is seen here in 2002.

Graham Jepson AP

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 5:54 pm

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Mitt Romney
2:04 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

2 Portraits Emerge Of Mitt Romney The Businessman

Mitt Romney, shown in 1993, is the former CEO of Bain & Co. In the 1980s, he started an investment fund called Bain Capital. His supporters say that's where he learned to solve big problems, create jobs and expand companies. His opponents say he made money by shutting down factories, occasionally driving companies into bankruptcy.

David L. Ryan Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 1:01 pm

First in a series

In the late 1970s, recently out of Harvard Business School, Mitt Romney went to work for the Boston consulting firm Bain & Co. He was successful, but he says his dream was always to run his own business.

In 1984, he got the chance.

The firm's founder asked Romney to start an investment fund called Bain Capital. The company would put money into small or struggling businesses, help them grow, and then Bain would cash out.

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Technology
2:03 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

With No Steve Jobs, Will Apple Lose Its Juice?

In June, Steve Jobs spoke at a Cupertino City Council meeting to show off his plan for a new headquarters. Even though he was looking quite unwell, he still knew all of the project's details.

AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:21 am

The tech world is mourning Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday from complications of pancreatic cancer. Even as the tributes roll in, it's hard to avoid this nagging question: What will become of Apple without its charismatic co-founder?

Jobs rescued Apple from near bankruptcy and turned it into one of America's most important companies — and one of its biggest. Now, Apple is trying to keep the Jobs magic alive.

A Knack For Detail

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Politics
2:02 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Consumer Protection Iffy, Despite Nominee Approval

Richard Cordray was approved by the Senate Banking Committee to head the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. But Senate Republicans have vowed to filibuster nominees if there aren't changes to the agency.

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

President Obama said Thursday that Bank of America and other financial institutions are using new consumer protections as an excuse to charge new fees.

"I mean, basically the argument they've made is, 'Well, you know what, this hidden fee was prohibited, and so we'll find another hidden fee to make up for it,' " he said at a news conference.

What could help consumers? The new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Obama says. The Senate Banking Committee on Thursday approved his nominee to head the new consumer advocacy agency.

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Law
2:01 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Holder Takes Heat Over 'Fast And Furious' Scandal

Old hands in Washington know it's never a good sign when the president of the United States has to make a statement like this one.

"I have complete confidence in Attorney General Holder, in how he handles his office," President Obama told reporters at a news conference Thursday. "He has been very aggressive in going after gun running and cash transactions that are going to these transnational drug cartels."

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The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

TCU Bolts Big East To Stay Closer To Home In Big 12

With its jump to the Big 12 conference, Texas Christian University continues a game of musical chairs in college sports.

Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 4:11 pm

With college sports conferences realigning themselves as if they were inspired by the Human Centipede horror films, another twist has emerged today, with Texas Christian University opting to leave the Big East — a conference it had not yet formally joined — in favor of the Big 12.

The move is sure to unsettle the Big East, which has already lost Syracuse and Pittsburgh to the Atlantic Coast Conference. There are also rumblings that the University of Connecticut is interested in leaving for the ACC, as well.

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