Associated Press

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump tried unsuccessfully to buy a Kansas City casino in 1999, but documents from that aborted effort aren't public because he withdrew his application for a Missouri gaming license.

The Kansas City-based Hale Center for Journalism reports news outlets and the Democratic National Committee are interested in obtaining the records, but they're out of luck.

A Missouri Gaming Commission attorney says the files are protected from public scrutiny under state law because the commission never acted on the application.

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A state report says Missouri businesses saw a net growth of more than 8,700 private-sector employers in 2015.

The report from the Missouri Department of Economic Development says that's a 5 percent gain over the previous year. The report was released last week.

The Jefferson City News Tribune reports that the report also says small businesses with 10 employees or fewer accounted for 77 percent of Missouri's roughly 182,000 private-sector employers in 2015. Businesses with between one and 49 employees accounted for 95 percent.

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A Missouri state senator says a company that employs about 15,000 people in the St. Louis area should be disqualified from receiving tax credits or investments because it is doing business with Iran.

St. Louis County Republican Sen. Eric Schmitt is pushing legislation to block Missouri tax funds from being invested in any company that does business with a country the U.S. State Department has designated as a state sponsor of terrorism.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that includes the Boeing Co., which has a deal to sell 80 passenger jets to Iran's state-owned airline.

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Columbia is battling a lawsuit from a man whose conviction in a sports editor's death was overturned after he served nearly a decade in prison.

The city argued Wednesday before the federal appeals court in St. Louis that six Columbia police officers should be protected against the claims in Ryan Ferguson's $100 million civil lawsuit. The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that judges will consider the city's immunity appeal before ruling.

Marijuana
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A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

 

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

 

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

St. Louis Rams vs. San Francisco 49ers
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A federal judge has ruled that the NFL's Rams must grant season tickets to some people who bought personal seat licenses while the team was still in St. Louis, even though the team is now in Los Angeles.

 

  U.S. District Judge Stephen Limbaugh Jr. also said Wednesday that the Rams must refund deposits for other people who bought PSLs in St. Louis.

 

NFL owners in January approved the Rams' move back to Los Angeles after 21 seasons in St. Louis.

 

It wasn't immediately clear if the Rams would appeal. Messages left Thursday with the team and its attorneys were not immediately returned.

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A federal judge has upheld Missouri's licensing requirements for African-style hair braiders, despite claims from braiders that the process is irrelevant to what they do, unnecessary and expensive.

U.S. Magistrate Judge John M. Bodenhausen issued the ruling Tuesday. Attorneys for two St. Louis-area hair braiders, Joba Niang and Tameka Stigers, said Wednesday that they will appeal.

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A Missouri county's courthouse and law enforcement center remain without telephone or internet service after federal investigators removed computer equipment following a breach of that system.

The Lake Sun Leader reports computer servers and telephone service have been down at the Camden County Courthouse and justice center since Monday, while four members of the county's information technology have been suspended with pay.

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  Videos obtained by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch provide new insight into a fatal 2011 police shooting that led to first-degree murder charges this year against a white officer, who was carrying a personal assault rifle.

Jason Stockley, who is white, was charged in May in the Dec. 20, 2011, death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man who was shot and killed after a chase.

A federal judge has prohibited the release of videos and police reports by lawyers who obtained it as part of a civil case.

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

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Top officials for Monsanto and Bayer are defending their proposed $66 billion merger as a deal that could help American farmers through greater investments in technology. They made the case Tuesday to skeptical senators worried the merger could hurt American farmers already struggling with lower crop prices and higher seed costs.

The combination of the American seed and weed-killer and German medicine and farm-chemical maker would create a global agricultural and chemical giant with a broad array of products.

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A spokesman for a campaign to allow medical marijuana in Missouri says the proposal likely won't go to voters this year.

New Approach Missouri spokesman Jack Cardetti said Tuesday that a Cole County circuit judge won't count at least some contested petition signatures needed to get the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signed petitions. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

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The Missouri Supreme Court says voters will get to decide whether to raise cigarette taxes to benefit early childhood programs.

Judges ruled Tuesday that the proposal will stay on the Nov. 8 ballot.

The measure would phase in a 60-cent-per-pack increase of the state's lowest-in-the-nation tobacco taxes. It also would raise fees by 67 cents a pack for off-brand cigarettes, in addition to the tax hike.

Cigarette giant Reynolds American Inc. is backing the proposal.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

 

   The Senate is set to take a closer look at a proposed $66 billion merger of American seed and weed-killer company Monsanto and German medicine and farm chemical maker Bayer.

The deal combines two of the six U.S. and European companies that dominate the agrochemical market, and would create a global agricultural and chemical giant with a broad array of products. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley of Iowa has said he's concerned that the consolidation could hurt American farmers who are already worried about rising costs.

Missouri Supreme Court
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A Missouri initiative to re-instate campaign contribution limits has cleared its final legal hurdle to appear on the November ballot.

The state Supreme Court on Monday turned down a request to hear a challenge of the proposed constitutional amendment.

The proposal known as Constitutional Amendment 2 would limit contributions to candidates to $2,600 per election and cap donations to political parties at $25,000.

Missouri's previous campaign contribution limits were repealed in 2008. Since then, some donors have routinely given five- and six-figure checks.

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

Supporters of a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri say thousands of signed petitions to get the measure on the ballot were wrongly tossed out.

A lawyer for the group New Approach Missouri told a circuit judge Monday that enough registered voters signed a petition to get the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander's office says the proposal fell about 2,200 short of signatures needed.

Missouri will host the pilot project for an initiative to make radio history available through a national archive.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Radio Preservation Task Force, overseen by the Library of Congress, is collecting and cataloging radio recordings. Missouri is the pilot in part because of preservation efforts already made in St. Louis and Kansas City.

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Bankers say weak farm income continues to weigh down the economy in rural parts of 10 Plains and Western states.

The overall rural economic index for the region remained in negative territory and declined to 37.3 in September from August's 41.1.

Survey officials say any score below 50 on any of the survey's indexes suggests a decline in that area.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss says farm income is expected to decline 12 percent over last year. that is limiting spending by farmers and hurting the economy in rural areas.

Missouri Capitol
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Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has cut $59 million of spending for schools, roads and other programs to counteract new tax breaks enacted when lawmakers overrode his vetoes.

Nixon announced the budget cuts Thursday, a day after lawmakers overrode his vetoes.

The cuts include more than $24 million for K-12 schools, $20 million for highway projects, more than $8 million for higher education and more than $4 million for agricultural programs.

Internal Kansas City police documents show a police unit set up to investigate crimes against children failed to properly investigate thousands of cases, with some detectives doing no work at all.

A special squad asked to clear backlogged cases found such serious problems that Police Chief Darryl Forte in January suspended nearly all of the detectives and sergeants in the Crimes Against Children Unit.

Missouri Capitol
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Missouri lawmakers have concluded their annual veto session after overriding Gov. Jay Nixon to enact measures loosening state gun laws and tightening voting requirements.

The Republican-led Legislature overrode the Democratic governor on a total of 13 vetoes Wednesday.

The guns laws allow most adults to carry concealed weapons without needing permits.

The photo ID requirement is contingent on passage of a November ballot measure.

Nixon, who is in his final year in office, already was the most overridden governor in Missouri history.

prison cell
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An appellate panel that ordered Missouri to reveal its supplier of lethal injection drugs is giving the state another chance to make its case to shield that information.

In a federal lawsuit challenging Mississippi's three-drug execution protocol, two death-row inmates have subpoenaed Missouri for details about the using the single sedative, pentobarbital, in executions. Richard Jordan and Ricky Chase argue that Mississippi's three-drug protocol is torturous and unconstitutionally cruel.

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The University of Missouri says it's putting $1.6 million toward doubling its numbers of minority faculty to 13 percent in four years.

The Kansas City Star reports that university leaders met on the Columbia campus Tuesday to discuss efforts in the past year to improve diversity, inclusion and race relations.

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 A Missouri state senator has refused to stand while her colleagues recited the Pledge of Allegiance in the state Capitol.

Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, a St. Louis Democrat, says her silent protest Wednesday on the Senate floor was intended to show solidarity with San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Kaepernick has kneeled for the national anthem in protest of police brutality and racial oppression. Nasheed, who is black, says she wants to call attention to those issues and isn't "anti-America." Nasheed's protest was met with silence in the chamber.

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  Missouri lawmakers have overridden Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a measure to require voters to present photo identification at the polls.

The Republican-led Legislature overturned the Democratic governor's veto Wednesday after GOP senators forced an end to debate.

Lawmakers' action is the first step to enact the policy in the state. Voters on Nov. 8 also must vote to amend the Missouri Constitution to allow for a photo identification law in order for the policy to be enacted.

That's needed because the Missouri Supreme Court has previously found voter photo ID laws to be unconstitutional.

An appeals court judge has ruled that a do-over election in a state representative Democratic primary in St. Louis can go on as planned on Friday.

Incumbent Rep. Penny Hubbard defeated challenger Bruce Franks by 90 votes in the Aug. 2 primary. But concerns were raised about absentee voting, where Hubbard received 78.5 percent of the vote. Circuit Judge Rex Burlison on Sept. 2 called for a new election.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Missouri Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday that the new election can proceed.

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State and federal regulators say 32 disposal wells in northeastern Oklahoma must shut down because they are too near a newly discovered fault line that produced the state's strongest earthquake on record.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission said Monday that 27 wells under its jurisdiction would cease operations, along with five wells in Osage County, which is covered by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rules.

St. Louis Arch
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A carriage company has been ordered to stop giving rides in St. Louis and St. Louis County after allegations that it used unlicensed drivers and worked horses on extremely hot days.

The St. Louis Metropolitan Taxicab Commission, which governs vehicles for hire, ordered Brookdale Farms to end the rides after a hearing last week.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports carriage rides are prohibited when heat and humidity cause a "feels-like" temperature of 100 degrees or more.

University of Missouri

A national accreditation group says the University of Missouri School of Medicine must address several areas of concern within two years to maintain its accreditation.

The report by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education says, among other things, that the number of Missouri medical students who reported experiencing gender discrimination is twice as high as the national average. The committee accredits medical degree programs.

Missouri State Highway Patrol

 A retired sergeant who spoke out after a handcuffed Iowa man drowned is suing three Missouri Highway Patrol officials, saying they conspired against him and forced him to retire early.

The Kansas City Star reports that Randy Henry filed the lawsuit Thursday.

Twenty-year-old Brandon Ellingson was arrested in 2014 on the Lake of the Ozarks on suspicion of boating while intoxicated. While being transported, he tumbled into the water wearing an improperly secured life vest and drowned.

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