Amy Simons

AMY SIMONS teaches multi-platform reporting and editing to students in the convergence journalism interest area.

Since joining the faculty in August 2010, Simons has developed an interested in international journalism, training professionals on campus and abroad. She has traveled across China and the European Union, teaching Web-first workflows, mobile journalism techniques and how to use social media as a reporting tool and a means to disseminate journalistic content.

Simons serves as the adviser to ONA Mizzou, the local club of the Online News Association and as a mentor in the school’s student competitions.

Previously Simons worked as digital news editor for the Chicago Tribune, where she helped develop and execute the editorial programming strategy for chicagotribune.com. While at the Tribune, Simons worked closely with the newsrooms of WGN-TV, CLTV News and WGN-AM to coordinate the coverage of daily and planned news events. Before joining the Chicago Tribune, she spent seven years at CLTV News, Tribune’s 24-hour news channel covering Chicago and the suburbs. Simons worked her way up through the ranks, joining the newsroom as the assignment desk assistant and leaving as an executive producer. At CLTV, she produced the award-winning business magazine show, Your Money, and was responsible for all of the station’s election coverage. Simons is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy Fox News

Fox News announced it is retracting its story on Seth Rich. The DNC staffer was murdered in Washington D.C. last summer. The cable network has been reporting for more than a week that his slaying came 12 days after contacting Wikileaks. Now, it says that reporting doesn’t stand up to its editorial standards. What changed? 

Fox News: “Statement on coverage of Seth Rich murder investigation

The Washington Post reports that President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with a Russian envoy during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The Trump administration denies the report – while the president is tweeted to the contrary. Where’s the truth?

FBI Photo

President Trump’s decision to fire now-former FBI Director James Comey came as a surprise to almost everyone Tuesday afternoon. How did reporters react in the moments and hours following the announcement?

Michael D. Shear & Matt Apuzzo, New York Times: “F.B.I. Director James Comey is fired by Trump

Fox News Channel is under new leadership. But, will Suzanne Scott bring true cultural change to an organization rife with claims of gender and racial bias?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Hannity denies he’s leaving Fox News

Video posted of a brutal murder in Cleveland forces Facebook to address the question again: is it a media company? What obligation does it have to monitor for criminal or violent content?

Emily Dreyfuss, Wired: “Facebook streams a murder and now must face itself

 Video of Dr. David Dao being dragged from a United Airlines flight by security officials has been circulating on social media since April 9. A United spokesperson explained the situation shortly afterword, saying that the flight was overbooked and the airline needed seats for stand-by United employees. Dao was randomly selected, but refused to give up his seat, resulting in his removal from the plane.

President Donald Trump approved missile strikes against a Syrian air base following a sarin gas attack on April 4 that killed more than 70 people. Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad maintains that the government was not responsible for the attack, but the U.S. and other countries believe the gas was released from military planes, making the air base a target for U.S. strikes.

Just when United Airlines couldn’t afford any more bad press, a customer is forcibly removed after refusing to deplane – and it’s caught on camera. Can the airline rebound and reclaim its reputation?

Lucas Aulbach, Louisville Courier-Journal: “Video shows man forcibly removed from United flight from Chicago to Louisville

A reporter for University of Tennessee-Chattanooga’s public radio station, WUTC-FM, was fired after the university said she violated ethics standards. At a meeting addressing Tennessee’s transgender bathroom bill, lawmakers said they had no way of knowing a reporter was present, as Jacqui Helbert did not announce herself as a journalist. Helbert said she was wearing a lanyard with press credentials and carrying a shotgun mic, a recording device and a bag with the station’s logo.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the motivation for Helbert’s firing and what it means for other public radio stations with university ties on the weekly media criticism program “Views of the News."

WLS-TV, in Chicago, led its 10 p.m. newscast with a story about flying wild turkeys. The two-minute segment covered a collision between a car and a flying turkey in rural Indiana, about 70 miles from the city, and the fluffy piece stirred some controversy.

What impact does a flying turkey accident have on people in Chicago? Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss how some newscasts have started to look more like viral videos on the weekly media criticism program “Views of the News."

via Flickr user Justin Hoch

Advertisers are walking away from Bill O’Reilly and Fox News following a New York Times report indicated more than $13 million had been paid out to those accusing him of sexual harassment. One year after Roger Ailes left the cable network following similar accusations, what’s ahead for O’Reilly?

Views of the News: YouTube Filters LGBTQ+ Material

Mar 26, 2017

For years, YouTube’s “restricted mode” has been an option for schools and parents who want to limit children’s access to sensitive content, but the site had to issue an apology after users discovered that some LGBTQ-related content was blocked under this filter.

The apology stated that while some LGBTQ-related content was available in restricted mode, videos that included “more sensitive issues” may not be.

United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did not let pool reporters into some meetings during his trip to the Demilitarized Zone in Korea, deciding to only take a Fox News reporter instead. Tillerson reportedly has little interaction with media, and recently made headlines for a comment saying “I’m not a big press access person.”

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discussed why Tillerson is so reluctant to involve the press in his affairs on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”
 

via Flickr user Hey Paul Studios

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas?

Sopan Deb, New York Times: “Trump proposes eliminating the arts and humanities endowments

via Flickr user Matt Spiel

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw?

Mike Scott, New Orleans Picayune: “Why you should be listening to ‘Missing Richard Simmons’

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response?

Ayesha Rascoe, Reuters, “White House bars some news organizations from briefing

Views of the News: When It's More Than A Game

Feb 27, 2017

Dexter Fowler told an ESPN reporter last week that the travel ban’s effect on his family was “unfortunate.” Fowler’s family was going to visit his wife’s family in Iran, but they postponed due to travel concerns. His comment was met with wave of criticism on social media. Among the comments were “shut up” and “just play ball.” Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon.

Reena Flores, CBS News: “White House chief of staff says take Trump seriously when he calls press ‘the enemy’

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations?

Jim Rutenberg, New York Times: “When a pillar of the fourth estate rests on a Trump-Murdoch axis

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?”

Mark Hensch & Jordan Fabian: “White House lists terror attacks it claims media ignored

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries.

Evan Perez, Pamela Brown & Kevin Liptak, CNN: “Inside the confusion of the Trump executive order and travel ban

Courtesy: NBC News

Alternate facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration?

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

Via Flickr user Hanbyul

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base.

Lauren Duca, Teen Vogue: “Donald Trump is gaslighting America

Courtesy: NBC News

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask?

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag.

Courtesy CBS

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?”

Leslie Stahl, 60 Minutes: “President-elect Trump speaks to a divided country on 60 Minutes

Advertising on Facebook? You have the option to target your ad to reach the audience YOU want to reach. But, what happens when your choices could constitute breaking the law?

Julia Angwin & Terry Parris, Jr., ProPublica: “Facebook lets advertisers exclude users by race

Gillian B. White, The Atlantic: “How Facebook’s ad tool fails to protect civil rights

The closer we get to Election Day, the hotter the rhetoric gets. We rely on our news media to cut through the clutter and put it all into context. But, where do the opinions end and the true reporting begin?

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