Claire Banderas

Reporter

Claire Banderas is originally from Kansas City, Mo and is studying Convergence Radio Reporting and Producing at the University of Missouri. She is an afternoon newscaster and hosts Exam, KBIA’s weekly show on education issues in mid-Missouri. 

Claire Banderas / KBIA

Faith Voices of Columbia hosted a Ward 1 City Council Candidate Forum Thursday night to discuss solutions to poverty and homelessness in the area.


This week on Intersection, we talk about the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran's Hospital's new patient education center and the hospital's patient-centered approach. Our guests are Communications Specialist Heather Brown, Health Promotion Disease Prevention Program Manager Jennifer Schmidt, Public Affairs Officer Stephen Gaither and MOVE! program participant and veteran Kent Lewis.

Listen to the full episode here: 


Florent Vassault

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Lindy Lou, Juror Number 2 follows one woman as she struggles to come to terms with the decision she and her fellow jurors made twenty years ago sentencing Bobby Wilcher to death. When Wilcher was executed in 2006, Lindy had been his only visitor.

 

True False logo
File Photo / KBIa

This week on Intersection, we speak with the directors of several films in the 2017 True/False Film Festival. This year’s festival marks the thirteenth consecutive gathering of documentary filmmakers in Columbia. Conversations include Hebert Peck of I Am Not Your Negro and Petra and Peter Lataster, directors of Miss Kiet’s Children.

Listen to the full show here: 


Steve James

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Abacus Federal Savings of Chinatown, New York was the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges after the 2008 financial crisis. The Sungs are forced to defend the legacy of their family throughout a five year legal battle.

 

Laura Checkoway

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Edith + Eddie tells the love story of America’s oldest interracial newlyweds. Edith, 96, and Eddie, 95, are avid dancers and pillars in their community church.

 

This week on Intersection, we talk with Clarence Lang, Professor of African and African-American Studies at The University of Kansas. Lang’s book, Grass Roots at the Gateway: Class, Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis from 1936-1975, explores St. Louis as an intersection of culture, economy and civil rights movements.

Listen to the full story here:


KBIA

This week on Intersection, we talk with three MU professors about their teaching and research in and outside of the classroom. From the First Amendment and social media to what superheroes can teach us about American history, we're learning from some of our region's fascinating  educators.  

Listen to the full show here: 


Patrick Breitenbach / Flickr

This week on Intersection we talk with three students from the University of Missouri. Last fall Autumn Gholston, Daniel Litwin, Nora Thiemann and about 20 other students spent the semester exploring how to tell stories using sound in a digital storytelling class.

In this episode we hear audio essays these three students produced about everything from friendship to surviving a tornado, and talk with them about stepping outside their comfort zones, writing in new ways and putting their storytelling skills to work.

Listen to the whole show here: 


Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Democrat Judy Baker lost the race for Missouri State Treasurer to Republican Eric Schmidt.

Baker is not new to running for political office having served in the Missouri House of Representatives from 2004 to 2008. During this time Baker served on the Healthy Missouri Caucus. She then served as the Health and Human Services regional director of Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska from 2009 to 2011.

Baker had hoped to combine this experience with her experience as a former economics professor to address the causes poverty in Missouri.

The University Of Missouri System Board Of Curators, along with the campus chancellors and other board members, gathered Wednesday to announce the newly selected university system president – Dr. Mun Choi.

Choi comes from the University of Connecticut where he has served as the provost and executive vice president of the university since 2012. Choi said his career as an academic brings a new perspective to the position of system president. The system’s last two presidents had business backgrounds when they were hired.


Claire Banderas / KBIA

Last Friday, the MU Black Studies Department hosted Dr. Marc Lamont Hill to moderate a community conversation and reflection on the race and social justice issues raised by students last fall. Hill is a professor of African American Studies at Morehouse College in Atlanta and host of BET News and VH1 Live.

The evening began with performances from students, including members of the organization Indie Poets and the Legion of Black Collegians Gospel Choir. 


Claire Banderas / KBIA

Last Saturday students, alumni and community members gathered to celebrate Homecoming at the University of Missouri. A yearly staple of the celebration is a parade that includes bands, floats, and the familiar "M-I-Z!" "Z-O-U!" chant.

Last year that chant was used to drown out the voices of a group of African-American protestors, Concerned Student 1950. That student group was protesting a lack of response to racist incidents on campus. Their protests eventually led to the resignation of then UM System President Tim Wolfe. 


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

The University of Missouri System announced Wednesday its next president will be Mun Y. Choi, current provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Connecticut. The announcement was made at an event in Jefferson City. According to a release from the University of Missouri System, Choi will begin work on March 1, 2017.

Pamela Henrickson, the chair of the Board of Curators, introduced Choi. She called him a “superb leader,” and praised his commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Chelsea Haynes / KBIA

Lincoln University celebrated its 150th anniversary last weekend, and current students and alumni from across the country came together to commemorate the milestone. The homecoming week included the annual coronation of Mister and Miss Lincoln University, the National Panhellenic Step Show, the Homecoming Parade and the LU 150th Birthday Extravaganza.

 

 

The theme for this historic homecoming week was #NeverForget1866, which denotes the founding year of the historically black university in Jefferson City. Shortly after the end of the Civil War, members of the 62nd United States Colored Infantry decided to establish an educational institution known today as Lincoln University.

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

One year after Payton Head, former University of Missouri student body president, shared his experience of being called a racial slur on the MU campus on Facebook , leadership from the University of Missouri System and MU held a press conference to review the progress of the last year that began with student protests calling for systemic action against racism.

Columns at University of Missouri
File Photo / KBIA

There’s a class at the University of Missouri that everyone has to take. It’s called Exposition and Argument, but students and teachers usually strip it down to its “numerical name:” English 1000.

Donna Strickland, Director of Rhetoric and Composition, says that class is an environment that isn’t found many other places on campus.

“I mean these small classes where people can have these intimate conversations,” Strickland said.

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