Chris Mathews

Chris Mathews was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas. He got his first taste of journalism while writing for his high school newspaper, prompting him to pursue a degree in the field. Chris left Texas and headed north to study at the Missouri School of Journalism. He graduated with a degree in entrepreneurial journalism and a minor in business in May 2016, but returned to MU in August to pursue a master’s degree centered around digital design and production. This is his first semester hosting “Off the Clock” on KBIA. In his free time, you'll likely find Chris playing guitar with friends or watching his favorite sports team, the San Antonio Spurs.

Ways to Connect

Carter Woodiel

One early September evening British Lord Alan Watson prepared for a ribbon cutting. . He held the scissors and snipped the ribbon at the National Churchill Museum on the campus of Westminster College in Fulton.

Watson and Edwina Sandys, Winston Churchill’s granddaughter, among others, were opening the museum’s newest exhibit: a typed draft of the Iron Curtain speech, hung on frames throughout the room. 

Residents in Missouri's 47th District voted to reelect state Rep. Chuck Basye, R-Rocheport, to his second term in political office. The victory came after his opponent, Democratic retired teacher Susan McClintic, conceded the race to the incumbent representative on Tuesday's election night. But memories of Basye's of his narrow win over John Wright in 2014's race had him a bit uneasy before the election. 

Garrett Giles

The ROTC Cannon, better known as the “Mizzou-ka,” made another appearance at Memorial Stadium at the University of Missouri last Saturday as the Tigers hosted Middle Tennessee State for the university’s 105th homecoming.

Today, the cannon sits in the northeast corner of Farout Field, waiting to be fired off when the Tigers score. One thing has changed for the Mizzou-ka though: It’s louder than it has been for a while.

The Pettis County Museum in Sedalia holds records of all the schools and railroads that have existed in the area. Its collection contains records of Pettis County’s residents who have fought in wars.

The museum also houses Native American artifacts. It’s home to objects that have traveled from Angola to mid-Missouri, given to the museum by a Pettis County woman who was a missionary in Angola.

Sarah Kellogg

Columbia’s annual Roots N Blues N BBQ festival kicks off September 30 at Stephens Lake Park. It is one of the city’s biggest events, where fans can hear a range of live music, try out a variety of barbecued meat and view local artwork all in one location. But one particular kind of artwork has become an interesting staple at Roots N Blues.