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Behind The War On Terror's Dark Curtain

Sep 11, 2011

On Sept. 12, 2001, Ali H. Soufan, a special agent with the FBI, was handed a secret file. Soufan had spent nearly a decade investigating terrorism cases, like the bombing of the U.S.S. Cole. He says that this file was one he had requested before the attacks, and that had it been given to him earlier it may have helped to prevent them.

It's been said many times, today: that one of Sept. 11's most significant legacy are the two wars still being fought the by the United States. Perhaps, that's why this set of pictures feels so important. It shows American service members commemorating the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 in simple terms: raising an American flag or bowing in prayer:

It seems there are two types of stories about how children who experienced Sept. 11: First, of course, there are the stories about the children who lost parents on that day, and then there are those who are too young to remember what life was like before the attacks.

NPR's Zoe Chace talked to some of those kids in New York. She filed this report:

Kate Bralauer is 11. She's from Manhattan, she's never seen the skyline with the towers in it. But 9/11 matters to her.

Update at 6:50 p.m: Nerves are on edge for the nation's travelers on the 10th Anniversary of Sept. 11. And authorities are taking any perceived threat very seriously. On two different occasions today, suspicious passengers caused authorities to spring into action.

First two jets were scrambled to escort a New York bound filight, then NORAD scrambled two more jets to escort a flight headed to Detroit.

Our Original post:

It took journalist and author William Langewiesche several days to get to ground zero after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The airports were closed, and he lived in California.

But as soon as he arrived, he and his editors at the Atlantic Monthly began frantically trying to gain access to the highly restricted site where the Twin Towers had stood.

Langewiesche contacted the head of an obscure city agency, the Department of Design and Construction, Kenneth Holden.

John Ashcroft's term as attorney general under George W. Bush was redefined by Sept. 11.

And he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that the techniques endorsed by his Justice Department were necessary, from warrantless wiretaps to so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques."

Defending The Patriot Act

One of Ashcroft's most controversial legacies is the Patriot Act, a piece of legislation that dramatically expanded the surveillance capabilities of law enforcement for monitoring terrorism suspects.

Honoring The Four-Legged Heroes

Sep 11, 2011

NPR's Joel Rose was in New Jersey today, where he stumbled upon another Sept. 11 tribute:

A different breed of heroes from September 11th gathered across the Hudson River from Ground Zero. Dozens of service and therapy dogs from around the country gathered with their handlers at Liberty State Park. The event, billed as "Finding One Another," was intended to celebrate the contributions of search and rescue dogs on 9/11 and since.

Gadhafi's Son Found In Niger, Officials Say

Sep 11, 2011

Officials in the North African nation of Niger said Sunday that one of Moammar Gadhafi's sons had fled across the Libyan border into their country.

Niger's justice minister, Marou Amadou, told reporters that Saadi Gadhafi was intercepted by local troops after he entered the country through Libya's southern desert border as part of a convoy.

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Brendan Banaszak tells us that at Ground Zero, families of those killed there are already turning the new memorial into a quiet place of remembrance.)

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's another musical moment from the ceremony in New York.

Singer-songwriter Paul Simon performed his classic "The Sound of Silence."

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Joel Rose tells us of an early morning service in New Jersey.)

Across the Hudson River from the World Trade Center, hundreds of people gathered on the New Jersey waterfront for a ceremony to honor the residents of Jersey City who died 10 years ago today.

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's something quiet.

A short time ago at the memorial service in New York, cellist Yo-Yo Ma performed Sarabande from Bach's First Suite for Cello Solo.

At 8:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush addressed the nation about that day's tragic events. Here's what he said:

Today was a day of mourning for the country. The 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 was marked by prayers, solemn ceremonies, vows to remember the victims and pledges to never let terrorists fundamentally change the American way of life.

A truck bombing at an American base in eastern Afghanistan late Saturday killed two Afghan civilians — one of them a 3-year-old girl — and wounded nearly 80 U.S. military personnel, The Associated Press reports.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility.

According to the AP:

Although thousands of miles from ground zero, San Diego's Muslim community drew attention after Sept. 11, 2001. Two of the hijackers lived there. They also prayed at a local mosque, where noted radical imam Anwar al-Awlaki preached. Recently, several men from the Somali community were arrested and charged with aiding a terrorist group.

A local imam has been working to open dialogue between Muslims and the larger community in part to combat the suspicion that arose after the local ties came to light.

The Department of Homeland Security and state governments spend billions of dollars every year on domestic security, helping cities and counties buy up-to-date equipment and strategies for defeating terrorists.

At least 77 U.S. soldiers were wounded and five Afghan civilians killed when a truck bomb targeted a base west of Kabul.

Saturday's attack shaved the facades from shops outside the Combat Outpost Sayed Abad in Wardak province and broke windows in government offices nearby, said Roshana Wardak, a former parliamentarian who runs a clinic in the nearby town of the same name.

Wardak province borders the Afghan capital, Kabul, but is considered to be partially under the control of the Taliban, which claimed responsibility for the attack.

No company suffered on Sept. 11 as much as the bond broker Cantor Fitzgerald, which lost 658 people. One of the few employees to survive that day was Lauren Manning, who was in the lobby of the World Trade Center's North Tower when the first plane hit.

Manning had been rushing to an elevator and was instantly engulfed in flames that came into the lobby, leaving her with burns on more than 80 percent of her body.

The terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, have been pegged as the moment that changed everything for Americans. Nothing was supposed to be the same after the attacks, and it was expected to usher in a new era for America.

Writer George Packer remembers having a moment of optimism.

Memorial To Flight 93 Dedicated In Pa.

Sep 10, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

GUY RAZ, host: We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Christian Adams. Lorraine G. Bay.

Corporate Taxes: How Low Can You Go?

Sep 10, 2011

The idea that America's 35 percent corporate tax rate is stifling U.S. economic growth is almost an article of faith among some politicians.

The sound bites from Republican presidential debates to campaign stops are basically interchangeable: "We need to bring that corporate tax rate down."

But in fact, very few corporations pay taxes on 35 percent of their profits. With the help of complex international tax loopholes, some companies manage to pay almost no corporate tax at all.

'Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich'

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, reshaped the U.S. foreign policy agenda, says Doug Feith, who was undersecretary of defense for policy in the Bush administration.

He sees the top two goals of that new agenda as achieved: preventing future attacks and disrupting terror networks. But he says the U.S. failed on the other goal: countering ideological support for terrorism.

Millions of people, including my children, have been born since Sept. 11, 2001. This year, I find myself wondering how to tell them about that day and those that followed. Maybe the most we can hope for is to pass on a few memories of New York then.

All of the photographs that sprouted on lampposts and walls — smiling faces snapped on vacations and joyous occasions, suddenly underscored with wrenching, urgent words, and question marks that pierced like hooks:

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Letters: FEMA, Boise, Quotations

Sep 10, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, host: Time now for your letters.

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As Election Nears, Jobs Are First Priority

Sep 10, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, host: Joined now by NPR's Andrea Seabrook.

Thanks for being with us.

ANDREA SEABROOK: Great to be here, Scott.

SIMON: And remind us now the main details of President Obama's proposal and characterize his speech for us.

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