Abbie Fentress Swanson

Reporter

Abbie Fentress Swanson joined Harvest Public Media in 2012 and is based at KBIA Radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before that, she covered arts and culture for WNYC Radio in New York. There she was part of a team that won an Online News Association award in 2012 and an Associated Press award in 2010 for outstanding digital news coverage. In 2011, she won the Garden State Journalists Association "Best Radio Feature" award for "Music Therapy Helps Vets Control Symptoms of PTSD." Reporting fellowships prior to WNYC took her to Egypt, Jordan, Qatar, India, Germany, the Czech Republic and Belgium. Abbie's travels led to multimedia stories on a wide range of subjects -- from the World Cup in South Africa, to the gay rights movement in India, to San Francisco's immigration court. She's filed stories for The New York Times, The Patriot Ledger, KALW Public Radio, The World, and Virginia Quarterly Review. Abbie holds a master's degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley and a bachelor's degree in Italian studies from the College of William & Mary. Check her out on twitter @dearabbie.

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Agriculture
11:18 am
Thu December 6, 2012

Can you make any money raising organic beef in Missouri? [infographic]

Credit Scott Pham / KBIA

In Tebbetts, Mo., JJR Family Farm raised USDA-certified organic livestock without antibiotics or genetically-modified feed.  After six years of raising and selling organic beef, they decided it was just too expensive to keep the certification.  Rancher John Rice helped us figure out just how much it costs to raise organic beef in Missouri.  

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Agriculture
10:15 am
Thu December 6, 2012

How much is organic certification worth?

Schnuck’s produce manager Dave Guthrie says the store only carried two kinds of this organicgirl product back in 1995. Now, due to customer demand, they carry eight varieties of the organic Salinas County, Calif. greens.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

The organic farming industry is booming. Since the U.S. Department of Agriculture launched its federal organic certification program in 2002, the number of organic farms has more than doubled. U.S. organic food sales have also grown from $1 billion in 1990 to $31.5 billion in 2011, according to the Organic Trade Association.  

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Agriculture
10:12 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Agriculture Sec. Vilsack: Farm Bill expiration affects exports

Ed Greiman, a cattle producer near Garner, Iowa, checks on his silage in this file photo.
Clay Masters for Harvest Public Media

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s latestOutlook for U.S. Agricultural Trade,” which was published on Nov. 29, forecasts American farm exports increasing and predicts they will come in at $145 billion in 2013. That's a 50 percent increase from 2009.

Such a high export number gave me pause, since the USDA is also predicting that in the coming year U.S. corn exports will be at a 40-year low because of a domestic corn shortfall caused by the drought.

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Agriculture
4:00 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Field Notes: Bearing witness to the Dust Bowl

Residents of Liberal, Kan. pose in gas masks in front of a Red Cross building in 1935. The masks were worn to protect their lungs from fine particles of blowing dust.
Courtesy kansasmemory.org, Kansas Historical Society

This is the latest installment of Harvest Public Media’s Field Notes, in which reporters talk to newsmakers and experts about important issues related to agriculture and food production.

For this edition of Field Notes, Harvest Public Media's Grant Gerlock spoke with Dayton Duncan, who wrote and co-produced the film "The Dust Bowl," which was directed by Ken Burns.

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Agriculture
3:11 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

Drought spells tough times for US corn exporters

This 20-barge flotilla will be pushed by Ingram towboats from the Upper Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico before the corn and soybeans in the cover-top barges and the metallic ore and shredded rubber in the open barges will be exported overseas.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

While the U.S. remains the world’s biggest supplier of corn, American farmers will lose a portion of the global corn market this year.

The Midwest drought devastated the normally robust corn harvest, which has led to higher corn prices and plummeting corn stocks. In a normal year, the U.S. exports more than 1 billion bushels of corn to markets worldwide, but with low domestic supply it’s a tough year for corn exporters – the USDA predicts U.S. corn exports will be at a 40-year low this year.

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Around the Nation
5:52 am
Tue November 20, 2012

Drought Hurts U.S. Grain Exporters, Market Share

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now for today's business bottom line. Last summer's drought has brought bad news this fall - low crop yields, especially of corn; plus higher prices, and a prediction from the Department of Agriculture that corn exports will be at a 40-year low. The U.S. still is the world's biggest supplier of corn. But this year, American exporters won't be quite as dominant as usual, in the global corn market. From Missouri, Abbie Fentress Swanson reports on the impact this is having.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Agriculture
3:15 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Barging in on a global story

Harvest Public Media reporter Abbie Fentress Swanson pauses on the fourth floor of a tug pushing a load that's almost a quarter mile long down the Mississippi River.
Photo taken by Ed Henleben

I left my house in Columbia, Mo., at 5:30 a.m. Thursday to make it to the Ingram Barge Co.'s Upper Mississippi River office by 8:30 am. I knew the three-hour drive had been worth it when I pulled up to the barge company’s office because the sturdy grey structure actually sits IN the Mighty Mississippi. I walked across an anchor barge that doubles as a pedestrian bridge to enter the office and passed by the R. Clayton McWhorter, a 45-foot tall, 140-foot long towboat with four decks.

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Agriculture
3:54 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Corn Belt Farmland: The Newest Real Estate Bubble?

This field is part of a 160-acre tract in Saline County, Mo., that sold for $10,700 per acre in February — double what it would have gone for five years ago.
Abby Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 5:02 pm

Howard Audsley has been driving through Missouri for the past 30 years to assess the value of farmland. Barreling down the flat roads of Saline County on a recent day, he stopped his truck at a 160-acre tract of newly tilled black land. The land sold in February for $10,700 per acre, double what it would have gone for five years ago.

Heading out into the field, Audsley picked up a clod of the dirt that makes this pocket of land some of the priciest in the state.

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Agriculture
11:25 am
Wed November 7, 2012

Will the defeat of Prop 37 lead to a national food labeling push?

A poster in support of Prop 37.
Nuclear Winter/flickr

California voters defeated Proposition 37 [PDF] on Tuesday night, the ballot measure that would have required labels to indicate the presence of genetically modified foods. At the polls, 53 percent of Californians voted against the proposition, while 47 percent voted for it. 

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Agriculture
12:27 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

South American farmers may benefit from US drought

With U.S. corn prices high thanks to the drought, some buyers are looking elsewhere for corn.
Rastoney/Flickr

Corn prices hit record highs this past August when they soared to over $8 a bushel, in large part because the drought hammering U.S. farms decimated corn stocks. Such prices were a windfall for Midwest farmers who actually had corn to sell. But could high corn prices hurt farmers if they drive buyers looking for cheaper grain and feed to South American farms?

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Agriculture
1:30 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Investors angle for a piece of precious farmland

This field is part of a 160-acre tract in Saline County, Missouri that sold for $10,700 last year. Now this land is selling for around $13,000.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

  Howard Audsley, who wears dark glasses and has his hair cut short in a crew cut, has been driving his Toyota truck through the state of Missouri for the past 30 years to assess the value of farmland. Barreling down the flat roads of Saline County, Mo., on a recent day, Audsley stopped his truck at a 160-acre tract of newly tilled black land. The land sold for $10,700 an acre last February, double what it would have gone for five years ago.

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Agriculture
10:09 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Why is farmland so expensive?

A clod of soil and some corn from some of the priciest land in Missouri: Saline County.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

On Friday, I left the rolling hills of Columbia, Mo., and headed northwest, to the flat farmland of Saline County. The purpose of the drive was to get a look at the priciest cropland in Missouri for a story I'm doing on how investors with no connection to farmland are increasingly interested in buying acreage in the Midwest. I had heard from farmers and real estate brokers that cropland values were at all-time highs in the Corn Belt, and incredibly many of the tracts of land are being paid for in cash.

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Agriculture
10:08 am
Wed October 31, 2012

The priciest farmland in Missouri [infographic]

A screenshot of KBIA's interactive map
Charles Minshew KBIA

Each July, the University of Missouri Extension sends out a survey to lenders, rural land appraisers and real estate brokers in the state to get a sense of average values for farmland. This past year, the counties with the most valuable farmland in the state -- those that average more than $5,000 per acre -- include Stoddard, Butler, Mississippi, New Madrid, Pemiscot, Dunklin, Saline, Carroll, Chariton, Pettis, Howard, Boone, Audrain, Callaway, Cooper, Scotland, Clark, Lewis, Marion and Ralls. 

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Politics
4:58 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Policymakers say 'broken food policy' should be on presidential debate agenda

Policymakers want food and farm policy to be addressed at the last presidential debate.
Selbe B flickr

Monday’s final presidential debate between Governor Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama in Boca Raton, Fla. will focus on foreign policy. But policymakers and researchers gathered at a University of Missouri food insecurity conference hope the candidates will make some time on the agenda for food and farm policy.

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Science, Health and Technology
8:14 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Canadian beef recall wreaks havoc in the U.S.

A piece of beef steak on a fork.
Big stock image

While Canada grapples with the largest beef recall in its history, meat suppliers and retailers in the U.S. have been dealing with their own share of fallout from the contaminated meat. The recall has consumers and food safety advocates demanding anew that the U.S. Department of Agriculture keep fresh meat border inspections in place so tainted meat can be stopped before it enters the food supply chain.

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Agriculture
9:51 am
Tue October 16, 2012

The struggle to trace produce from farm to table

The 62-year-old trucker Del Smith has survived rodeos, Vietnam and an industrial accident in Texas. But he never expected he'd meet his next brush with death in this very truck by eating a cantaloupe he bought in July at an Illinois farm stand.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

When he’s on the road, Del Smith’s home is his blue-and-silver 18-wheeler. The tidy cab has everything that Smith, who is a slight mustachioed man, needs for a long haul: a fridge for his iced tea, a bunk made with a blanket decorated with cowboy boots, a first-aid kit. In his 62 years of life, Smith’s survived near-death experiences riding rodeo, flying helicopters in Vietnam and, most recently, an industrial accident in Texas. He never thought his next brush with death would take place right here in his truck, after buying a cantaloupe in July from a Byron, Ill., farm stand.

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Agriculture
3:17 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Rediscovering my family farm

My dad, Mike Swanson, gets his first combine ride from our cousin, Darwin Swanson, during soybean harvest.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

This past weekend, for the first time in 25 years, my dad and I visited our family’s farm in Woodhull, Ill.

By family, I mean extended family. Brothers Doug and Darwin Swanson — my dad’s first cousins — run the farm, which got its start with land bought in 1890 by my great-great grandfather, Swan Swanson, when he moved to Illinois from Sweden.

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Agriculture
5:37 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Mud and Moonscape: Missouri towns struggle with flood recovery

"It is pure sand dunes," Atchison County Sheriff Dennis Martin said, of Corning, Mo. land still covered with sand a year after surging Missouri River waters receded. "Before the weeds started growing up, it looked like the moon."
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Back in April, Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock headed to Tekamah, Neb., to see how planting was going for farmers on the Missouri River floodplain. The river's surging waters put thousands of farm acres in Nebraska under water last summer, causing more than $100 million in crop losses in Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri.

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Agriculture
5:50 am
Fri September 21, 2012

Here's the short story on cow tails

Scott Poock, veterinarian for the University of Missouri Extension, demonstrates an alternative to cow tail docking at Foremost Dairy: trimming the switch off of a cow's tail.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Many people who haven’t stepped foot on a dairy might think milking a cow is a sort of Emersonian back-to-the land moment, where a milker bonds with his or her cow while communing with nature. Just milk her for a while and voilà: fresh, creamy milk. But the truth is, milking can be a very dirty job.

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Field Notes
4:22 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Talking science, decision-making and the Green Revolution with Dr. Roger Pielke Jr.

Dr. Roger Pielke Jr. speaks to a group on the campus of the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Field Notes is a regular feature by Harvest Public Media, in which reporters talk to newsmakers and experts about important issues related to food production.

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Agriculture
1:29 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Help us map out the drought in the Midwest

The nation’s worst drought in decades moved Harvest Public Media to look at how the drought is affecting livestock producers just starting out in the business.
Map by Abbie Fentress Swanson (Harvest Public Media). Data submitted by farmers and livestock producers through the Public Insight Network.

Parts of the Midwest got a reprieve from the drought this week, according to the latest US Drought Monitor report released on Thursday. The report found that last weekend’s cold front brought up to five inches of rain to southeastern Missouri, eastern Illinois and central Indiana.

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Science, Health and Technology
4:04 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Indiana farm linked to contaminated cantaloupe also recalls watermelons

In the produce section of the Schnucks grocery store in Columbia, Mo., the store posted a statement about the watermelon recall on a box of non-recalled watermelons. (Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media)
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

The Indiana farm that recalled cantaloupes linked to a Salmonella outbreak that has killed two and sickened 204 is now recalling its watermelons. Chamberlain Farms issued the voluntary recall because the melons could be contaminated with Salmonella Newport.

Foodborne illness is always a danger for farmers, grocery stores and customers alike.

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Agriculture
10:05 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Even after Hurricane Isaac, some Midwest farmers mired in drought

Hurricane Issac in Wisconsin.
MaryLouiseEklund/flickr

Heavy rains from Hurricane Isaac provided relief to some – but not all – farmers and ranchers in the drought-stricken Midwest, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor’s weekly report, which came out on Thursday.

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Prime
2:03 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

A pitch for getting more ranchers to produce higher-quality beef

Consumers are willing to pay more for prime grade steaks than they have in the past. Production hasn’t kept up with demand, which could mean more money in cow-calf producers’ pockets.
Adam Kuban/flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/slice/482963344/

As part of a new project called “Quality Beef by the Numbers,”  the University of Missouri is hoping to get more cow-calf operators in Missouri and neighboring states to produce higher-quality beef from their herds. The university says the move, announced in Columbia, Mo., last week, will make ranchers more money.

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Agriculture
1:16 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Longhorns, bluegrass and corn combining at the Farm Progress Show [Slideshow]

This 10-year-old Watusi steer named Stevie, who is owned by Garland Ranch, was on view at the Farm Progress Show. Stevie has horns that span more than five feet.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Thousands of farmers from the heartland braved the 97-degree heat in Boone, Iowa on Wednesday for the 2012 Farm Progress Show.

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Agriculture
3:05 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

Drought could edge livestock producers out of business

Alfred Brandt says he will have to pay $100,000 in out-of-pocket feed costs to get his 150 Holstein cows fed through next spring.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Brandt Dairy sits on Swan Creek at the end of a meandering gravel road in Linn, Missouri. The farm is bucolic with its twin silos, red barn and black-and-white Holstein cows. But the brown pastures, dry river bed and burnt corn fields are a reminder that there have been less than two inches of rain here in the last two months.

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Agriculture
4:22 pm
Sun August 19, 2012

Elected officials talk farm policy on the campaign trail

Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill made a campaign stop at a massive granary and fertilizer distributor on the banks of the Missouri River as part of her six-day "Fighting for our Farmers" tour.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Thirty-five farmers and agricultural workers applauded at the site of Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill’s big blue RV pulling up to the back of AGRI Services on Wednesday. The campaign stop at the massive granary and fertilizer distributor on the banks of the Missouri River in Brunswick, Mo. is part of the Democratic incumbent senator’s "Fighting for our Farmers" project.

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Field Notes

Field Notes is an opportunity for the Harvest Public Media team to dig even deeper into our coverage of food production through additional interviews, on-site reporting and audience feedback.  Each segment is produced and hosted by Abbie Fentress Swanson, at KBIA News in Columbia, MO.

More from Harvest Public Media here

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