Associated Press

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The Missouri House has given final approval to a proposal that supporters say would bring hundreds of jobs to the southeastern corner of the state.

The proposal passed Wednesday with a 120-17 vote.

The original bill would've allowed steel-works facilities and aluminum smelters to negotiate lower utilities rates than what is allowed under current law. Lawmakers later expanded the proposal to allow any new facility using more than 50 megawatts of electricity a month to negotiate lower rates.

umkc.edu

University of Missouri-Kansas City Chancellor Leo Morton plans to retire at the end of the next academic year.

Morton announced his decision Tuesday in an email to faculty. He has been chancellor since 2008, after being an administrator at Aquila Inc.

KCUR-FM reports that Morton says he hopes to spend his final year at the school completing projects like the Downtown Arts Campus, Career Development Institute and fundraising for a new engineering lab facility. He called the chancellor's job one of the greatest privileges and blessings of his life.

Lincoln University
Kristina D.C. Hoeppner

 

Lincoln University in Jefferson City plans to cut 48 jobs and reduce salaries as it tries to respond to a budget deficit.

The school, which is facing a $3.8 million deficit in its fiscal 2018 budget, announced Monday that 32.5 staff and 15.5 faculty positions will be cut.

KRCG reports a statement from the school said the jobs services it provides to students will continue knowing that the workforce is already stretched too thin.

Doug Kerr / Flickr

A court ruling requires Missouri to at least temporarily remove GPS monitoring devices from some sex offenders.

The injunction was filed Monday in Cole County in a lawsuit filed against the state on behalf of a sex offender from St. Charles County.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Department of Corrections Board of Probation and Parole installed 364 GPS ankle monitors on sex offenders in April because of new security requirements. Lifetime monitoring was not part of the offenders' sentencing agreements.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Some St. Louis Catholics are suing the city over an ordinance that protects women against workplace discrimination based on whether they've had an abortion, used contraceptives or are pregnant.

The federal lawsuit was filed Monday on behalf of a group of Roman Catholic grade schools; a home for pregnant women; and a private company whose owner is Catholic. It seeks to stop the city from enforcing the ordinance, which opponents say makes St. Louis a sanctuary city for abortion.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has named a longtime banker as the acting director of the state's Division of Financial Institutions.

The governor announced in a news release Friday that Lee Keith will be the state's new finance director.

Keith was the former president of Gold Bank in St. Joseph, Missouri, and also led banks in Sullivan, Springfield, and Columbia, Missouri. He recently led a turnaround effort for Mercantile Bank in Quincy, Illinois.

Keith's appointment will be subject to Senate confirmation.

students in classroom
Rachel Rice / KBIA

Missouri school districts are looking forward to the possibility of more funding for early childhood education next year.

Lawmakers this year, for the first time in recent memory, hit their self-imposed target for school funding at roughly $3.4 billion. That triggers a law that requires the state to spend more next year on pre-K education.

It's a move that Republicans have lauded as a monumental step for education. But some educators and lawmakers question whether the state can afford it.

umkc.edu

University of Missouri-Kansas City officials say the school plans to cut about 30 jobs as part of efforts to reduce the campus budget.

University of Missouri System President Mun Choi said last month the system's four campuses must impose 8 to 12 percent budget reductions for fiscal year 2018 to prepare for an expected drop in state aid.

Missouri-Kansas City announced the layoffs Thursday but added no details about which jobs will be eliminated.

Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

Missouri is asking a federal appellate court to put on hold a judge's order blocking the state's abortion-restricting rules, insisting the requirements are justified.

The state's challenge Thursday to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals came a day after U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs refused to delay enforcing the preliminary injunction he issued last month in favor of Planned Parenthood affiliates with Missouri health centers.

Steve Corsi/Missouri Governor's Office

 Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has named a new acting director of the Department of Social Services.

The governor announced Friday that Steve Corsi would take over the department.

A news release says Corsi currently serves as the director of the Wyoming Department of Family Services. He previously worked as a clinical director in several health care facilities and is currently an officer in the Army National Guard.

Corsi also spent nearly a decade in the Air Force and spent time as the CEO of High County Behavioral Health in Wyoming.

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

Missouri Democratic Rep. Randy Dunn says he will be resigning from the Missouri House, effective May 31.

Dunn announced in a Facebook post Thursday and on the floor of the House last week that he will not be returning to the Legislature next year.

A Facebook post on Dunn's page says that he will accept a job in Omaha, Nebraska, as the executive director of a community development organization.

Dunn represents the 23rd district in Kansas City and has served in the Missouri House since 2012.

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The interim chancellor and provost at the University of Missouri says she is not a candidate to become permanent chancellor.

Chancellor and Provost Garnett Stokes, who took over May 3, 2017, said Tuesday the she expects the new chancellor to be named within the next two weeks. She said that she is not a candidate, but she did not say whether she had been interested or not. 

school buses
Twix / Flickr

Turmoil continues at a suburban St. Louis school where several students were suspended after walking out in support for union teachers.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that students stood with signs outside Hazelwood West High School before classes Wednesday to protest the five-day suspensions of their classmates.

Seal of the State Auditor
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway says a law to allow more people to request criminal record expungements and raise application fees could violate the state Constitution.

Galloway warned Tuesday that a 2016 law could go over limits on lawmakers raising fees without a public vote.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri is asking Gov. Eric Greitens to bring state lawmakers back to the Capitol to pass legislation for a prescription drug monitoring program.

McCaskill said in a Wednesday letter to Greitens that he should call a special legislative session to enact a prescription database.

Old prison
File Photo / KBIA

A special Missouri legislative committee is offering recommendations on how to reform the state's prison system in response to reports of sexual harassment and other misconduct by corrections employees.

The House Subcommittee on Corrections Workforce Environment and Conduct on Tuesday said its suggestions are meant to eliminate what it said was the hostile employee environment to which corrections workers were subjected.

KBIA file photo

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens says the state is adding six more counties to the number being assessed for damage linked to recent flooding and severe weather.

Greitens said in a statement the expanded survey comes as he prepares to make a request for a federal major disaster declaration.

The latest counties in which preliminary assessments will be conducted for individual assistance involving damaged homes and personal property are Franklin, Iron, Laclede, St. Louis and Wayne.

Staff Sgt. Christopher Robertson / Missouri National Guard

Missouri education officials say 39 school districts won't need to make up the days they canceled because of flooding.

The waivers the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education granted this week excuse the districts from minimum school-calendar requirements.

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri's new governor is going to a luxury resort owned by President Donald Trump for a Republican Governors Association event.

The Kansas City Star reports Eric Greitens is among Republican governors attending the two-day corporate policy summit at the Trump National Doral golf course in Miami. The event begins Tuesday and is closed to the media.

The resort was the site of multiple fundraisers for Trump during his 2016 campaign.

Joel Kowsky / KOMU News

The University of Missouri in Columbia is seeing the negative effects of budget cuts and declining enrollment.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the university is expecting its smallest incoming freshman class in nearly two decades this fall, with as much as a 6 percent decline compared to last year.

Local landlords are also offering gift cards of up to $1,000 or rent reductions to bring in renters before the semester ended last week.

Richard Lee / flickr

Increased funding for public education is expected to be a boon to early childhood programs in Missouri.

Extra money is available because Republican lawmakers passed a bill to fully fund the school finance formula for the first time in recent memory. That full funding triggered a 2014 law that allows districts to receive money for pre-K.

The program could cost more than $62 million if all districts take advantage. Educators say that likely won't happen in the first year.

File photo / KBIA

Numerous doctors from around the U.S. could become eligible to treat patients in Missouri's underserved areas as a result of a planned expansion of a first-in-the-nation law aimed at addressing doctor shortages.

The newly passed Missouri legislation would broaden the reach of a 2014 law that sought to bridge the gap between communities in need of doctors and physicians in need of jobs.

File Photo / KBIA

Many top pro-business priorities of Republican Gov. Eric Greitens passed during his first legislative session, but campaign promises to ramp up ethics laws failed.

Greitens' biggest legislative successes of the annual session that ended Friday were on labor issues and changes aimed at making the state's legal climate more business friendly.

But none of his proposals for stronger ethics laws passed.

KBIA

Authorities said a police officer has shot and killed a man who fired rounds at officers and deputies from the rooftop of a Columbia building.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol identified the man as 41-year-old Clarence Coats, of Columbia. Police said in a news release that confrontation started Saturday night after dispatchers received calls that a man was threatening people and firing rounds.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri lawmakers are facing a Friday evening deadline to decide how and if to avoid cuts to personal care services for roughly 8,300 seniors and disabled people.

Funding for in-home and nursing care is one of several measures still hanging in the balance as a 6 p.m. deadline approaches to end work in the annual legislative session.

House and Senate lawmakers on Thursday refused to concede on potential solutions. Inaction likely will mean cuts in services to some of the state's most vulnerable people.

David Shane / Flickr

The Missouri Legislature has passed a bill to create adult high schools for people older than 21 who haven't earned a high school diploma.

The proposal now goes to Gov. Eric Greitens after passing the House on Thursday.

The bill would allow the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to authorize a nonprofit that would start four adult high schools.

The schools would offer industry certification programs as well as high school diplomas. They would also offer on-site childcare.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri public employees could soon be eligible for a pension sooner under a bill that has passed the Missouri Legislature.

The proposal passed the House on Thursday night and will soon go to the governor.

The bill would allow public employees to qualify for pensions after working for the state for five years. Current law states that someone must work for the state for 10 years to qualify for the benefits.

Employees can start receiving the money when they turn 67.

File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri Legislature has passed a bill that would limit how much money people can receive for the medical costs in injury lawsuits.

The 98-53 vote Thursday by the House means the bill will next go to the governor's desk.

The bill would limit people suing to recoup medical costs to receive only the amount that they and the insurance company paid, instead of the cost the hospital would charge for care.

Disaster specialists are assessing flood and storm damage across Missouri in the wake of storms and severe flooding.

Gov. Eric Greitens said Wednesday that local, state and federal disaster specialists are working to determine the size and scope of the damage as part of the state's application seeking a federal disaster declaration.

File / KBIA

Missouri's top prosecutor says a sheriff participated in a jail altercation in which an inmate died and that he should be fired.

Attorney General Josh Hawley says in a news release that he filed a request in court yesterday to remove Cory Hutcheson from his position as sheriff of Mississippi County.

Hawley says his office is investigating the inmate's death Friday. Details haven't been released.

Pages