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A bone from a human ancestor that died between 1.8 million and 1.6 million years ago shows evidence of cancer, a newly published study finds. It is the oldest known example of a malignant tumor in a human ancestor.

While many are calling this election a bitter contest, one Philadelphia business has found a sweet side to the electoral process — by reviving a patriotic tradition dating back centuries: clear toy candies.

Made of sugar, water and maybe a little coloring boiled to the correct temperature, then poured into elaborate molds, clear toy candies are a Pennsylvania tradition. With the Democratic convention in town this week, Philadelphia's renowned clear candy maker, Shane Confectionery, is putting out these sweet sculptures with a political theme.

Flour seems innocuous. We've long been warned to wash our hands after handling chicken, and to cook our hamburgers well. We wash lettuce that came straight from the field. But really, flour?

This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reminded everyone that flour is, in fact, a raw, uncooked food, just like those fresh greens. Yes, it can make you sick.

Russian and Syria have said they are opening humanitarian corridors out of besieged, rebel-held areas in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo. But NPR has reached civilians in the embattled city who turned back for fear of the ongoing shelling.

In a big hotel conference room near New York's Times Square, six doctors huddle around a greasy piece of raw pork. They watch as addiction medicine specialist Michael Frost delicately marks the meat, incises it and implants four match-sized rods.

"If you can do it well on the pork, you can easily do it on the person," Frost tells his audience.

Conventions are go-time for lobbyists and advocates

Jul 28, 2016
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D Gorenstein

It's easy to think political conventions are all about the speeches and the pageantry and the sign-waving, but they're also a business opportunity.

A great chance for lobbyists to come and schmooze with decision makers trapped in one convenient location.

Suzanne Ffolkes is Vice President of Communications at Research!America, a nonpartisan group that advocates for medical and scientific research.

The organization lobbies and educates Congress on behalf of academia, patient advocacy groups, research institutions and major companies.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine introduced himself to America Wednesday night as a fighter, Hillary Clinton's ally and — a dad. Not just a dad to his own children but everybody's dad.

To start, he doesn't speak like a politician.

"Can I be honest with you about something?" Kaine said, "Can I be honest with you about something? I never expected to be here." He talked about his midwestern upbringing, and his own union father dad.

Boeing may retire the 747

Jul 28, 2016
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Ashley Milne-Tyte

Boeing just released earnings results, and it announced its first quarterly loss in almost seven years. Write-downs related to new planes were responsible for much of that, but then the company slipped another piece of news into a regulatory filing.

Boeing said it may stop making the iconic 747 aircraft. Yes, the original jumbo jet may finally be phased out after 45 years of service. Airlines just aren’t buying it – or any other large plane – like they used to.

A 1969 PanAm ad captured the marvel people felt at the first huge passenger jet.

A day after shocking the political and foreign policy establishments on both sides of the aisle with a call for Russia to hack into Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's email, Republican nominee Donald Trump now says he was being "sarcastic."

Less than 24 hours earlier, Trump said he would welcome Russian hackers releasing any emails they could "find" from the private email server Clinton used while serving as secretary of state.

Maybe it was a meteor? Or space junk? People on the West Coast weren't sure what the bright object was that streaked across the sky Wednesday night, but they knew it was spectacular. Now comes word that the object — which separated into bright fragments — was a stage of China's large new rocket.

After Hinckley, States Tightened Use Of The Insanity Plea

Jul 28, 2016

The insanity ruling that sent President Ronald Reagan's would-be assassin John Hinckley, Jr., to a government psychiatric hospital rather than prison was handed down 34 years ago, but its repercussions still affect hundreds, if not thousands, of people who commit a crime and also have mental illness.

A group of nano-scientists has discovered a way to arrange individual atoms to store and rewrite data 500 times more efficiently than the best hard drives on the market.

The Missouri Gaming Commission is preparing to oversee daily fantasy sports websites under a new law passed this year.  

House Bill 1941, signed last month by Gov. Jay Nixon, takes effect Aug. 28, but its provisions still have to go through a public comment period before they become permanent next spring. 

Amid two troubling investigations at the University of Louisville, school President James Ramsey resigned Wednesday. The university is facing scrutiny over separate scandals that involve allegations of financial misdeeds and sex parties for athletes.

Times are tough for Chesapeake oysters.

For one thing, they used to be bigger. "If you look at what people were saying back in the 1600s and 1700s about oysters, people had to cut them in half before they could even eat them," says Denise Breitburg, an ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

The third night of the 2016 Democratic convention scaled several major peaks: President Obama gave, perhaps, the best-written oration of his career. Vice President Joe Biden gave, perhaps, his last national convention address, and his prospective successor, Tim Kaine, gave his first.

America's first image of Chelsea Clinton was as a curly-haired preteen girl with braces who shied away from the public stage while her father was president in the 1990s.

More than two decades later, the now 36-year-old mother of two will voluntarily step into the spotlight to introduce her own mother as her family seeks a return to the White House.

There's a new book out about the student loan crisis, or what author Sandy Baum suggests is a "bogus crisis." Baum, a financial aid expert and senior fellow at the Urban Institute, claims it has been manufactured by the media in search of a spicy story and fueled by politicians pushing "debt free college" proposals.

We had a few questions for Baum about the book, Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education.

Hillary Rodham's 1969 commencement address at Wellesley College did not stand out because of what she said.

It stood out because of how she said it, and because she said it at all. This is a story not about words, but about context.

Before 1969, Wellesley had never had a student speaker at commencement. Administrators spoke and special guests spoke, but students at this women's college didn't have a voice on graduation day.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

What Women Need In A Checkup: Test Less, Talk More

Jul 28, 2016

Healthy young women can be forgiven for being confused about how often they're supposed to be getting into see their primary care doctor.

President Obama addressed the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Wednesday night. The following is a transcript:


Twelve years ago tonight, I addressed this convention for the very first time.

An evening of seersucker and 'malarkey'

Jul 27, 2016
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Kim Adams, Nancy Marshall-Genzer, Andrea Seabrook, Gina Delvac and Bridget Bodnar

Day three of the DNC served as a rebuttal to the pessimistic tone present at the RNC last week. President Barack Obama said that Americans embrace the future, rather than fear it, while Vice President Joe Biden described Donald Trump's ability to empathize with the middle class "a bunch of malarkey." Secretary Hillary Clinton also made a surprise appearance, sharing the stage with Obama. Plus, we asked convention attendees some questions from our listeners.

As he takes the stage Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine is firmly in Hillary Clinton's camp — and his party's — on the big health care issues. Now a U.S. senator from Virginia, Kaine supports the Affordable Care Act and pushed its Medicaid expansion. He also worked to overhaul the mental health system when he was governor of Virginia.

Here are highlights and a few flashpoints of controversy from Kaine's health policy record:

Mental health

For decades, Japanese fishermen have told stories about the existence of a dark, rare beaked whale that they called karasu — the "raven."

But now, scientists say they have genetic proof to back up these tales. Long mistaken for its relative, the Baird's beaked whale, scientists say it represents an entirely new species.

Democrats called on Americans to reject what they called the politics of fear and division of the GOP and elect Hillary Clinton during the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

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