Chris McDaniel

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Updated 1/14/14 4:43 pm with news of scheduled hearing and Speaker Tim Jones' response. Several state lawmakers are calling for an investigation into how the Missouri Department of Corrections has carried out executions in the previous months. The calls follow a report by St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon that found the department bought its execution drug, pentobarbital, from an Oklahoma compounding pharmacy that isn’t licensed to sell here. Under normal circumstances, the seller could...

Lawyers representing death row inmates have filed a complaint with the Missouri Board of Pharmacy, citing St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon’s investigation from earlier this week. On Tuesday, we reported that the Department of Corrections has been obtaining its execution drug from an out-of-state compounding pharmacy that isn't licensed to do business in Missouri. Under normal circumstances, the pharmacist could be guilty of a felony. "The St. Louis Public Radio story makes clear that the...

In an investigation spanning the past few months, St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon has discovered the state of Missouri may be ignoring its own laws in carrying out the death penalty by buying execution drugs from a pharmacy not licensed to do business in Missouri. As we’ve reported in previous months , a shortage of willing drug suppliers led Missouri Gov . Jay Nixon to direct the state to adopt a controversial new execution method. Now the state is using a sedative, pentobarbital , a...

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is continuing to voice his support for Boeing to choose St. Louis as its location to produce its new commercial aircraft, the 777X. Boeing is shopping for a new location after a disagreement with the Machinists union in Washington. The company and has since met with governors in numerous states. Nixon met with Boeing last week, and said he will work quickly with the state’s legislative leaders to craft a proposal to lure the aerospace company. “This is fast-moving...

A month ago, St. Louis Public Radio reported on the questionable manner in which the state of Missouri got ahold of its potential execution drug. Now Missouri has a new plan to go ahead with two upcoming executions, butthe process is anything but open. Updated 11/14/13 3:24 p.m. On Oct. 11, Gov . Jay Nixon told the Department of Corrections to make a change. He wanted them to come up with a new drug to carry out executions.The drug they’d originally planned to use is a popular medical...

Updated at 11:05 a.m. 11/7/2013 Missouri Rep. Steve Webb, a Democrat from North St. Louis County, was charged Wednesday with numerous counts of campaign finance violations. Webb is facing considerable pressure from his party to step down, but has not decided if he will resign. The misdemeanor charges against Webb are for repeatedly failing to disclose campaign contributions and expenditures. The felony charge is for stealing and alleges that Webb solicited a $3,000 donation that was supposed...

Two weeks ago,Gov. Jay Nixon instructed the Missouri Department of Corrections to come up with a new procedure for carrying out lethal injections. On Tuesday, the department announced that it had chosen a new execution drug: pentobarbital. But the state also made a change that will end up making it harder, if not impossible, to know where the drugs come from. It was already illegal to reveal the identity of anyone who is – or ever was – a member of the state’s “execution team.” Previously,...

On Tuesday, the Missouri Department of Corrections announced that it had selected a new drug for upcoming executions: pentobarbital. The change comes following criticism of the questionable methods Missouri had obtained the drug it had previously planned to use, as well as concern that its use could harm hospitals throughout the U.S. The state had planned to use a common anesthetic named propofol, which has never been used to carry out an execution. All of the drug's manufacturers objected to...

Veronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday, Governor Jay Nixon postponed the execution of an inmate that was set for later this month. That execution was going to be carried out using propofol, a common anesthetic that has never been used in a lethal injection before. So why the change in plans? Part of why anesthesiologists like to use propofol is because it acts fast and has few side effects. In fact, propofol is the most widely-used anesthetic in the US. It’s used on average 140,000 times per day, for everything from...

On Friday, Governor Jay Nixon postponed the execution of an inmate that was set for later this month. That execution was going to be carried out using propofol , a common anesthetic that has never been used in a lethal injection before. So why the change in plans? Part of why anesthesiologists like to use propofol is because it acts fast and has few side effects. In fact, propofol is the most widely-used anesthetic in the US. Its used on average 140,000 times per day, for everything from...

Updated 10/9/2013 6:42 The Missouri Department of Corrections has announced that it will be returning some of its propofol to its supplier, as the company requested almost a year ago. But questions remain on how the state obtained the drug. Propofol is a widely-used medical anesthetic, but the Mo. Dept. of Corrections is planning to use it for lethal injection. Missouris Oct. 23 and Nov. 20 executions would be the first time the drug has ever been used for capital punishment. The European...

propofol
Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

If Missouri goes through with using a common anesthetic in two executions later this year, it could have a very real impact on hospitals throughout the U.S. Gov. Jay Nixon said Monday the state will be moving forward with the executions. The European Union says they will consider possible export limits of the anesthetic propofol if Missouri uses the drug in executions scheduled for this month and next. The U.S. gets the vast majority of the common anesthetic from the EU. The American Civil...

Thousands of conservatives attended CPAC St. Louis on Saturday to listen to more than 40 conservative leaders and rising stars. There were a number of last-minute speaking cancellations for the conference. Members of the US House had to stay in DC to work on a fix to avoid a partial government shutdown. Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri also cancelled , saying he was working on a deal even though the Senate wasnt in session. That decision drew the ire of many conservatives. Out of the...

From gun control to a controversial tax cut, this year's veto session in the Missouri Legislature was one to watch. We had a live blog during all of the developments, which you can read through still below our summaries. Here are a few things to take away: Income Tax Bill The much-covered income tax cut bill is dead -- at least for this year. House GOP leaders brought the bill up, knowing it would likely fail but giving backers one more chance to change minds. “If this bill is allowed to be...

Updated 5:12 p.m. with comment from Walgreens. Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is accusing Walgreens of engaging in false and deceptive pricing schemes, that he said amounts to stealing. In St. Louis Tuesday, Koster announced a lawsuit against the company. Koster had investigators go to stores across the state, and said they found display tags were often inaccurate, and that membership rewards didn’t always deliver on the price reduction. “Overall, more than 20 percent of the items we...

Updated 8-21-13 4:01 p.m. In St. Louis Wednesday,Gov. Jay Nixon sharply criticized a bill he vetoed that would allow juvenile sexual offenders to be removed from the sex offender registry. The Democratic Governor said overriding his veto would undermine public safety and weaken victims' rights. He stood next to a gallery ofmugshotsand distributed information on several individuals who could be removed from the website if the bill passes. “Look at the ages of the victims," Nixon said. "Look at...

North St. Louis County's Normandy School District pointed to a variety of things to entice parents to keep their kids in the district: partnerships and collaboration with nearby universities, new technology, and more staff training. But for the parents of 1,151 Normandy kids, it just wasn’t enough. If you compare it to last year’s enrollment, that means 28 percent will be fleeing the failing school district. The exodus comes after a recent Missouri Supreme Court ruling upholding a law that...

The income tax bill that would eventually reduce income tax rates by about a half of a percent is likely to not be brought up in veto session next month, according to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R-Eureka). Appearing on St. Louis Public Radio's and the St. Louis Beacon's Politically Speaking podcast, Jones said he currently doesn't have the votes necessary for an override of the governor's veto. "Overriding the veto would be monumental at this point," Jones said. "I likely would not...

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax. In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto. Speaking in St. Louis to the Regional Chamber, Nixon said it is a "fiscally irresponsible experiment that didn't work in Kansas and won't work here." Republicans in the state...

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation allowing parents more time to give up newborns, requiring screening for a heart defect and dealing with mandatory reporters of child abuse. Nixon held a bill signing ceremony Tuesday at St. Louis Children's Hospital. In front of dozens of doctors and child advocates, the Democratic governor signed a bill that he said will close a loophole for child abuse reporting. “House bill 505 requires that suspected child abuse be reported immediately – not...

Governor Jay Nixon has vetoed a bill that would have blocked Missouri officials from enforcing federal gun laws, saying it would violate the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution. House Bill 436 declared federal gun laws invalid because gun regulation is not a power granted to the federal government by the Constitution. In addition, the bill lowered the age for concealed carry permits to 19 and allowed those with valid CCW permits to openly carry weapons, even when prohibited by local...

Governor Jay Nixon began aweeklongtrip Friday to Europe to promote Missouri businesses. Senate Majority Leader Ron Richard, a Republican, will be joining the Democratic governor on the trip, as will Democrate state Senator Ryan McKenna. They 'll stop in France, the United Kingdom and Belgium. Missouri businesses exported more than $2.5 billion worth of products to Europe last year - about 20 percent of the state's total exports. “Our exports over the last two years have been records, and we...

April was a good month for legislators hoping to receive freebies from lobbyists, showing a sharp uptick from the previous month in gifts, according to the most recent lobbyist disclosures. The grand total for gifts so far is $619,157. Once again, the vast majority (75%) of the gifts for this month were to groups and committees instead of individual legislators. As we've detailed before, it's a practice that hides the true recipient of the gift. On the individual recipient side, Republican...

Updated 5:02 p.m. May 31 Newly released emails show that Gov. Jay Nixon's administration and legislative bill drafters each had a role in crafting an apparently inadvertent tax increase on prescription medications. The prescription tax hike is included in a bill passed by the Legislature that cuts the state's income tax. Nixon has indicated he may veto the bill. Emails provided Friday to The Associated Press show an official in Nixon's Department of Revenue provided suggested wording in...

Nice restaurants in Jefferson City should be sad to see the Missouri Legislative session end. They’ve received tens of thousands of dollars worth of business from lobbyists courting Missouri’s legislators over dinners and drinks. Who were the legislators taken out for expensive meals? Well, in many cases, we don’t really know. “You look at Missouri, and we have the worst ethics laws in the country. That’s not an exaggeration.” Jason Kander , Missouri’s Secretary of State, said. “We are the...

Millions of consumers have an error on their credit report. In response, Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri held a hearing Tuesday on the consumer report industry. One out of every five consumers has an error on at least one of their major credit reports, according to a study released a few months ago by the Federal Trade Commission. Those errors can cause consumers to pay more or be denied credit or housing. McCaskill , who recently became chairman of the Senate subcommittee on...

Senator Roy Blunt (R-Mo) is one of many co-sponsors of a bill that would allow states to collect sales taxes for online purchases. Under current law, states can only require stores to collect sales taxes if the store has a physical presence in the state. As NPR's Planet Money puts it: If you: 1. Live in a state that charges sales tax and 2. Buy something from an online store that does not charge you sales tax, then you are supposed to: 3. Calculate the sales tax yourself and add it onto...

Infographics: Explore the Numbers In just two months this year, Missouri legislators and state-wide officials received more than a third of a million dollars in gifts from lobbyists. Expensive meals, basketball tickets and clothes are all common gifts to the people that craft our laws and govern us. Probably none of this is surprising to you. It's fairly understood that lobbyists spend a lot of money on public officials. But there hasn't been an easy way to break down that large, and often...

After receiving a tepid response from the FAA on the prospect of changing rules to allow electronic devices likeiPadsand Kindles to be used throughout a flight, Senator ClaireMcCaskill(D-Mo.) announced that she is beginning to craft legislation instead. McCaskillwrote FAA Administrator MichaelHuerta in December , asking him to reconsider the restrictions and telling him that she would look into "legislative solutions" if changes were too slow.McCaskillcalled his response "concerning." "It...

Ed Martin
KBIA

The new chairman of the Missouri Republican Party wants the GOP to be more aggressive in promoting its message and more sophisticated in reaching out to voters. Martin narrowly ousted former chair David Cole on Saturday. Many speculate it was because of the GOP's poor performance in statewide races, where the party lost five out of the six races. Martin says those losses were due to one thing: "We found ourselves at a disadvantage because we were vastly outspent by tens of millions of dollars...

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