Amy Simons

AMY SIMONS teaches multi-platform reporting and editing to students in the convergence journalism interest area.

Since joining the faculty in August 2010, Simons has developed an interested in international journalism, training professionals on campus and abroad. She has traveled across China and the European Union, teaching Web-first workflows, mobile journalism techniques and how to use social media as a reporting tool and a means to disseminate journalistic content.

Simons serves as the adviser to ONA Mizzou, the local club of the Online News Association and as a mentor in the school’s student competitions.

Previously Simons worked as digital news editor for the Chicago Tribune, where she helped develop and execute the editorial programming strategy for chicagotribune.com. While at the Tribune, Simons worked closely with the newsrooms of WGN-TV, CLTV News and WGN-AM to coordinate the coverage of daily and planned news events. Before joining the Chicago Tribune, she spent seven years at CLTV News, Tribune’s 24-hour news channel covering Chicago and the suburbs. Simons worked her way up through the ranks, joining the newsroom as the assignment desk assistant and leaving as an executive producer. At CLTV, she produced the award-winning business magazine show, Your Money, and was responsible for all of the station’s election coverage. Simons is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism.

Ways to Connect

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners.

Chuck Plunkett, Rolling Stone: “Op-Ed: I stood up for ‘The Denver Post’ and was forced to resign

Maybe it’s time to retire the White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Michelle Wolf’s 15-minute act has many in our profession questioning the mission and purpose of the annual gala, and whether it’s time to put an end to it.

via Flickr Brian Solis

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?

After more than 130 years of some of the most stunning photojournalism ever published, the editors of National Geographic acknowledged that for decades, much of that has been racist in its coverage of people of color. What spurred this confession and what commitment is there among today’s staff to change?

Susan Goldberg, National Geographic: “For decades, our coverage was racist. To rise above our past, we must acknowledge it

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?

via Flickr user Mike Mozart

Kylie Jenner sent one tweet about a change in her Snapchat use and the company’s stock lost $1.3 billion in value. What did she say to cause investors to lose faith in the ephemeral platform? 

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times.

Sinclair Broadcast Group has asked its news directors to consider donating personal funds to the company’s political action committee to help fund its lobbying efforts. Is it a conflict of interest to pay to lobby the leaders you’re covering? 

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

It’s prime time for moviegoers, gearing up for the Academy Awards at the end of the month. Many of them are seeing as many films as they want for only $10 a month thanks to a new subscription service called MoviePass. How does it work and why are movie chains so against it? 

Think you’ve spotted fake news? Feel like you need to report it to someone? In Italy, news consumers are being asked to report fake news to a police agency who will fact check it, and if need be set the record straight. It might limit misinformation, but what effect might it have on freedom of the press?

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? 

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate?

Michael Wolff, NY Magazine: “Donald Trump didn’t want to be president”

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has been using the ephemeral messaging app Confide to communicate with top aides, leaving many to wonder what they’re discussing and whether records that should be public are being destroyed before the public can see them. Reporters across the state are trying to learn how and why it’s being used, with little success. Why the secrecy? And what will it take to access that content under the state’s Sunshine Law? 

Photo by Amy Simons

Five students from the University of Missouri's Honors College participated in a 16-week tutorial under the direction of Missouri School of Journalism professor Amy Simons on media criticism during the Fall 2017 term. For their final project, the students produced and hosted their own special edition of KBIA-FM's program, "Views of the News."

via

Brian Ross has long been regarded as one of the best investigative reporters in the business, but Friday’s fact error regarding Michael Flynn’s guilty plea created big problems for ABC. The network has suspended him for four weeks. But, to what end? 

The network notified Lauer of it's decision late Tuesday night after an investigation into claims of 'inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace.'  Keillor notified the Associated Press of his firing in an email to the agency. 

Is the media stirring the pot? Is the coverage of the sex scandals – now rocking entertainment, journalism and politics – potentially destroying innocent lives? In our attempts to listen to and be supportive of accusers are we denying the accused due process or benefit of the doubt? 

Covering the sexual assault and harassment scandals rocking the entertainment world hasn’t been easy for many journalists, but it’s even harder when the accusations fly within your own organization. 

via Flickr user Justin Hoch

Did 21st Century Fox renew Bill O’Reilly’s contract soon after he settled a sexual harassment suit for more than $32 million – six months after founder Roger Ailes’ ouster? A New York Times report says so.

Emily Steel & Michael S. Schmidt, New York Times: “O’Reilly settled new harassment claim, then Fox renewed his contract

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? 

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. 

CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? 

Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed: “Why Hollywood bombed so badly this summer

Courtesy KHOU-TV

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. 

Brian Stelter, CNN Money: “Networks, newspapers out in full force as Hurricane Harvey soaks Texas

Missouri Department of Conservation

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? 

  The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context? Professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel discuss this and more on this week's Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? 

Jack Shafer, POLITICO: “Megyn Kelly pantses Alex Jones

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly is under attack for an interview with Infowars' Alex Jones set to air Sunday evening on NBC. Will the interview expose a conspiracy theorist or just give him a platform to spread his beliefs?

Margaret Sullivan, Washington Post: “Exposing the evil of Alex Jones is crucial. A Megyn Kelly one-on-one is not the way to do it.

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