Casey Morell

Producer, Global Journalist

Casey Morell left Global Journalist in December, 2014.

Ways To Connect

Sergei Chuzavkov / AP Photo

This week, our focus turns, once again, to Ukraine. Since the Euromaidan movement at the end of 2013, clashes between pro-Russian and anti-Russian groups have intensified throughout eastern Ukraine. The United Nations estimates that more than 400 people have been killed in eastern Ukraine since this April, and that more than 46,000 have fled their homes. Journalists have also been attacked. Vice News correspondent Simon Ostrovsky was detained by unknown militants in the city of Sloviansk, and others have faced intimidation, threats and other pressures for trying to do their jobs.

ISIS wreaks havoc in Iraq

Jun 19, 2014
ISIS-in-iraq
Emad Matti / AP Photo

    

This week on Global Journalist, we look at the increasing turmoil in the MIddle East. The group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, has taken control of two of Iraq's major cities and is moving toward the capital. In Syria, it controls much of the northern part of the country. We'll talk to those covering the conflict about the challenges thereof. We also take a look at free press in Afghanistan. Our guests:

Afghanistan's historic election

Jun 12, 2014
afghan-election
Rahmat Gul / AP Photo

Afghans head to the polls this weekend in the second round of their presidential election. It's slated to be the first democratic transition in Afghanistan's history, and the race is down to two candidates. Abdullah Abdullah is the country's former foreign minister, and came in second in the country's last presidential election in 2009. He won the first round of the election in the beginning of April, and is originally from the capital Kabul. His opponent is Ashraf Ghani, Afghanistan's former finance minister. He's from Logar in the eastern part of the country.

syria election ballot
Dusan Vranic / AP Photo

Incumbent president Bashar al-Assad won re-election in a contest many say was not free or fair.

This week on Global Journalist, we look at the results of the Syrian presidential election, and explore what Assad's victory means for the country.We also take a look at the west's response to the election, and how Syrian refugees are impacting neighboring countries like Lebanon.

Our guests:

petra-costa
Courtesy of Petra Costa

The Brazilian documentary Elena tells the story of an actress and artist who moved to New York in search of a career during the country's military dictatorship. This week, we talk to Petra Costa, director of Elena, about her film, Brazilian culture, and what's next for this growing international power.

india-vote
Altaf Qadri / AP Photo

India — the world's biggest democracy — just concluded the largest general election in history. Over 537 million votes were cast over the past month, and voters decided to elect a new government. The opposition Bharatiya Janata Party, led by Narendra Modi, won the most votes overall, capturing 31 percent of the vote. The Indian Congress Party, led by Rahul Gandhi, came in a distant second, garnering just over 19 percent of the vote. Based on the results, the BJP picked up a total of 282 seats in the lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sahba.

european-parliament
European Parliament / Audiovisual Services for Media

You’re probably well aware that every country has a parliament or a legislature of some sort. But, did you know that Europe, as a whole, also has its own parliament? The European Parliament is part of the European Union, and next week, people in EU member states will go to the polls to elect their representatives. We preview the upcoming elections, talk about the potential rise of more far-right parties making a name on the European stage, and walk you through how the European Parliament works.

Our guests:

world-cup-delays
Denis Ferreira Netto / AP Photo

This week, our focus turns to Brazil. The country is set to be in the international spotlight this summer as the World Cup comes to Brazil. But not everyone in the country is pleased with what else comes with the responsibilities of putting on one of the world's largest sporting events. Protests took place last summer during a World Cup warm-up tournament, with demonstrators expressing anger over the amount of money being spent to bring the games to Brazil.

russia-pipeline
Sergei Karpukhin, Pool / Associated Press

This week, we're looking at the increasingly complex state of energy politics in Eastern Europe. Conflicts between Russia, which supplies much of the region's natural gas, and its neighbors are escalating. The United States government has increased sanctions on the Russian energy sector in response to the country's actions in Crimea and the Ukraine. How have markets been reacting to this? What does it mean for the area's balance of power?

Joining us this week:

unclos-protestors-ap
Aaron Favila / AP Photo

We’re all familiar with border disputes on land … but what about those on the water? Maritime disputes in the Arctic and in the South China Sea are increasing, as countries vie for valuable natural resources beneath the ocean’s waves. Current international law sets strict guidelines on what economic rights countries have off their coasts. But, is the system in place the best one? Is the International Law of the Sea still sufficient today?

A roundtable with Pakistani journalists

Apr 17, 2014
pakistani-journalists-church
Kari Paul / Global Journalist

This week, we're looking at journalism in Pakistan. The country remains a treacherous place for journalists to do their jobs. In the past three weeks, two different explosive devices have been found at the home of a television journalist in Peshawar, a city in northern Pakistan. Reporters Without Borders has described the country as "long the world’s deadliest country for media personnel."

What's next in Crimea?

Apr 10, 2014
Max Vetrov / Associated Press

This week, we take another look at the escalating conflict in Crimea, and what it means for the rest of Eastern Europe.

Global Journalist

João Vale de Almeida is the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America. He sat down with Global Journalist's Jason McLure to discuss the crisis in Ukraine, the EU-U.S. relationship, and other topics. Below are excerpts from that interview, but you can listen to the whole interview above, or watch a video of it at the bottom of this page.

Global Journalist

João Vale de Almeida is the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America. He sat down with Global Journalist's Jason McLure to discuss the crisis in Ukraine, the EU-U.S. relationship, and other topics. You can watch the interview below:

Laurence Geai / NurPhoto/NurPhoto/Corbis/APImages

The Central African Republic may not be a country on everyone's radar, but for the past two and a half years, it has been the scene of a bloody conflict that's left thousands dead and tens of thousands more displaced.

The state of free press in Myanmar

Mar 27, 2014
aung san suu kyi
Allison Wrabel / Global Journalist

Earlier this month, journalists and scholars attended a conference on free press issues in Yangon, Myanmar (formerly Rangoon, Burma). Just a few short years ago, holding such a conference in such a place would be considered unthinkable: a military junta ruled the country, and the state of journalism in Myanmar was considered to be oppressive at best.

Such investigations are the work of groups like Human Rights Watch's emergencies team, commonly shortened to "e-team." On this week's show, we talk to the directors of the documentary E-TEAM, who followed four investigators as they carried out their work. We also talk to one member of the e-team about his work in Syria. 

An economic crisis in a country with one of the highest murder rates in the world has led to a month of sometimes violent demonstrations in Venezuela. Polarization between supporters and opponents of President Nicolás Maduro's leftist government has left little room for compromise.

After Egyptian coup, space for journalists tightens

Mar 8, 2014

Egypt's prosecution of four Al Jazeera journalists has spotlighted the country's worsening press climate since the military overthrew former president Mohammed Morsi in July. As tension builds ahead of upcoming presidential elections, press freedoms and democratic rights are disappearing amidst a crackdown on Islamists.

michael sam
Karen Mitchell / KBIA

Former Missouri Tigers football player Michael Sam publicly came out as gay Sunday in interviews with ESPN, The New York Times and Outsports.

Photo provided by Sasha's family

A recent report from ESPN's newsmagazine Outside the Lines criticizes the University of Missouri and its athletic department for failing to intervene in the events surrounding an alleged sexual assault against student athlete Sasha Menu Courey in February 2010.

News coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including

  • American Airlines to add flight to Columbia Regional Airport
  • Missouri legislature to look at school transfers
  • Lawmakers call for Nicastro investigation

News coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including

  • MU to announce new chancellor
  • Mo. Senate passes Boeing initiatives
  • Gov. Nixon addresses mental health education
Casey Morell / Global Journalist

The 9th of November is an important day in German history, for both highs and lows. It's the day the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, and it's the day the German states became a republic in 1918 before the end of World War I.

However, November 9 is also the anniversary of Kristallnacht –  the night of broken glass. On that night in 1938, the Nazis led riots through the cities of Germany. Jewish owned businesses were ransacked; their storefronts defaced with graffiti; their windows smashed. Nearly 30,000 Jews were arrested that night alone, and sent to concentration camps throughout the Reich. Historians widely consider Kristallnacht to be one of the first major events in the run-up to the Holocaust.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including

  • Columbia considers change in zoning regulations
  • Kirksville to get new water treatment plant
  • House Speaker Jones launches committee to investigate Dept. of Agriculture

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including

  • CPD to continue looking for leads in Heitholt murder
  • MU receives gift for veterans' scholarships
  • State, Ameren reach agreement on solar rebates
StoryCorps

Shawn Lee is a former Army infantryman who lives in Columbia. He served in both the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lee and his friend and fellow veteran Daniel Hartman, came to StoryCorps to talk about why Lee enlisted, and the challenges he faced coming home.

This story was edited by Casey Morell for KBIA. Music by Chris Zabriskie.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including

  • Cyclist killed on I-70 identified
  • Funeral services announced for Rep. Skelton
  • Prosecutor dismisses charge in 30 year old murder case
University of Missouri System / Flickr

In a wide-ranging interview this morning for KBIA's Intersection, retiring University of Missouri Chancellor Brady Deaton and Provost Brian Foster reflected on their tenures at the university, noting its continued growth in spite of the economic slowdown and successful recruitment of out-of-state students.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including

  • No charges filed in shooting death of Brandon Coleman
  • Hunters warned about Chronic Wasting Disease
  • New documentary on Winston Churchill premieres

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