Amy Simons

AMY SIMONS teaches multi-platform reporting and editing to students in the convergence journalism interest area.

Since joining the faculty in August 2010, Simons has developed an interested in international journalism, training professionals on campus and abroad. She has traveled across China and the European Union, teaching Web-first workflows, mobile journalism techniques and how to use social media as a reporting tool and a means to disseminate journalistic content.

Simons serves as the adviser to ONA Mizzou, the local club of the Online News Association and as a mentor in the school’s student competitions.

Previously Simons worked as digital news editor for the Chicago Tribune, where she helped develop and execute the editorial programming strategy for chicagotribune.com. While at the Tribune, Simons worked closely with the newsrooms of WGN-TV, CLTV News and WGN-AM to coordinate the coverage of daily and planned news events. Before joining the Chicago Tribune, she spent seven years at CLTV News, Tribune’s 24-hour news channel covering Chicago and the suburbs. Simons worked her way up through the ranks, joining the newsroom as the assignment desk assistant and leaving as an executive producer. At CLTV, she produced the award-winning business magazine show, Your Money, and was responsible for all of the station’s election coverage. Simons is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism.

Ways to Connect

CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? 

Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed: “Why Hollywood bombed so badly this summer

Courtesy KHOU-TV

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. 

Brian Stelter, CNN Money: “Networks, newspapers out in full force as Hurricane Harvey soaks Texas

Missouri Department of Conservation

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? 

  The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context? Professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel discuss this and more on this week's Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? 

Jack Shafer, POLITICO: “Megyn Kelly pantses Alex Jones

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly is under attack for an interview with Infowars' Alex Jones set to air Sunday evening on NBC. Will the interview expose a conspiracy theorist or just give him a platform to spread his beliefs?

Margaret Sullivan, Washington Post: “Exposing the evil of Alex Jones is crucial. A Megyn Kelly one-on-one is not the way to do it.

Is she the next Edward Snowden? We’ll talk about the arrest of Reality Leigh Winner on charges of leaking top-secret documents detailing a 2016 Russian cyberattack on election software.   

Matthew Cole, Richard Esposito, Sam Biddle & Ryan Grim, The Intercept: “Top-secret NSA report details Russian hacking effort days before 2016 election

Courtesy Fox News

Fox News announced it is retracting its story on Seth Rich. The DNC staffer was murdered in Washington D.C. last summer. The cable network has been reporting for more than a week that his slaying came 12 days after contacting Wikileaks. Now, it says that reporting doesn’t stand up to its editorial standards. What changed? 

Fox News: “Statement on coverage of Seth Rich murder investigation

The Washington Post reports that President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with a Russian envoy during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The Trump administration denies the report – while the president is tweeted to the contrary. Where’s the truth?

FBI Photo

President Trump’s decision to fire now-former FBI Director James Comey came as a surprise to almost everyone Tuesday afternoon. How did reporters react in the moments and hours following the announcement?

Michael D. Shear & Matt Apuzzo, New York Times: “F.B.I. Director James Comey is fired by Trump

Fox News Channel is under new leadership. But, will Suzanne Scott bring true cultural change to an organization rife with claims of gender and racial bias?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Hannity denies he’s leaving Fox News

Video posted of a brutal murder in Cleveland forces Facebook to address the question again: is it a media company? What obligation does it have to monitor for criminal or violent content?

Emily Dreyfuss, Wired: “Facebook streams a murder and now must face itself

 Video of Dr. David Dao being dragged from a United Airlines flight by security officials has been circulating on social media since April 9. A United spokesperson explained the situation shortly afterword, saying that the flight was overbooked and the airline needed seats for stand-by United employees. Dao was randomly selected, but refused to give up his seat, resulting in his removal from the plane.

President Donald Trump approved missile strikes against a Syrian air base following a sarin gas attack on April 4 that killed more than 70 people. Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad maintains that the government was not responsible for the attack, but the U.S. and other countries believe the gas was released from military planes, making the air base a target for U.S. strikes.

Just when United Airlines couldn’t afford any more bad press, a customer is forcibly removed after refusing to deplane – and it’s caught on camera. Can the airline rebound and reclaim its reputation?

Lucas Aulbach, Louisville Courier-Journal: “Video shows man forcibly removed from United flight from Chicago to Louisville

A reporter for University of Tennessee-Chattanooga’s public radio station, WUTC-FM, was fired after the university said she violated ethics standards. At a meeting addressing Tennessee’s transgender bathroom bill, lawmakers said they had no way of knowing a reporter was present, as Jacqui Helbert did not announce herself as a journalist. Helbert said she was wearing a lanyard with press credentials and carrying a shotgun mic, a recording device and a bag with the station’s logo.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the motivation for Helbert’s firing and what it means for other public radio stations with university ties on the weekly media criticism program “Views of the News."

WLS-TV, in Chicago, led its 10 p.m. newscast with a story about flying wild turkeys. The two-minute segment covered a collision between a car and a flying turkey in rural Indiana, about 70 miles from the city, and the fluffy piece stirred some controversy.

What impact does a flying turkey accident have on people in Chicago? Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss how some newscasts have started to look more like viral videos on the weekly media criticism program “Views of the News."

via Flickr user Justin Hoch

Advertisers are walking away from Bill O’Reilly and Fox News following a New York Times report indicated more than $13 million had been paid out to those accusing him of sexual harassment. One year after Roger Ailes left the cable network following similar accusations, what’s ahead for O’Reilly?

Views of the News: YouTube Filters LGBTQ+ Material

Mar 26, 2017

For years, YouTube’s “restricted mode” has been an option for schools and parents who want to limit children’s access to sensitive content, but the site had to issue an apology after users discovered that some LGBTQ-related content was blocked under this filter.

The apology stated that while some LGBTQ-related content was available in restricted mode, videos that included “more sensitive issues” may not be.

United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did not let pool reporters into some meetings during his trip to the Demilitarized Zone in Korea, deciding to only take a Fox News reporter instead. Tillerson reportedly has little interaction with media, and recently made headlines for a comment saying “I’m not a big press access person.”

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discussed why Tillerson is so reluctant to involve the press in his affairs on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”
 

via Flickr user Hey Paul Studios

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas?

Sopan Deb, New York Times: “Trump proposes eliminating the arts and humanities endowments

via Flickr user Matt Spiel

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw?

Mike Scott, New Orleans Picayune: “Why you should be listening to ‘Missing Richard Simmons’

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response?

Ayesha Rascoe, Reuters, “White House bars some news organizations from briefing

Views of the News: When It's More Than A Game

Feb 27, 2017

Dexter Fowler told an ESPN reporter last week that the travel ban’s effect on his family was “unfortunate.” Fowler’s family was going to visit his wife’s family in Iran, but they postponed due to travel concerns. His comment was met with wave of criticism on social media. Among the comments were “shut up” and “just play ball.” Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon.

Reena Flores, CBS News: “White House chief of staff says take Trump seriously when he calls press ‘the enemy’

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations?

Jim Rutenberg, New York Times: “When a pillar of the fourth estate rests on a Trump-Murdoch axis

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?”

Mark Hensch & Jordan Fabian: “White House lists terror attacks it claims media ignored

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries.

Evan Perez, Pamela Brown & Kevin Liptak, CNN: “Inside the confusion of the Trump executive order and travel ban

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