Amy Simons

AMY SIMONS teaches multi-platform reporting and editing to students in the convergence journalism interest area.

Since joining the faculty in August 2010, Simons has developed an interested in international journalism, training professionals on campus and abroad. She has traveled across China and the European Union, teaching Web-first workflows, mobile journalism techniques and how to use social media as a reporting tool and a means to disseminate journalistic content.

Simons serves as the adviser to ONA Mizzou, the local club of the Online News Association and as a mentor in the school’s student competitions.

Previously Simons worked as digital news editor for the Chicago Tribune, where she helped develop and execute the editorial programming strategy for chicagotribune.com. While at the Tribune, Simons worked closely with the newsrooms of WGN-TV, CLTV News and WGN-AM to coordinate the coverage of daily and planned news events. Before joining the Chicago Tribune, she spent seven years at CLTV News, Tribune’s 24-hour news channel covering Chicago and the suburbs. Simons worked her way up through the ranks, joining the newsroom as the assignment desk assistant and leaving as an executive producer. At CLTV, she produced the award-winning business magazine show, Your Money, and was responsible for all of the station’s election coverage. Simons is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism.

Ways to Connect

Views of the News: YouTube Filters LGBTQ+ Material

Mar 26, 2017

For years, YouTube’s “restricted mode” has been an option for schools and parents who want to limit children’s access to sensitive content, but the site had to issue an apology after users discovered that some LGBTQ-related content was blocked under this filter.

The apology stated that while some LGBTQ-related content was available in restricted mode, videos that included “more sensitive issues” may not be.

United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did not let pool reporters into some meetings during his trip to the Demilitarized Zone in Korea, deciding to only take a Fox News reporter instead. Tillerson reportedly has little interaction with media, and recently made headlines for a comment saying “I’m not a big press access person.”

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discussed why Tillerson is so reluctant to involve the press in his affairs on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”
 

via Flickr user Hey Paul Studios

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas?

Sopan Deb, New York Times: “Trump proposes eliminating the arts and humanities endowments

via Flickr user Matt Spiel

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw?

Mike Scott, New Orleans Picayune: “Why you should be listening to ‘Missing Richard Simmons’

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response?

Ayesha Rascoe, Reuters, “White House bars some news organizations from briefing

Views of the News: When It's More Than A Game

Feb 27, 2017

Dexter Fowler told an ESPN reporter last week that the travel ban’s effect on his family was “unfortunate.” Fowler’s family was going to visit his wife’s family in Iran, but they postponed due to travel concerns. His comment was met with wave of criticism on social media. Among the comments were “shut up” and “just play ball.” Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon.

Reena Flores, CBS News: “White House chief of staff says take Trump seriously when he calls press ‘the enemy’

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations?

Jim Rutenberg, New York Times: “When a pillar of the fourth estate rests on a Trump-Murdoch axis

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?”

Mark Hensch & Jordan Fabian: “White House lists terror attacks it claims media ignored

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries.

Evan Perez, Pamela Brown & Kevin Liptak, CNN: “Inside the confusion of the Trump executive order and travel ban

Courtesy: NBC News

Alternate facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration?

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

Via Flickr user Hanbyul

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base.

Lauren Duca, Teen Vogue: “Donald Trump is gaslighting America

Courtesy: NBC News

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask?

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag.

Courtesy CBS

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?”

Leslie Stahl, 60 Minutes: “President-elect Trump speaks to a divided country on 60 Minutes

Advertising on Facebook? You have the option to target your ad to reach the audience YOU want to reach. But, what happens when your choices could constitute breaking the law?

Julia Angwin & Terry Parris, Jr., ProPublica: “Facebook lets advertisers exclude users by race

Gillian B. White, The Atlantic: “How Facebook’s ad tool fails to protect civil rights

The closer we get to Election Day, the hotter the rhetoric gets. We rely on our news media to cut through the clutter and put it all into context. But, where do the opinions end and the true reporting begin?

via Flickr user justgrimes

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air.

The New York Times: “The New York Times lawyer responds to Donald Trump

Photo by Amy Simons (KBIA)

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations?

Courtesy Prixas Films via Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden?

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people? Was there ever any doubt that Donald Trump’s interview with Larry King would end up on Vladimir Putin’s RT network? Also, what pressure did Matt Lauer’s performance during a candidate forum put on future debate moderators? Facebook’s about face on censoring an iconic photo from the Vietnam War, the role of the local gossip columnist. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people?

Callum Borchers, Washington Post: “Conservative media – and NPR – entertain the possibility of a Hillary Clinton replacement

Image courtesy of Fox News Channel

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Today, the network announced a settlement.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “Fox News has settled Gretchen Carlson’s sexual harassment suit for $20 million

marcn/FLICKR

The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data?

Jeff Jarvis: “Specimens of old journalism

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia?

Raphael Satter & Maggie Michael, Associated Press: “Private lives exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on.

via Flickr user Jere Keys

President Obama spoke told mourners the memorial service for five slain Dallas police officers that “we are not as divided as we seem,” following a week of police-involved shootings. How did the presence of video from two police-involved shootings move the dialogue forward? What caused conservative media to take notice of incidents of police brutality against people of color? And, did the media help the situation or hurt it? 

via Flickr user Matt Stoller

The Hill, The Atlantic and POLITICO are among the news organizations offering sponsorships opportunities for events at the Republican and Democratic National Conventions later this month. In many cases, special interests are footing the bill. Is it a conflict of interest or creative way to create and alternative revenue stream… or both?

Lee Fang, The Intercept: “Major political news outlets offer interviews for sale at DNC and RNC conventions

Pages