Associated Press

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chris Koster has released four years of tax returns, showing his income has declined during his recent term as attorney general.

Koster's tax returns show an adjusted gross income of nearly $241,000 in 2012, more than half of which came from investments.

That declined to nearly $172,000 in 2013 as he began a second four-year-term in office, about $136,000 in 2014 and nearly $114,000 in 2015 as his investment income tapered off. His 2015 income consisted mainly of his attorney general's salary.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

A lawsuit accusing Gov. Jay Nixon of age and gender discrimination has been delayed as more cases surface.

The Kansas City Star reports that jury selection had been scheduled to begin Friday in Gracia Backer's lawsuit. She alleges that she was fired from the Missouri Department of Labor because she complained to Nixon's office that her boss was creating a hostile work environment and discriminating against older female employees.

But a judge decided this week to postpone the trial until late February, after Nixon leaves office.

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  A Missouri teenager is suing after a police officer used a stun gun on him during a traffic stop, causing him to suffer a heart attack.

Bryce Masters sued the City of Independence and Taser International on Monday in federal court in Kansas City.

Masters, a police officer's son, nearly died in September 2014 when the officer shot him in the chest with a Taser. Masters was 17 at the time. The lawsuit says he suffered a brain injury that continues to affect his memory and cognitive abilities.

Jason Stockley
Paladin Justice / Flickr

Several members of the St. Louis-area clergy are questioning why it took four years for murder charges to be filed against a former city police officer who fatally shot a suspect.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that representatives of two Baptist organizations, the NAACP and the ACLU on Monday demanded more accountability.

Drug suspect Anthony Lamar Smith was killed by then-officer Jason Stockley in December 2011. Stockley was charged earlier this year with first-degree murder.

A group that presses single women, minorities and millennials to register to vote is apologizing for sending 95,000 mailings listing the wrong Missouri registration deadline.

Casting itself as nonpartisan, the Washington-based Voter Participation Center says the registration forms this month listed Missouri's voter-registration cutoff for the Nov. 8 election as Oct. 17. It's actually Oct. 12, and the center says it has sent out new postcards reflecting that.

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acephotos1 / dreamstime

St. Charles County is joining a St. Louis regional drug monitoring program that seeks to reduce abuse of prescription painkillers.

The St. Charles County Council voted unanimously Monday to join the program, which will start early next year. The regional program comes after the Missouri Legislature has failed to establish a statewide monitoring program like those in the other 49 states.

The legislation will require pharmacies to submit to a database within seven business days information on prescriptions of certain controlled substances. The program allows doctors and dentists to consult the database before they prescribe medications.

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A Missouri judge has thrown out a state ethics case against a man who describes himself as a "citizen lobbyist" because the complaint was filed by a group, instead of a natural person.

The Missouri Ethics Commission last September fined Ron Calzone $1,000 and ordered him to stop trying to influence potential state legislation until he registers and files expenditure reports.

Calzone, a director of Missouri First, says his organization is a think tank that promotes limited government. He says his group has neither designated him as its lobbyist nor pays him for testifying at legislative hearings.

Kansas City police are getting ready to begin testing body cameras.

WDAF-TV reports that police started training officers to wear the cameras Monday. Across the country, pressure for officers to wear body cameras has grown since the 2014 fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

For the next 90 days, at any given time, 25 Kansas City officers will be wearing the cameras while on duty to help commanders determine how much it will cost to store video from the cameras.

PJ Johnson / Flickr

The bills were unpaid, the phones shut off, trash piled up and eventually, food ran out.

The problems at the Benchmark Healthcare nursing home in Festus forced the state to take the unusual step of shutting it down earlier this month.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that by the time the nursing home closed amid its parent company's financial problems, employees were spending their own money to help feed residents.

The home's owner is Legacy Health Systems, a Chesterfield, Missouri-based firm that once had 27 facilities in Missouri, Kentucky and Tennessee.

cornfield
bionicteaching / Flickr

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says this year's corn crop in Missouri is on track to be the second-highest yield on record.

The Columbia Missourian reports that the state was on track as of Sept. 12. The agriculture department predicts there will be an average yield of 165 bushels per acre this year compared to an average of 142 bushels per acre in 2015. The record was 186 bushels per acre in 2014.

Officials are also expecting record yields in Missouri for soybeans. The national agency is anticipating the highest yields on record nationwide.

Cody Newill/KCUR

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump tried unsuccessfully to buy a Kansas City casino in 1999, but documents from that aborted effort aren't public because he withdrew his application for a Missouri gaming license.

The Kansas City-based Hale Center for Journalism reports news outlets and the Democratic National Committee are interested in obtaining the records, but they're out of luck.

A Missouri Gaming Commission attorney says the files are protected from public scrutiny under state law because the commission never acted on the application.

File / KBIA

A state report says Missouri businesses saw a net growth of more than 8,700 private-sector employers in 2015.

The report from the Missouri Department of Economic Development says that's a 5 percent gain over the previous year. The report was released last week.

The Jefferson City News Tribune reports that the report also says small businesses with 10 employees or fewer accounted for 77 percent of Missouri's roughly 182,000 private-sector employers in 2015. Businesses with between one and 49 employees accounted for 95 percent.

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A Missouri state senator says a company that employs about 15,000 people in the St. Louis area should be disqualified from receiving tax credits or investments because it is doing business with Iran.

St. Louis County Republican Sen. Eric Schmitt is pushing legislation to block Missouri tax funds from being invested in any company that does business with a country the U.S. State Department has designated as a state sponsor of terrorism.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that includes the Boeing Co., which has a deal to sell 80 passenger jets to Iran's state-owned airline.

File/KBIA

Columbia is battling a lawsuit from a man whose conviction in a sports editor's death was overturned after he served nearly a decade in prison.

The city argued Wednesday before the federal appeals court in St. Louis that six Columbia police officers should be protected against the claims in Ryan Ferguson's $100 million civil lawsuit. The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that judges will consider the city's immunity appeal before ruling.

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lancerok / Flickr

 

A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

 

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

 

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

St. Louis Rams vs. San Francisco 49ers
KRob2005 / Flickr

A federal judge has ruled that the NFL's Rams must grant season tickets to some people who bought personal seat licenses while the team was still in St. Louis, even though the team is now in Los Angeles.

 

  U.S. District Judge Stephen Limbaugh Jr. also said Wednesday that the Rams must refund deposits for other people who bought PSLs in St. Louis.

 

NFL owners in January approved the Rams' move back to Los Angeles after 21 seasons in St. Louis.

 

It wasn't immediately clear if the Rams would appeal. Messages left Thursday with the team and its attorneys were not immediately returned.

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Steven Depolo / Flickr

A federal judge has upheld Missouri's licensing requirements for African-style hair braiders, despite claims from braiders that the process is irrelevant to what they do, unnecessary and expensive.

U.S. Magistrate Judge John M. Bodenhausen issued the ruling Tuesday. Attorneys for two St. Louis-area hair braiders, Joba Niang and Tameka Stigers, said Wednesday that they will appeal.

Kbh3rd / Wikimedia Commons

A Missouri county's courthouse and law enforcement center remain without telephone or internet service after federal investigators removed computer equipment following a breach of that system.

The Lake Sun Leader reports computer servers and telephone service have been down at the Camden County Courthouse and justice center since Monday, while four members of the county's information technology have been suspended with pay.

DIMPICTURES / Flickr

  Videos obtained by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch provide new insight into a fatal 2011 police shooting that led to first-degree murder charges this year against a white officer, who was carrying a personal assault rifle.

Jason Stockley, who is white, was charged in May in the Dec. 20, 2011, death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man who was shot and killed after a chase.

A federal judge has prohibited the release of videos and police reports by lawyers who obtained it as part of a civil case.

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

A judge says a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won't go to voters this year.

Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green ruled Wednesday that the initiative petitions lacked enough valid signatures to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signatures. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Top officials for Monsanto and Bayer are defending their proposed $66 billion merger as a deal that could help American farmers through greater investments in technology. They made the case Tuesday to skeptical senators worried the merger could hurt American farmers already struggling with lower crop prices and higher seed costs.

The combination of the American seed and weed-killer and German medicine and farm-chemical maker would create a global agricultural and chemical giant with a broad array of products.

Dey / Flickr

A spokesman for a campaign to allow medical marijuana in Missouri says the proposal likely won't go to voters this year.

New Approach Missouri spokesman Jack Cardetti said Tuesday that a Cole County circuit judge won't count at least some contested petition signatures needed to get the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander previously said the measure fell about 2,200 signatures short after local election authorities threw out thousands of signed petitions. Issues included registered voters who signed petitions for the wrong county.

Challiyan / Flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court says voters will get to decide whether to raise cigarette taxes to benefit early childhood programs.

Judges ruled Tuesday that the proposal will stay on the Nov. 8 ballot.

The measure would phase in a 60-cent-per-pack increase of the state's lowest-in-the-nation tobacco taxes. It also would raise fees by 67 cents a pack for off-brand cigarettes, in addition to the tax hike.

Cigarette giant Reynolds American Inc. is backing the proposal.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

 

   The Senate is set to take a closer look at a proposed $66 billion merger of American seed and weed-killer company Monsanto and German medicine and farm chemical maker Bayer.

The deal combines two of the six U.S. and European companies that dominate the agrochemical market, and would create a global agricultural and chemical giant with a broad array of products. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley of Iowa has said he's concerned that the consolidation could hurt American farmers who are already worried about rising costs.

Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

A Missouri initiative to re-instate campaign contribution limits has cleared its final legal hurdle to appear on the November ballot.

The state Supreme Court on Monday turned down a request to hear a challenge of the proposed constitutional amendment.

The proposal known as Constitutional Amendment 2 would limit contributions to candidates to $2,600 per election and cap donations to political parties at $25,000.

Missouri's previous campaign contribution limits were repealed in 2008. Since then, some donors have routinely given five- and six-figure checks.

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

Supporters of a proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri say thousands of signed petitions to get the measure on the ballot were wrongly tossed out.

A lawyer for the group New Approach Missouri told a circuit judge Monday that enough registered voters signed a petition to get the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander's office says the proposal fell about 2,200 short of signatures needed.

Missouri will host the pilot project for an initiative to make radio history available through a national archive.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Radio Preservation Task Force, overseen by the Library of Congress, is collecting and cataloging radio recordings. Missouri is the pilot in part because of preservation efforts already made in St. Louis and Kansas City.

Frank Morris / Harvest Public Media

Bankers say weak farm income continues to weigh down the economy in rural parts of 10 Plains and Western states.

The overall rural economic index for the region remained in negative territory and declined to 37.3 in September from August's 41.1.

Survey officials say any score below 50 on any of the survey's indexes suggests a decline in that area.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss says farm income is expected to decline 12 percent over last year. that is limiting spending by farmers and hurting the economy in rural areas.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has cut $59 million of spending for schools, roads and other programs to counteract new tax breaks enacted when lawmakers overrode his vetoes.

Nixon announced the budget cuts Thursday, a day after lawmakers overrode his vetoes.

The cuts include more than $24 million for K-12 schools, $20 million for highway projects, more than $8 million for higher education and more than $4 million for agricultural programs.

Internal Kansas City police documents show a police unit set up to investigate crimes against children failed to properly investigate thousands of cases, with some detectives doing no work at all.

A special squad asked to clear backlogged cases found such serious problems that Police Chief Darryl Forte in January suspended nearly all of the detectives and sergeants in the Crimes Against Children Unit.

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