The Associated Press

Blaine Luetkemeyer
KBIA

  Missouri congressman Blaine Luetkemeyer is urging the federal Environmental Protection Agency to reconsider newly proposed regulations for wood-burning stoves.

Luetkemeyer sent a letter to the EPA Tuesday saying the proposed regulations could increase the costs of manufacturing wood-burning heaters. He said that could make them unaffordable to many people and drive some small manufacturers out of business.

File / KBIA

  Missouri senators have given first-round approval to legislation that would reward the state's four-year institutions for good performance with more funding.

Under the measure endorsed Tuesday, public universities would establish performance criteria. The criteria would be used to determine how much extra money the institutions get during years the state can afford to increase college funding.

Ameren logo
ForwardSTL

  Ameren Corp. is promoting Warner Baxter to president of the St. Louis-based utility, effective immediately, and he'll become CEO this spring.

Baxter is a longtime executive at Ameren. He succeeds Thomas Voss, who will retire on July 1.

Ameren said Tuesday that Baxter also has been elected to the board of directors. He will become chief executive on April 24 — the day Voss will become Ameren's executive chairman.

Motorcycle with custom Boondocks paint
File Photo / KBIA

  Laws that once banned retail sales on Sundays are largely gone in many states. Yet it remains illegal in Missouri to sell cars, trucks and motorcycles on Sundays.

Now there is effort in the Missouri Legislature to lift the ban for motorcycles.

A House committee heard testimony Tuesday from a Kansas City area Harley-Davidson dealer who is one of the main backers of the legislation. Rick Worth says it's hard for him to compete when a dealer in nearby Kansas can sell motorcycles on Sundays.

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

  

  Missouri House members have given first-round approval to legislation taking aim at synthetic drugs.

The bill would add several specific substances to what is considered synthetic marijuana.

It was endorsed by a voice vote Tuesday and needs a second vote before moving to the Senate.

In recent years, Missouri has tried to keep pace with evolving synthetic drugs and twice has approved legislation targeting them. Sponsoring House member Shawn Rhoads says the current bill is needed to stay ahead in the effort.

rainbow flag
Ludovic Bertron / Wikimedia Commons

 

  The American Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday plans to file suit challenging Missouri's treatment of same-sex marriages.

ACLU's Diane Balogh said Tuesday that the suit will be filed in state court in Kansas City, but she would not discuss specifics. News conferences announcing the litigation are planned for Wednesday morning in Kansas City, St. Louis, Jefferson City and Springfield.

It's unclear if the ACLU suit will challenge Missouri's constitutional ban on same-sex marriages or if it would simply seek recognition of gay marriages from other states.

Courtesy of Mike Menu

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says "our thoughts and prayers" go to the family of a former University of Missouri swimmer who said she was sexually assaulted and later committed suicide.

Missouri House of Representatives

Republican House leaders had pledged an investigation after allegations of a hostile workplace were made against the directors of Missouri's agriculture and labor departments, but that now appears unlikely to happen.

KBIA

  A Missouri House committee is considering legislation to offer additional financial aid to persuade more top students to stay in the state after they graduate.

The legislation would add a forgivable loan of up to five thousand dollars per year to Missouri's Bright Flight scholarship.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A longtime attorney in Gov. Jay Nixon's administration has been chosen as executive director of the Missouri Ethics Commission.

The commission announced Tuesday that James Klahr will begin serving as director Sept. 13.

The Missouri Ethics Commission enforces the state's campaign finance and lobbyist laws. Its director is limited to a six-year term.

A big first for Danica Patrick, but an even bigger second for Jimmie Johnson.

Patrick made history out front at the Daytona 500, only to see five-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson reclaim his spot at the top in the end.

Johnson won his second Daytona 500 with a late push on Sunday, grabbing the spotlight from Patrick as she faded on the final lap. Patrick became the first woman in history to lead laps in "The Great American Race" and was running third on the last lap, but slipped to eighth in the late push for position.

If officials in Washington don't reach a deal to avert the "fiscal cliff," Missouri could see a hit to its economy and budget.

cindyt7070 / Flickr

A long-sought proposal to extend University of Missouri worker benefits to same-sex domestic partners has been expanded to include committed couples of the opposite sex, as well as other unrelated dependent couples, such as roommates.

Upupa4me / Flickr

The sale of a winning Powerball ticket in northwest Missouri could mean about $10 million in unexpected income tax revenue for the state.

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Flickr / steakpinball

A three-judge panel of the Missouri Court of Appeals is planning to take its work on the road.

stephenconn / Flickr

A panel of state lawmakers holds a hearing at the University of Central Missouri this week on creation of a funding formula for higher education institutions.

Todd Akin
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri congressman Todd Akin has amended a decade's worth of federal financial reports to add nearly $130,000 in state pension income that he received over that time.

Stacey Shintani / Flickr

Missouri has received more than $1.2 million in federal grants for its food safety efforts.

Andrew Yost / KBIA

A conservative fundraising group has endorsed Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin and is pledging to direct $290,000 to the Republican's campaign against Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill.

When a private firm failed to meet its promise of providing enough guards for the Olympics, the British military was called in to "mind the gap" in security.

But even though the government is bringing in those troops — as well as RAF Typhoon combat jets, surface-to-air missiles on rooftops, and an aircraft carrier on the River Thames — organizers say it will still look like the Summer Games, and not war games.

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