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Eyeing fast-growing urban and suburban markets where demand for health care services is outstripping supply, some health care systems are opening tiny, full-service hospitals with comprehensive emergency services but often fewer than a dozen inpatient beds.

National security was front and center during the Republican National Convention's first night of programming.

Speaker after speaker bashed President Obama and his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, for the Obama administration's approach to fighting ISIS, immigration policies, and the 2012 attacks on diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya.

Here are the facts and context behind several high-profile claims in Monday's speeches.

Big data has been considered an essential tool for tech companies and political campaigns. Now, someone who's handled data analytics at the highest levels in both of those worlds sees promise for it in policing, education and city services.

For example, data can show that a police officer who's been under stress after responding to cases of domestic abuse or suicide may be at higher risk of a negative interaction with the public, data scientist Rayid Ghani says.

For its entire five-year existence, the nation of South Sudan has had a U.N. peacekeeping force. In a long-anticipated move, African leaders have now approved a request to send a regional peacekeeping force to the country, as well.

The news emerged from the African Union Summit that was held recently in Kigali, Rwanda. The U.N. force in South Sudan currently numbers around 12,000 troops.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports for our Newscast unit:

In the summertime, the air is thick with the low humming of bees delivering pollen from one flower to the next. If you listen closely, a louder buzz may catch your ear.

Members of the Wichita, Kan., police department spent Sunday afternoon eating and talking with people from the community, at a cookout that was planned with the local Black Lives Matter group.

The event was called the First Steps Community Cookout — a reference to its goal of bridging the gap between police and the community they serve. Taking place instead of a protest that had been planned for Sunday, the cookout came about after Wichita Police Chief Gordon Ramsay had a lengthy meeting with activist A.J. Bohannon and other members of the local Black Lives Matter movement.

On today's show, we'll talk about investors who putting their money into automated indices; how golf courses in Arizona make ends meet in the heat; and the rise in Nintendo's worth to more than $42 billion. 

After an unconventional and then emotional opening day, the 2016 Republican National Convention will turn to Republican leadership and Donald Trump's children as it makes the case to "Make America Work Again."

Earlier in the day, around 5 p.m. ET, state delegates will formally nominate Trump and Gov. Mike Pence.

CLEVELAND – Missouri Republicans are increasingly optimistic that presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump could offer a boon, not a bust, for the GOP’s entire statewide ticket in November.

“The worst poll I’ve seen has him eight points up in Missouri,’’ said U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, as she mingled Monday with Missouri delegates. “The best poll has him up 12.”

That’s among the reasons Wagner dismisses the last-minute effort by some anti-Trump delegates — mainly in other states — who are seeking a rules change to allow them to vote for somebody else.

Both our current president and the presumptive Democratic nominee have talked a lot about expanding early childhood education. President Obama has backed up his rhetoric by creating Preschool Development Grants.

As Donald Trump had promised, there were surprises Monday night at the opening of his personally programmed Republican National Convention — and some of them might have surprised even him.

Let's take a quick look at what went right and what did not:

The big hits of the night were former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Melania Trump. Their speeches were polar opposites but each lit up the convention hall. Yet each was marred as well.

When Sarah Gardner was 34, she started getting worried about whether she'd ever have a baby. So she took a test that aims to measure a woman's fertility.

The results terrified her. They indicated she had the fertility of a woman a decade older — a woman in her mid-40s.

"I was devastated," Gardner says. The news hit her especially hard because she was in the midst of breaking up with her longtime boyfriend.

The recent targeted attacks on police in Dallas and Baton Rouge have law enforcement on edge. Some departments are telling officers to patrol in pairs when possible, and to be extra vigilant about possible ambush.

Complicating matters is the question of how to interpret and react to the presence of a gun. With more Americans now exercising their legal right to carry firearms, police find themselves having to make rapid judgments about whether an armed citizen is a threat.

How golf courses beat the heat

Jul 19, 2016
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John Jenkins

For a lot of the country, this is peak season for the golfing industry. But in the Southwest, it’s just the opposite. High temperatures keep golfers off the links, while water and upkeep costs strain maintenance budgets. In Arizona, courses take different approaches to make ends meet.

At the Tournament Players Club (TPC) in Scottsdale, it’s noon and the temperature on the first tee is 105 degrees.

Fiat Chrysler faces federal investigation

Jul 19, 2016
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Lane Wallace

Fiat Chrysler, the Italian car company that produces Ram and Jeep, is under scrutiny from the U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission, according to news reports. The investigations come after a lawsuit filed in January 2016 alleging the company bribed dealers to falsely boost sales numbers.

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Dr. John

On a recent afternoon in downtown Chicago, Paul Dailing stood before a dozen tourists wearing comfortable shoes and posed a question: “Who wants to spend three hours getting depressed about governance?”

Dailing is the creator of one of the city’s hottest new attractions, the Chicago Corruption Walking Tour.

He told the group he could barely keep up with current events, and warned, “[The tour] is not in any capacity going to be comprehensive.”

Everyone will pay more to protect police officers

Jul 19, 2016
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Andy Uhler

Police in Boston, Los Angeles, Chicago and other cities are taking extra precautions as a result of fatal attacks on officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge. The New York Police Department said its officers will patrol in pairs for the foreseeable future.

Ronnie Lowenstein, director of New York City’s Independent Budget Office, said, as a result, they're expecting an increase in overtime.

“We will see that, if it does, show up in the numbers over the next few months,” she said.

But she also said it’s too early to know if extra patrol officers will mean more overtime.

Summer vacations: We wait for them all year. We pour time, energy and money into planning them. Expectations can run unreasonably high.

On this week's show, a summer edition of Stopwatch Science with Daniel Pink that explores what social science research has to say about vacations: How to make them better and what pitfalls to avoid.

Stopwatch Science

Spacefaring Stamp Sets World Record

Jul 18, 2016

A postage-paid space voyage!

An interplanetary "Ha!"

Or, maybe just a postal metaphor writ large.

However you phrase it, a 29-cent stamp has boldly reached Pluto and then some, making it the farthest-traveling postage stamp, according to the Guinness World Records organization.

The first night of the Republican National Convention is focused on national security, with presumptive nominee Donald Trump designating the theme as "Make America Safe Again."

Feds Investigate Fiat Chrysler Over Car Sales

Jul 18, 2016

U.S. federal authorities are investigating Fiat Chrysler over allegations that it encouraged dealers to falsely report the number of cars sold, the automaker confirmed Monday.

In a statement, the company said it was cooperating with a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation and that the numbers in its financial statements were based on shipments to dealers, not on sales to customers.

What happens after a failed coup?

Jul 18, 2016
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Kenan Gurbuz 

Just days after a failed military coup, Turkey is attempting to revert back to normal, at least during the day.

But at night, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s supporters keep marching in the streets, just as he asked them to.

They “wave flags, chant slogans and come out in thousands to the central squares of Istanbul and Ankara,” says Zia Weise, a journalist in Istanbul, Turkey's cultural center and largest city.

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Osman Orsal/Reuters

US fighter pilots fly their missions against Islamic State militants from a location in Turkey. Usually. But on Saturday, the skies over Turkey's Incirlik air base were empty.

A knife and ax attack on a train in Germany has left several people seriously injured.

The attacker was a 17-year-old Afghan, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson reports, citing Joachim Herrmann, interior minister of Bavaria, who was interviewed on the German public broadcaster ARD.

Herrmann says the attacker fled the train and was fatally shot by special forces troops who happened to be in the area and were able to quickly deploy to the site.

There was "no clear reason" for the attack, Herrmann says.

It's a warm and muggy summer afternoon in Chicago, but that doesn't seem to bother the kids clamoring to ride the Ferris wheel, the Rock-O-Plane and other carnival rides set up in this southwest suburban park.

At the annual Chicago Fraternal Order of Police summer picnic, city cops and their families hauled in coolers and set up grills to enjoy food and bond with brothers and sisters in blue.

But there's something hanging over this picnic: the stress and strain of the job, and the scrutiny that many here say is harsher than ever.

After a man attacked several law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, La., on Sunday, killing three of them, Baton Rouge Chief of Police Carl Dabadie said the attack demonstrated the need for so-called "militarized tactics" by local police forces.

The shooting involved a man armed with two long rifles and a handgun, police said at a press conference Monday. He appeared to be seeking out officers, officials say, describing the attack as an "ambush" and an "assassination."

He was killed by a member of a SWAT team firing from more than 100 yards away, police officials say.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Thousands of police officers have been suspended in Turkey following an attempted coup over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with security analyst Jim Walsh about what instability in that country could mean for the rest of the world, as well as what we’re learning about the recent terrorist attack in Nice, France.

Interview Highlights: Jim Walsh

On how the international community is reacting to the attempted Turkish coup:

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