Amy Simons

AMY SIMONS teaches multi-platform reporting and editing to students in the convergence journalism interest area.

Since joining the faculty in August 2010, Simons has developed an interested in international journalism, training professionals on campus and abroad. She has traveled across China and the European Union, teaching Web-first workflows, mobile journalism techniques and how to use social media as a reporting tool and a means to disseminate journalistic content.

Simons serves as the adviser to ONA Mizzou, the local club of the Online News Association and as a mentor in the school’s student competitions.

Previously Simons worked as digital news editor for the Chicago Tribune, where she helped develop and execute the editorial programming strategy for chicagotribune.com. While at the Tribune, Simons worked closely with the newsrooms of WGN-TV, CLTV News and WGN-AM to coordinate the coverage of daily and planned news events. Before joining the Chicago Tribune, she spent seven years at CLTV News, Tribune’s 24-hour news channel covering Chicago and the suburbs. Simons worked her way up through the ranks, joining the newsroom as the assignment desk assistant and leaving as an executive producer. At CLTV, she produced the award-winning business magazine show, Your Money, and was responsible for all of the station’s election coverage. Simons is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism.

Ways to Connect

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

It’s been a historic week at the University of Missouri. On Monday, Tim Wolfe resigned as president of the UM System. Hours later, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from that office at the end of the year. We’ll look at local, regional and national media coverage, talk about challenges to the First Amendment, and examine the role of Mizzou Football.

Courtesy CNBC

A week after the last Republican presidential debate, the candidates and networks are still debating rules and procedures for future debates. What will it take to break the impasse?

David Wiegel and Robert Costa, Washington Post: “GOP contenders demand greater control over crucial debates

The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry.

Hugh Forrest, South by Southwest: “Strong Community Management: Why we canceled two panels for SXSW 2016

via Flickr user Wonderlane

One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters?

Jay Carney, Medium: “What the New York Times didn’t tell you

via Flickr user Matthew Hurst

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs.

Ravi Somaiya, New York Times: “Playboy to drop nudity as internet fills demand

New York Times: “Playboy in popular culture

In the hours and days following the last week's massacre at Umpqua Community College, many called on the media not to name the shooter. The idea? Not to give him the attention and fame he was seeking in carrying out the act. But, there are many in the journalism community who say that while they can respect the concept of the 'No Notoriety' campaign, we'd be betraying the basic tenants of our profession if we adhered.

Via Flickr user pml2008

Pope Francis made his first trip the United States. For five days, he met with dignitaries, church officials, Catholics and members of the public. And, for those five days, the cable networks were practically wall-to-wall. Was the coverage too much? Too little? Or just right?

Courtesy thejournal.ie

Images of war are often graphic and gruesome. They evoke personal, emotional reactions – and often we choose not to publish them because of the depths of truth they show. And, sometimes when we do publish them, we can change the course of history. Some are saying the photos of 3-year-old Ayland Kurdi’s body washed up on a Turkish beach could be the next iconic photo to influence public thinking – much like the 1972 image of the girl fleeing a napalm attack in Vietnam.

Courtesy WDBJ-TV

Who is the blame for the shooting deaths of WDBJ-TV journalists Alison Parker and Adam Ward? The easy answer to that question is the shooter -- but is there a deeper, more nuanced answer? Some point the finger at the gun lobby, others point it at failings in the mental health system. MSNBC's Joe Scarborough says it's the fault the of the 24-hour cable news networks.

Hackers stole hook-up site Ashley Madison's member database and made it searchable online. Since that happened, media outlets around the world have been scouring the data and identifying users. Is it ethical for journalists to publish the data, given it's been made available to them via illegal means?

Chava Gourarie, Columbia Journalism Review: “Is it ethical to write about hacked Ashley Madison users?

Courtesy Chicago Tribune

At a time when so many are writing anniversary stories looking back on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina,  Chicago Tribune columnist Kristen McQueary wrote a column under the headline "In Chicago, Wishing for a Hurricane Katrina."

That headline was changed after readers took great offense to McQueary's assertion that the city of Chicago needs a storm the size and strength of Katrina to reset the city's mounting debt, it's struggling schools and it's political infighting.

KBIA

One year after the death of Michael Brown, the people of Ferguson remember what happened there -- and what it has meant to the community. 

We'll look at the media coverage of the anniversary, the protests that erupted again in the streets of that St. Louis suburb and how the media remains at the center of it all.

via Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski

What happens when human rights issue is also a political one? Should news organizations or individual journalists pick sides and state their allegiances? We’ll analyze how the national and local media covered this week’s landmark Supreme Court decisions on marriage equality, the death penalty, health care subsidies, and more.

via Flickr user Jana Beamer

Less than 24 hours after pop rocker Taylor Swift told Apple she'd withhold her hit album, 1989, from the new Apple Music streaming service, the company revised its plan for royalty payouts. Originally, Apple wasn't planning to pay record labels royalties for streams during the free three-month trial period.

Taylor Swift: “To Apple, Love Taylor

Courtesy KXLY-TV

A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. What is it like to ask questions of someone when you know it'll likely change the course of their life forever? Has the media been fair to Rachel Dolezal, her experience and her story?

Jeff Humphrey, KXLY: "First on KXLY: Rachel Dolezal responds to race allegations"

Courtesy Fox News Channel

Members of the Duggar family appeared on Fox News Channel's The Kelly File to to talk about the abuse allegations against the oldest child, Josh. Jessa Duggar Seewald and Jill Duggar Dillard told Megyn Kelly they are two of their brother's victims. But, they said, they've long forgiven him. Instead, they say, it the media violated them and privacy laws were broken in the process.

Courtesy Vanity Fair

After months of rumor and speculation, tabloid headlines and network news interviews, Caitlyn Jenner made her debut with the release of July issue of Vanity Fair magazine.

Jenner's transition has made headlines -- and raised questions about how the media covers the transgender community.

Vanity Fair: “Introducing Caitlyn Jenner

via Flickr user Lwp Kommunikacio

Cable channel TLC pulled the reality tv series “19 Kids & Counting” amidst allegations the eldest child, Josh Duggar, was named in an underage sex abuse complaint. When did TLC first learn of the allegations?

In Touch Weekly: "Bombshell Duggar police report: Jim Bob Duggar didn’t report son Josh’s alleged sex offenses for more than a year

Verizon has announced it plans to buy AOL for $4.4 billion in an effort to drive the provider's mobile and over-the-top (OTT) video strategies. 

via Wikimedia user Veggies

There's quiet in the streets of Baltimore again, but the media is still talking about the death of Freddie Gray and the protests that erupted in the aftermath.

David Zurawik, Baltimore Sun: “FOP besmirches media, but WBAL has clear conflict of interest with prosecutor’s office

Courtesy NBC

Remember NBC’s franchise, “To Catch a Predator?” Chris Hansen does, and he hopes you do, too. The former network investigative reporter is launching a Kickstarter campaign to revive the one-time hit. If he’s successful in raising $400,000, his new program “Hansen vs. Predator” will run online while Hansen tries to sell it to a network.

Courtesy Rolling Stone

The Columbia Journalism School issued a 12,600-plus word indictment of Rolling Stone's story, "A Rape on Campus."  The months-long investigation revealed a breakdown in the reporting, editing and fact-checking processes -- as reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely put too much emphasis on an account provided to her by a single source, "Jackie." It also pointed to fatal flaws in the verification of her story prior to publication.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

Courtesy Starbucks

Coffee giant Starbucks and USA Today have teamed up to start a nationwide conversation about race. Baristas as encouraged to write "#RaceTogether" on drink cups and initiate conversations with customers about racial issues. Friday, there will be a special section in the print editions of the USA Today. That supplement will also be available in Starbucks retail locations.

via Flickr user Bureau of IIP

Hillary Clinton told reporters Tuesday she chose to use a private email address for her communications while Secretary of State out of convenience.  She maintains she did nothing wrong, but does wish she had done things differently.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “With Clinton quip, Kerry expresses his attitude toward open records

State of Missouri

What is the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Last week, when Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it was front-page news. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a voicemail Schweich left for Editorial Page Editor Tony Messenger moments before firing the shot. Was publishing a violation of Shweich’s privacy or in the best interest of the public? 

via Flickr user Justin Hoch

A story published in Mother Jones claims Fox News Channel host Bill O'Reilly made up stories about his time covering the Falklands War for CBS News.  According to Mother Jones - and some of O'Reilly's former colleagues - it was impossible for him to have seen the instances of combat he describes. Missouri School of Journalism alum and former KFRU-AM news director Eric Engberg is among those disputing O'Reilly's accounts.

This was a week that was hard on many in the media world, with the sudden deaths of both David Carr and Bob Simon, the suspension of Brian Williams, and word that Jon Stewart would be leaving "The Daily Show."

Former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein told CNN's Brian Stelter that these four stories all tie together, as we come together to strive to tell the best version of the truth.

via Flickr user David Shankbone

NBC suspended Nightly News Managing Editor and anchor Brian Williams for six months, without pay, after he was found to have misrepresented events which occurred while on assignment in Iraq in 2003.

Williams has repeatedly described reporting from Iraq when the Chinook helicopter he was in took fire from an RPG attack.  Last week, Stars and Stripes reported it had proof Williams account of that attack was not factual.

Williams apologized.  But, that's led many to question the validity of his other reports and his journalistic credibility.

via Wikimedia

More than 100 people have contracted measles, most exposed after visits to Disneyland. The resurgence of the illness has given new life to the debate over whether parents should vaccinate their children. This week, that debate became political. While most government leaders are urging people to inoculate their children, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), himself a medical doctor, told CNBC he's known of cases in which vaccines have caused "profound medical disorders."

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